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ESL Speaking Tip: Expressing an Opinion

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ESL Speaking Tip: How to Express your Opinion

Another very common question type of speaking exam question is expressing an opinion. For example, part six of the TOEIC speaking test shows a question on the screen. You then have 15 seconds to prepare, and 60 seconds to answer the question. When you speak, you are evaluated on: pronunciation, intonation and stress, grammar, vocabulary, relevance of content, and completeness of content.

You can use these four simple steps to do well on these kinds of speaking exam questions.

4 Simple Steps to Express your Opinion

Step 1. State your preference (Directly answer the question). For example,
“Do you prefer A or B? I prefer A.”
“Some people think that… Do you agree or disagree?” “I agree that…”
“Which of the following skills is most important for ______: A, B, or C?” “I think that B is the most important skill for…”

Step 2. Connecting sentence (A) and main reason (B). For example,
I have several reasons to support my opinion (A). Most of all…(B)

Step 3. Further examples and more details.
“For example, I have a friend named…”
“For example, when I was young…”
“For example, I would like to talk about…”
“For example, last month, I had to…”
Then, give more details!

Step 4. State your preference again
Example: “That is why I agree/ disagree with this opinion.”
“That is why I prefer this option.”
“That is why I think “(X-item, quality, skill, etc.)” is the most important thing for…”

Let’s put it all together in a couple of examples.

ESL Speaking Tip, Example #1:

“When taking a college course, do you prefer online lectures or classroom lectures? Give specific reasons to support your opinion”
1. “I prefer…”
2. “I have several reasons to support my opinion. Most of all…”
3. “For example.”
4. “That is why…”

ESL Speaking Tip, Example #2:

“Which of the following skills is the most important thing for parents to teach their children? -being friendly -being creative -being honest. Give specific reasons and details to support your answer.”
1. “I think that… is the most important thing…”
2. “I have several reasons to support my opinion. Most of all, it will…”
3. “For example…”
4. “That is why I think that… is the most important thing…”

Did you Like this ESL Speaking Tip?

If you liked this ESL speaking tip, then you’re going to love this book, Study Tips to Learn English Faster: Become Fluent Quickly and Easily. The advice about expressing your opinion is directly from the book. There are 200+ tips and tricks to get you speaking, reading, writing, and listening fluently in no time.

The authors, Jackie Bolen and Jennifer Booker Smith have almost 30 years of teaching experience with students from around the world. They’ve counselled hundreds of students who want to know how to improve their English skills. This book contains all of the advice they’ve given in one single place!

Do you want to get a better job? Be able to study abroad? Watch your favourite TV shows or movies in English without the subtitles? Make some English speaking friends or a boyfriend or girlfriend? You’ll need to check out this book of ESL speaking tips!

You can buy it on Amazon-it’s available in both digital and print formats. The (cheaper!) digital one can be read on any device by downloading the free Kindle reading app. 200+ tips and tricks to help you with English at your fingertips anywhere you go. Love it? We’re sure that you will! Check out the book for yourself today on Amazon:

The post ESL Speaking Tip: Expressing an Opinion appeared first on ESL Speaking.


Jackie Bolen: How to Get a University Job In Korea

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My Life! Teaching in a Korean University
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How to Find a Language Partner

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Need a Language Partner? Here’s How to Find One

An equally motivated language partner is a great way to improve your English skills. The key is to find someone who is as motivated as you are! This probably is not your best friend or boyfriend, so cast your search wider for a language exchange partner.

It’s best if you find a partner that does NOT speak your first language so you won’t be tempted to chit-chat the whole time! If you do find someone who speaks your first language, make a rule about how much of that language you’ll speak during your time together (maybe only 5% or less?).

Consider an Online Language Partner

If you can’t find a language partner in your area, consider finding one online. A site that I recommend is The Mixxer. The BBC lessons with discussion questions for you and your partner are excellent. It’s most useful if you’re looking to improve your reading and writing skills.

Easy Language Exchange is also another good one that you can check out.

Another, My Language Exchange, allows you to browse by location or target language. You can chat by voice, text, or email, and there are lesson plans available, if you need them. For voice or text sessions, the first half of the period is in one language and the second half in the other.

What about a Language Exchange on your Phone?

hellotalk-language-exchange

If you would rather use your phone than your computer to study with a language partner, there are apps for that! Tandem has over 1,000,000 users and 15 million monthly chats. There are lots of active users at this site.

