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Seoul Hockey League Fundraising For Players’ Families After Deadly Rooftop Accident

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Teachers Cory Anderson & Kesayne Reed died May 8th after falling from an Itaewon rooftop in an accident that has both shocked Seoul’s expat community & also generated an incredible amount of support. After hearing the news, friends & Canada Ball Hockey Korea teammates began raising money via GoFundMe & also held a fundraiser at Phillies Pub in HBC. Korea FM‘s Chance Dorland attended that event & spoke with its organizers for this report.

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The post Seoul Hockey League Fundraising For Players’ Families After Deadly Rooftop Accident appeared first on Korea FM.


Dutch Baby Pancakes With Cherry Compote

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Dutch baby pancakes with cherry compote.

There’s nothing that makes me want to drop everything and hightail it to the country like summer. It’s not quite here yet, but it’s on its way, and the evidence is showing up everywhere at the markets.

Summer is a crazy time on a farm. Everything starts to pop up and ripen all at once. At the absolute worst time for it, the kitchen swings into action with bubbling pots of boiling water filling the already sweltering kitchen with steam and the gentle thudding sound of glass jars full of preserves clunking together.

Canning isn’t just for the country. City dwellers who are dedicated to living as much in season as possible can make good use of the practice, as well. Instead of buying imported cherries shipped over on planes in December, it’s nicer to pop open a jar of preserves and remember that stroll through the market in May. To remember, while the snow falls outside, that May will come again.

That having been said, I’ve canned a lot of summer fruit in my life, but hardly any of it has ever made it to see winter.

Dutch baby pancakes with cherry compote.

Dutch baby pancakes with cherry compote.

These crazy good looking Dutch baby pancakes are one of the sexiest vessels for compotes, preserves or even fresh berries. They’re deceptively simple to make, as long as you follow a few rules (very hot oven, room temperature ingredients, lots of butter and don’t open the oven!), and they’re dazzling to watch in process. They puff up like giant eggy clouds in the oven and then slowly deflate when you take them out.

Dutch baby pancakes with cherry compote.

Dutch baby pancakes with cherry compote.

You can have your way with them after that. This weekend I got so excited to see that the cherries were out that I grabbed a giant tub and dropped it in my basket without really thinking about it. I had been at the store originally to grab a cheap bottle of brandy for another cooking project, so I just put the two together with a little sugar and made a compote.

The whipped cream, to compensate, is unsweetened. I actually prefer unsweetened cream. Unless I need to fortify it to hold its shape, I hardly ever add a sweetening agent, as I find it interrupts the flavor more than it aids it. With the sharp, sweet bite of the brandy and sugar in the compote already offsetting the cherries’ bitterness, I just didn’t feel the need.

Summer can be a miserable time in the city, especially in Korea, with the monsoon season. But that time is not here yet. We’re in the sweet spot, and I intend to enjoy it while it lasts.

Dutch baby pancakes with cherry compote.

Dutch baby pancakes with cherry compote.


Dutch Baby Pancakes With Cherry Compote

Yield: 2 large pancakes, 2 cups cherry compote

Puffy, oven-baked pancakes topped with warm cherry compote.

Ingredients

    Dutch Baby Pancakes
  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 6 eggs, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 cup milk, room temperature
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • Cherry Compote
  • 2 cups fresh cherries, pitted
  • 1/2 cup brandy
  • 1/3 cup white sugar

Instructions

  1. Take your milk and eggs out of the refrigerator to warm to room temperature at least an hour before you start cooking. If the milk and eggs are not warm enough, the pancakes will not puff.
  2. Preheat the oven to 415 degrees F (about 213 C).
  3. Melt the butter in the microwave or on the stove and set it aside to cool.
  4. Whisk together the eggs, vanilla, salt and sugar until well combined. Add the milk and whisk again. Slowly add the flour and whisk until all clumps are removed.
  5. Divide the melted butter in half and pour it into 2 9" cake pans (as nonstick as possible) or cast iron skillets. Swirl the pans around until the butter covers the bottom. Gently ladle half of the pancake batter into each pan. As carefully as possible (in order not to mix the butter in with the batter too much) transfer the pans to the hot oven. Bake until the pancake is puffed and well browned in places, about 15 minutes. Keep an eye on the oven, but do not open it. If you open the oven at the wrong time, your pancakes will fall.
  6. In the meantime, heat the pitted cherries, brandy and sugar in a pot over medium heat. Continue gently stirring until the cherries release their liquid and the syrup reduces slightly, about 10 minutes. Remove the compote from the stove and allow to cool slightly.
  7. Remove the pancakes from the oven and allow them to cool for about five minutes. Gently prod the edges loose from the pan using a spatula and transfer to a plate. Top with warm compote and whipped cream, powdered sugar or honey.
http://www.followtherivernorth.com/dutch-baby-pancakes-cherry-compote/

The post Dutch Baby Pancakes With Cherry Compote appeared first on Follow the River North.


