Skip to Content

Recently Featured Content

Recently Featured Content

Longer Ways To Go

IMG_20140413_170613It is a rain-filled Thursday and my last day of teaching at this school. We are doing a K-Pop quiz – the students have to guess which K-Pop song the English lyrics are from, and then I play part of the song. They get nearly ALL of them right, and then sing and dance along. Where they find the time to memorise so much I don’t know. But then, after three days I am humming and nodding along, so maybe it’s not too surprising… It’s not bad this K-Pop stuff.

I will miss these girls – their grins and shrieks, their uniqueness and the long black hair that sheds daily all over the floor. Their giggled hellos; their thoughtfulness and sense of duty. It has been wonderful to be part of their lives for a while.

I have started saying goodbye, to people and also to places. Goodbye to this town, this little neighborhood of mine – the flat green roofs and hidden temples, painted brightly in browns and reds and turquoise. The looming, mist-covered mountain and the narrow back streets that night time fills with the hum of cicadas and distant dogs barking their territory.

The homesickness that grabbed me a few weeks back has passed. Now I am too busy to be anything other than busy. The days that are not wet are hot, and the mountain paths grow with leafy abundance. The cascades of small rocks, dry all winter, have become streams again, and as you trek along damp earth, underneath a green ceiling, you can hear water trickle somewhere in the undergrowth. Dragonflies are back in full force, playing dodge the humans back and forth over the red river-side paths. People carry umbrellas in sunshine and collect herbs from grassy banks.

It is very kind this country. Kind and peaceful. I didn’t expect to love it here, but I do, very much. And I’m sure a new kind of homesickness is coming – the kind that sends me to London’s Korea town in search of Bibimbap, the background murmur of Korean conversation and maybe someone who has heard of Yangsan, or singing lampposts, or both.


Reliving Korea’s Tumultuous History at the Korean War Memorial

There are many museums to see in Korea. In fact, sometimes I feel like it would be an impossible dream to be able to see them all. All kinds of historical museums, art museums, memorials, etc. are found throughout the big cities in Korea as well as the smaller, historical regions like Gyungju, for example.

(Ulsan) An Afternoon in the Bamboo Forest

Exploring the Bamboo Forest is one of the must-dos in Ulsan City. I've been in Ulsan for almost a month and in my opinion, Ulsan is nothing but mountains & lakes.

Today, I spent the whole afternoon with Kimchi boy in the Bamboo Forest. Bad choice because it was scorching hot (~33degrees) today. I would have enjoyed this place much better if the weather was cooler.

"We have to pretend to be a couple.": Weekend Adventure Part 2

So let's see...where did I leave off? Ah yes. Bubble tea. Myeongdong. I had plans to meet Yun around 2, so I settled down on a rock...bench...thing in front of the art museum to wait, splitting my time between people watching and reading. The only problem with the choice to read a book is that when he showed up, he was able to scare the living daylights out of me. I now only possess dead daylights. It's a modern tragedy.

Waygook Confessions! 외국인 고백 입니다!

About Waygook Confessions

Waygook Confessions is an idea that Rachel had years ago, but it didn’t get made until Summer 2014! Here’s the concept: There are tons of cultural differences between Koreans and the foreigners who live in Korea. That’s the case with foreigners living in any country, right? Those differences make life as an expat interesting! Sometimes, an expat foreigner (or 외국 – waygook in Korean) adopts the cultural customs of their host country. Other times.. they don’t! It can be embarrassing when you don’t “do as the Roman’s do” – so sometimes we keep it a secret that we aren’t adhering to the social norms of our host country. Rachel wanted to make a video with people confessing those secrets! And here it is: Waygook Confessions – things that foreigners in Korea want to confess to Koreans!

Busan Citizens Park

A Walk in the Park: Former U.S. Army Base in South Korea Gets "Green" Makeover.

Camp Hialeah, a strategic army base during the Korean war was officially turned over to Busan City in 2006 and recently opened to the public as Busan Citizens Park.

It includes miles of walking paths, bridges, wooded areas, a performance center and several childen's play areas.

Blending the old with the new, the officer's quarters is now a museum retelling the history of the base and the sergeant's housing was converted into an art village.

The park is conveniently located within a short walking distance of metro Bujeon Station 20, Line 1.

The Update You've Been Waiting For...

This is going to be LONG. It just has to be that way. I hate reading long blog entries, so I will try to break it up with pictures…

 I have received so many emails and Facebook messages about what has been going on in my life since my surprising last 3 posts. (Read these before continuing FIRST POST, SECOND POST, THIRD POST)

L2W: Xi in SK before NK, DMZ Tragedy, & Illegal Subtitles

1. National
1) Chine leader Xi Jinping in Seoul, prior to Pyongyang
Xi Jinping visited Korea on July 3, the first time ever a Chinese leader made his first visit to South Korea, before its ‘blood ally’ North Korea. Xi and Korean president Park Gun-hye jointly announced nuclear free Korean peninsula and expedited FTA by the end of this year as well as other announcements that can put the U.S. and Japan in difficult position. Xi also met with Korean business leaders including Hyundai Chairman Chung Mongkoo who appealed for Chinese government approval for its new auto plant in Chongqing.

Seoul Folk Flea Market



Seoul Folk Flea Market
Beautiful pieces of furniture on display throughout the market


Seoul’s  Folk Flea Market

 The Folk Flea Market is an immense flea market located in the heart of Seoul close to the Cheonggyecheon stream. This market’s aim is to “preserve the culture of the traditional Korean marketplace and draw in visitors with a range of folk items that embody the unique charm of Korea.”

Koreabridge - RSS Feeds
Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge - Facebook Group

Koreabridge - Googe+ Group