HelloTalk has similar functions as Tandem, but also allows you to call your language partner (for free) for better sound quality.

Busuu: Excellent for Beginners

busuu-language-exchange

Busuu is available as an app and online. If you use the online version, you can record yourself reading the dialogues and listen to the playback. With the Premium membership, you can submit it to the community for evaluation.

If you’re not a beginner, the exercises will be a bit basic for you. However, if you don’t have regular access to a native speaker or can’t afford to hire one, this is a good alternative. It’s not free, but at the time of writing, only costs €70 per year, which is much cheaper than a tutor!

Like this Tip about Finding a Language Partner?

If you found this tip about how to find a language exchange partner, then you’ll need to check out this book on Amazon: Study Tips to Learn English Faster: Become Fluent Quickly and EasilyThis tip about finding a language partner is directly from that book!

The authors, Jackie Bolen and Jennifer Booker Smith have taught English to students from many countries for almost 30 years. During that time, their students have asked them so many times about how to improve their English skills! This book contains the advice they’ve given them. It ranges from speaking to writing, listening to reading, to grammar, vocabulary, improving test scores to having fun with English and study skills. You’re sure to find something useful-there are more than 200 tips and tricks.

You can check out the book for yourself on Amazon. It’s available in both digital and print formats. The (cheaper!) digital copy can be read on any device by downloading the free Kindle reading app. 200+ tips at your fingertips! Read it on the bus, while waiting for class to start, or during your lunch break. Better English skills are in your near future.

Are you ready to level up? Check out the book for yourself on Amazon today:


How to Say ‘Candy’ in Korean

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Are you one of those people with a bit of a sweet tooth? Are you interested in trying out Korean candy, but not sure how to ask for recommendations from the locals? Would you love to impress your friends with your Korean language skills?

When your sweet tooth kicks in, it’s good to know how to say candy in Korean. In this lesson we’ll teach you the word you’ll need to know when asking your Korean friends which type of candy is good to purchase, and how to recognize it.

 

*Ready to learn Korean yet? Click here to learn about our 90 Day Korean learning program!

 

‘Candy’ in Korean

The word for candy is 사탕 (satang) in Korean. So simple and sweet, just like how candy should be!

You can also use the Konglish word 캔디 (kaendi) to describe candy to a Korean person and they’ll understand you. However, 사탕 is more commonly used and knowing the word will make it easier for you to explain your candy-related experiences.

 

Related Vocabulary

Lollipop

Cotton candy = 솜사탕 (somsatang)

Peppermint candy = 박하사탕 (bakhasatang) 

Jawbreaker = 눈깔사탕 (nunkkalsatang)

Lollipop = 막대 사탕 (makdae satang) 

Sugar = 설탕 (seoltang) 

Chocolate = 초콜릿 (chokhollit) 

A bag of candy = 사탕 한 봉지 (satang han bongji) 

 

A word of caution about Romanization

While it is possible for you to study the words in this article simply by reading their romanized versions, it will come in handy for you to be able to read Hangeul if you ever wish to come to Korea. Hangeul is the Korean alphabet, and not difficult to learn. In fact, you can learn it in just 90 minutes.

After you’ve familiarized yourself with Hangeul, life in Korea will suddenly seem so much easier and the country won’t appear so foreign for you. So, if you’re serious about learning Korean, why not learn Hangeul today?

 

Sample Sentences

Standard:

제일 좋아하는 사탕을 뭐예요? (Jeil johahaneun satangeul mwoyeyo?)

What is your favorite candy?

이런 사탕을 깨물어 먹어 본 적 있나요? (Ireon satangeul kkaemureo meokeo bon jeok itnayo?)

Have you tried to chew on a candy like this before?

 

Informal:

나는 사탕을 싫어해. (naneun satangeul sirheohae.)

I don’t like candy./I hate candy.

사탕을 빨고 있어. (Satangeul bbalgo isseo.)

I am sucking on candy.

왜 사탕이 다 없어졌지? (Wae satangi da eobseojyeotji?)

Why is all the candy gone?

 

Go on and tell it to all your Korean friends now about your favorite candy and ask them to introduce you to their favorites as well. Now that you know how to say candy in Korean, the whole world of candy in Korea has finally opened to you! Be sure to share with us what you like best about your favorite Korean sweets in the comments below!