Follow the River North
Followtherivernorth.com

Freelance writer and editor. American in Seoul. I write about Korean food. I blog about all food. Last year I wrote a monthly column about traveling to different places around the country to explore Korean ingredients and cuisine. This ignited my interest in local foods and cooking, which I blog about regularly now. I also blog restaurant and cafe recommendations, recipes and some background and history about Korean food.

Categories
Books & Stuff    Cafés & Shops     Korean Food & Ingredients      Personal     Recipes       Restaurants & Bars


Jeonju International Film Festival Interviews with Yana Lekarska

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During the recent 17th Jeonju International Film Festival, freelance journalist & filmmaker Yana Lekarska spoke with Korean-American director Andrew Ahn about his feature debut, SPA NIGHT, & also recently spoke with director Jero Yun about his documentary Mrs. B. A North-Korean Woman. You can find more reports from Yana Lekarska at hangukyeonghwa.com.

Subscribe to Korea FM Talk Radio & News Podcasts Via:

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 Interview answers, both in written & audio form, have been edited for length & clarity.

STREAM or DOWNLOAD via:

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The post Jeonju International Film Festival Interviews with Yana Lekarska appeared first on Korea FM.


I wasn’t a fan of the movie, Lost in Translation, when I first...

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I wasn’t a fan of the movie, Lost in Translation, when I first saw it in my university apartment in 2004. Actually, I think I just saw it that one time and I may have fallen asleep. I think the hype was too great for me and I never gave it another chance.

Regardless, when my friends and I decided to have a “Lost in Translation” night, I gleefully agreed. 

We started with drinks and food in the New York Bar at the top of the Park Hyatt Tokyo. There is a dress code and a cover charge of ‎¥2,200, but you can’t beat the enjoyment of live jazz performances every night with that view.

I had my first dirty martini at that bar and quickly learned that I don’t like that drink. Expensive lesson learned.

After drinks, we went to the Karaoke Kan that they sing at in the movie. We went to both rooms 601 and 602, as shown in the movie. We just showed the address (30-8 Udagawa-cho, Shibuya-ku) to a taxi driver from outside of the hotel, and he took us to the singing room. Pretty cliche, I know. It’s open 11:00 am - 6:00 pm.

I had such a fun “Lost in Translation” night that I don’t want to watch the movie again. I’m hoping my initial dislike for the movie was just due to youth and poor-timing. I don’t really want to disprove that theory because the night was so great.


About 

Hi, I'm Stacy. I'm from Portland, Oregon, USA, and am currently living in Busan, South Korea. Check me out on: Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, Lastfm, and Flickr.

 


Teaching Writing Skills-It Just Got Easier

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Teaching Writing Skills Just Got a Whole Lot Easier

teaching-writing

During my decade teaching in South Korean universities, I taught a whole lot of writing. Beginners, intermediate, advanced. Everything from how to write a basic sentence to 5-paragraph academic essays. For all the details about that, check out these posts:

Teaching Writing in Korean Universities

A Major Frustration of Mine about Teaching Writing Skills

One of my major frustrations about teaching writing was that most of the textbooks I was given by the administration of my university were crap. Although the Great Writing Series from Keith Folse was less terrible than the others, it still wasn’t great. I guess it mostly had to do with the fact that teaching my students to write a 5-paragraph academic essay was kind of a waste of time. Maybe 1/20 of them would ever have to do that if they went to grad school in Canada or the US or whatever. The other 19 of them? Well, they’d have to write business emails, a bit of content for a website, a job application form or resume, or a text to a foreign friend. I wanted to teach my students more how to write coherently and cohesively and less about the structure of an academic essay.

Where I Turned for Help when Teaching Writing

Anyway, I did try to incorporate quite a bit of teaching my students to write with style in my classes. When I did, I almost always turned to ESL Writing for help. Unlike most of the other crap out there on the Internet, it was solid. Really solid. I liked teaching it, the students enjoyed learning it and the worksheets were really well done.

So, it was with great happiness when I found out that Rob Whyte (from ESL Writing) pulled together all that awesome stuff on his website into a single book. I checked it out and it’s even better than the website because it’s well-organized into a single book. I only wish he’d done it years earlier when I was still teaching writing!

Teach Essential Writing Skills: Love It!

teaching-writing-skills

The book focuses on the following four things:

  • Fluency
  • Proficiency
  • Style
  • Inquiry-based reasoning

If you teach writing to intermediate teenagers or adults, this is your book. The best part about it is that Rob offers a money-back guarantee. Use it for a week and if you don’t like it, he’ll refund your money with no-hassle. But, I think you’ll love it. It’ll make your lesson planning easier when you’re teaching writing because you can stop wasting your time searching here and there all over the Internet for the golden nugget. It’s all there in this book. $9.99 well spent.