 

*Want more Korean phrases? Go to our Korean Phrases Page for a complete list!

 

Photo Credit: BigStockPhoto

The post How to Say ‘Candy’ in Korean appeared first on 90 Day Korean.


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MangWon-derful: Zapangi 자판기 Treats and Colourful Streets

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Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

 Zapangi 자판기

In an effort to feel like we were on a proper vacation, Hallie from The Soul of Seoul and Amanda from Seoulody Smiles and I ventured out to Mangwon!  The weather has been amazing.  Between sunny skies and colourful walls all around Mangwon, we had tons of opportunities for tasty eats (Bali in Mangwon) and instagram sweets.  We got to Zapangi just as the doors opened.  There was already a line…

Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

Mangwon-dong(망원동) or Mangridan-gil(망리단길) is quickly becoming a hot spot for cute cafes and sickly sweet desserts.  We had seen Zapangi all over instagram and wanted to check out this cafe with over the top, aesthetically pleasing mermaid mochas and fondant donuts.  They also seem to have a sweet speakeasy style entrance.  We all know how I love to unearth a Seoul Secret…

Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

Spoiler Alert: Zapangi is actually totally accessible via a big bay window at street level.  The line stretches so long they have to have cones set up to keep savvy snappers in check.  We arrived right as it opened, and there were plenty of Koreans and tourists alike lined up to get the perfect ‘gram and snack.

Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

Menu at Zapangi  자판기

The menu at Zapangi is pretty much what you’d expect.  The beverages are pretty simple.  They have coffee served black or with milk.  The soy latte is a nice addition, but is (of course) more expensive.  Most people come for the overpriced mocha, however.  The mochas arrive with a whopping pile of pastel whipped cream and pearl sprinkles.  You can add a mermaid tail if you’re into paying another KRW 2,000 for a bland, but pretty, cookie.  Hallie and I split the Aurora Mocha and a Doughnut to start the day!

Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

Hallie and I shared the iced mocha (served just like a hot chocolate) and the doughnut.  I wanted a pretty mermaid one, but they dished out the heart one so I guess you get what you get.  The iced mocha itself was delicious.  The chocolate was rich and slightly bitter.  The drink itself was insanely sweet, but the rich and bitter elements made it a lovely, decadent drink.  The whipped cream on top wasn’t sweet at all.  For all that gorgeous, auroroa borealis pearl topping, there was absolutely no flavour.  The whipped cream was a thick,sad, unsweetened topping.  Considering much of the drink was this topping, I was a little disappointed.

Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

While cute, our Zapangi doughnut was a bit on the small side for KRW 5,000.  I wonder if perhaps we should have tried out the tin cake instead.  The cake was fairly dry and bland.  The cake flavour would be comparable to an old-fashioned.  The icing was much thicker than a glaze or even your average doughnut icing and was sweeter than we could have ever imagined.  This doughnut covered each extreme combining bland and sickly sweet.  Great for a photo, but neither of us finished our half of the Zapangi  doughnut we split.

Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

Vibe at Zapangi 자판기

The vibe at Zapangi even when we doubled back later was pretty chill.  A lot of people just use the door for editorial style shots and don’t even make a purchase.  That’s not cool – if you’re going to hit up Zapangi make sure to earn your shoot and buy a prop.  The cafe itself is pretty big, but the seating isn’t exactly designed for a lengthy stay.  If you want to impress your insta-blogger partner, make a quick trip to Zapangi then venture through Mangwon Market or to any of the many great cafes or restaurants in the area!

Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

Contact Zapangi 자판기

Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Zapangi Dessert Cafe Tin and Bottle Mangwonderful Mangwon Hongdae Seoul Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

The post MangWon-derful: Zapangi 자판기 Treats and Colourful Streets appeared first on The Toronto Seoulcialite.


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Korean Phrases Ep. 53: 백문불여일견

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This week's new video is a "Korean Phrases" episode. This series is for learning quick idioms and phrases in Korean. This week we'll be learning about an idiom that originally comes from China and the Chinese language. But it's still useful to know in Korean. And this week we'll learn about the idiom 백문불여일견.

Even if you don't use any of these idioms in this series when speaking, you might find them written in books, or hear someone use them when speaking.

Check it out here~

The post Korean Phrases Ep. 53: 백문불여일견 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.