—>Buy Teach Essential Writing Skills Now<—

The post Teaching Writing Skills-It Just Got Easier appeared first on .


Jackie Bolen: How to Get a University Job In Korea

Amazon
amazon.com/How-Get-University-South-Korea-ebook/dp/B00ORLRP2Y 

My Life! Teaching in a Korean University
eslteacherinkorea.blogspot.com

University Jobs Koreauniversityjobkorea.com

YouTube: youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL0Q8kr18oQIo12jZrwIUdnU4C6eJV5rK


 


Dear Korea #142: No Spoilers, Please!

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I feel like anyone who likes to consume popular media and spends too much time online has experienced this at least once since they came to Korea. Whether it’s with sports, television shows, or even movies, there will always be someone out there to ruin those happy surprises. While I won’t go as far as to claim that such unfortunate circumstances are terrible enough to taint the entire experience for me, I do miss being pleasantly surprised.

In case no one noticed, this comic ended up getting done a week later than planned. What’s kept me so busy? Well, there’s been a lot going on. For example..

HSM

That’s right, folks! I’m coming to Seoul to sell some books and eat some food! If you happen to be in the area and have some time to kill, come by and say hello! I’d love to meet you!


Jen Lee's Dear Korea

This is Jen Lee. She likes to draw.
She also likes green tea.

Got any questions, comments, or maybe even some delicious cookies you want to send through the internet? Feel free to contact us at dearkoreacomic at gmail dot com.

You can also leave comments on the comic’s Facebook Page!

 


This Might Not Work: Overcoming Failure in Photography

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Beomosa Main Gate

This past Saturday was an eventful day. I was pretty much shooting and editing from sun up to sundown. I had to get footage for a documentary that I am a part of in the morning and then I was running a workshop at Beomosa temple that evening. It was a great feeling to know that I have built a day around what I love to do. However, there was this thought in the back of my head that kept me from getting too excited. It was telling me that there was a possibility that this workshop could be a failure. I ignored it and pushed through. Little did I know that the gut-feeling was right.

I left Ulsan with more than an hour and a half to get to Beomosa which normally only takes about 50 minutes on an average day. Sadly, just as we go near Busan a fender-bender slowed traffic to a crawl. It too forever! A we finally made it the to the toll gate, it was already time to start the workshop. I was expecting messages to start flooding in. Nothing came and I expected it was because people were also stuck in traffic too. Beomosa was flooded with people. It took another 30 minutes just to make it to the temple and get parked. I nervously checked my phone, but there was nothing. Not a single message from anyone about the workshop. I walked to the meeting point and there was no one waiting. I looked around to see any photographers with gear looking for me and there was just crowds of people heading up to the ancient temple.

Path to Enlightenment

Keep Your Chin Up

I could have just given up there. I could have just turned around and drove home. However, I had brought out a good friend and I was not about to waste his time. The other thing is that it is not worth the hassle. I just kept thinking about what I could learn from this failure. There is no point in becoming depressed about it. Just learn from it and treat these failures as lessons. Obviously, I need to improve my marketing and a number of other elements in order to attract my tart market.

The thing is that you can’t learned if you are pissed off or angry. People not liking your work or not coming out to your events is not something personal. Think about how many events that you see on facebook and how many you actually go to. It is the same here. For me, I know that I have to work on a lot with regards to my reputation in Korea and who I want to teach. Again, I can’t slow down and feel hurt because of this one night.

0V4B8854

You Will Fail

I hear a lot of new photographers brag as they promote themselves about where they were published or who they are working with. However, the fact of the matter is that they will fail at some point in time. They will throw their hands up in the air and shout “is the worth it?” and what they do next is what will determine their future. If you choose to give up, sell your gear and go home, that is fine. However, if you choose to push on, know that people will not always love your work and that there are going to be some ups and downs. Just understand that not everything that you do will turn you into the next Chase Jarvis or Trey Ratcliff.

Don’t Compare Yourself to Others

The biggest mistake that I routinely make is that I compare myself to other photographers. I let self-doubt creep in and I look at photographers with 10K followers or my friends that have landed a big contract. I look at how long they’ve been taking pictures for and compare that to the years that I have seemingly spent honing my craft. What I fail to see is that they put in a lot of effort regardless of their talent and I have spent many years just sitting back and hoping someone sees my website that I rarely update. The fact of the matter is that you are your own photographer. You decide your own level of effort and that effort will determine what you get out of it. Sitting in the dark wondering why no one knows your name and “other photographers” seem to be doing better will not help you. Be your own photographer and get out there and take photos. If you want recognition, contact  with people and pitch them ideas.

The Red Door

Keep Doing What You Love

At the end of 2015 I was in a bad place. I was working a job that I hated, my best friend died of cancer, and felt empty when it came to my photography. I felt like I was getting passed over despite the years that I’ve put into my photography. However, I couldn’t give up. It kept going and working different approaches.

Within a few months I was published in a number of magazines and did a few interviews. That got me a few clients and a number of new ideas. Sure, some of these may not pan out but a few might. To me that is all that matters.

Even with this more recent failure, I am still planning more workshops and video tutorials because I know things will get better. It is all about learning from your failures. I learned that I have to market smarter and choose better locations. For others it may just be improving different aspects of your skill set. All of which is left unknown if you take these little failures to heart.

 

lantern

The post This Might Not Work: Overcoming Failure in Photography appeared first on The Sajin.


Sous le Gui: Pastry in Hannam-dong

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Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul.

Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul.

Today, the war drill sirens went off. I never used to think much of them, but now that I live near the American army base, everything seems just a little louder and more intense. The fighter jets flew right over the house sending the cats scattering under the bed for cover.

I checked the time. 2pm. Definitely a drill. Everything is fine.

But for the rest of the afternoon, it seems I’ve heard nonstop sirens. Probably no more than usual — it’s a beautiful day, but my subconscious mind seems to be inventing emergencies.

But it is a beautiful day, and all of the store fronts and restaurants are beginning to peel back their facades and open up to the world outside, which is one of my favorite things about Korea.

The back alleys of Hannam-dong are particularly lovely at the moment. The open air kitchens of cafes like Sous le Gui are pumping the streets full of the smell of pastry and coffee.

Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul.

Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul.

“Sous le gui” means “under the mistletoe,” and while there isn’t any mistletoe to be found inside the cafe, and while the cafe is not particularly Christmasy, it’s not too hard to figure out where the name comes from. Dangling from metal pipes and beams that run the width and length of the cafe are dozens of air plants. The cream tiled back room nestles under a skylight with gravel for flooring and a large bush positioned in the center. It kind of reminded me of a bombed out and long abandoned early 80s bathroom. In a nice way.

Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul. Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul.

The floor throughout the rest of the cafe is made of cream brick, the holes filled in with soil and more gravel, while small bushes run the length of the cafe underneath the tables. In reading up about the cafe, the first thing I came across was a blog post from one of the interior designers who essentially found the entire concept to be insane. It works on an aesthetic level, but it’s not the kind of cafe where you go to hunker down with a good book for a few hours. In other words, it’s a bit uncomfortable. But that hasn’t kept it from overflowing with customers from noon to night on most days since it opened in February.

Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul.

Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul.

Sous le Gui, dessert cafe in Hannam-dong, Seoul.

Maybe this is why. Their pastry is beautiful.

The patissier studied at Le Cordon Bleu and she definitely knew what she was doing. While every element of both pastries my friend and I tried was understated and delicate, they somehow all came together to form a dynamic whole. The cappuccino fleur petit (left)  was crisp, but not dry. The flavor of the custard was bright and gentle, while the texture was surprisingly light for how well it held its shape. The cappuccino cream was more Korean style — very whipped and light on the butter, and there was just enough of it. The blueberry pot (right) gave way to the fork like a dream. The custard inside was, again, very light, but the heavier blueberry frosting, fresh blueberries and toasted hazelnuts balanced it out.

I’ve pretty much realized that I like my coffee much stronger than most places brew it. Surprisingly, it’s easier for me to find coffee as strong and dark as I like it in Korea, these days, than it was in Europe earlier this year. But even so, Sous le Gui offers a cappuccino that doesn’t make me feel like I’m settling.

While the design and concept of the cafe may be a bit precious, it is fortified with real substance. If you feel like straddling a bush while having a nice, strong cup of  coffee and a delicious pastry, Sous le Gui may be the only place for you.

Sous le Gui
서울시 용산구 한남동 683-65683-65 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul

Sunday-Saturday 12pm-9pm
Closed Mondays

 

The post Sous le Gui: Pastry in Hannam-dong appeared first on Follow the River North.


Harajuku Gyozaro (原宿餃子樓) has my favorite fried dumplings (gyoza)...

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Harajuku Gyozaro (原宿餃子樓) has my favorite fried dumplings (gyoza) in the world. Seems like it’s always busy, but people don’t tend to stay; they eat and leave. I found it during my first trip to Tokyo and I find myself eager to immediately return every time I go back. 

Address: 神宮前6-2-4 (岡島ビル), Shibuya, Tōkyō, 150-0001, Japan


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