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Ang Traje de Boda sa Ukay-ukay PART 4

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PART 4: Ang Sumpa Parang isang masamang panaginip lamang ang lahat. Isang masamang panaginip nga lang ba? Sana… sana… Malamig, malamig na malamig ang pakiramdam ko at para akong nakalutang sa kawalan. Hindi ako makakilos kahit kaunti. Pakiramdam ko’y nakagapos … Continue reading

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Annihilation without Representation: Do S Korea & Japan have a Veto over Action against N Korea?

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This is a local re-post of an essay I wrote for The National Interest this month. The TNI editors gave it the very helpful title, “The True Danger of the North Korea Crisis: It Could Cost American Its Allies.” That is exactly right. If the US strikes North Korea without getting the consent of South Korea and Japan, they will exit the alliance. Why stay when your ally jeopardizes potentially millions of your citizens and doesn’t even get your permission? And this would have a huge demonstration effect on other US allies too. Now you know that Trump thinks you’re expendable. Why would you stay?

So to me, that is the big question going forward: Will Trump even bother to call the South Koreans and Japanese before he strikes? He couldn’t be bothered to appoint an ambassador to South Korea, and presidenting is pretty hard. So hey, why bother? Fox and Friends is on…

The full essay is below the jump:

 

 

 

Tough North Korea rhetoric from the US administration continues. Major South Korean media increasingly talk as if US airstrikes are likely, and the expert community seems increasingly resigned to them as well. Despite constant criticism of his incendiary language, US President Donald Trump continues to suggest that major action against North Korea is imminent – most recently by suggesting that we are now in a period of ‘calm before the storm.’

I have argued in these pages that such strikes would be an enormous risk. We do not know what the North’s redlines for retaliation against such a strike are. We do not know if the strikes would so unnerve the North’s elites that war was next, that they would respond with enormous force, possibly including nuclear weapons. An expert study of this scenario suggests appalling casualty numbers. We also do not know what China’s thresholds are for intervention. China is treaty-bound to help North Korea if it is attacked. It may not, but if a US airstrike against North Korea spirals into a major conflict, then the likelihood of Chinese intervention rises.

It is also worth noting that even if the Chinese and North Koreans do not respond to airstrikes, North Korea will almost certainly deploy human shields as soon as the bombs start to fall. And the North has so many targets that the US would like to hit, that any ‘airstrike’ would look a lot more like a major air campaign and not a quick ‘surgical strike,’ as in Syria earlier this year. An air campaign against sites with human shields means a high civilian death toll. The North Koreans will not make this easy for us at all.

White House officials, including most importantly Secretary of Defense James Mattis, continue to suggest that diplomacy is the preferred outcome. And there are options to continue to buy us time against the North Korean nuclear and missile programs: missile defense, sanctions, continuing to cajole China to push North Korea harder, and so on. Nevertheless, the pressure to something dramatic regarding North Korea is rising. If war is inevitable – it is not, but for the sake of the argument – it is better to fight now, before they have more weapons, and before those weapons can more evidently strike the continental United States. Even Kim Young-Sam, South Korea’s president at the time of the 1994 nuclear crisis, has apparently retrospectively regretted his decision not to strike then.

President Kim’s veto of the strike at the time blocked US action. This question is now returning as Trump raises the rhetorical heat on Pyongyang. And this time, it involves Japan too, as it is now in range in range of North Korean missiles, and likely nuclear missiles. Japan has already practiced civil defense drills. But if the US were today, as in 1994, to extend an, albeit unspoken, veto to South Korea, and now Japan too, war is unlikely. They do not want it.

Americans may feel incensed at having to get ‘permission’ from others to act. Trump particularly is unlikely to feel such commitments. And hawks may suggest that because North Korea can range the US, we are threatened too and therefore no longer require allied permission. Nevertheless there are strong national interest reasons, if not moral ones, to once again solicit allied approval.

First, it is South Koreans and Japanese who will bear the brunt of any North Korean retaliation for a US strike. Yes, North Korea can, perhaps, now strike the US homeland, but the North’s ability to devastate the US is significantly lower than its ability to damage South Korea and Japan. If we are going to drag South Korea and Japan, unwantedly, into a war that could result in hundreds of thousands, or even millions, of their casualties, plus irradiated blast zones, refugees, and the possibility of state collapse, we should at least get their permission. It would be staggeringly immoral, an astonishing act of callousness in American history, if US action led to nuclear use against South Korea and/or Japan without their permission. The British referred to this problem in the early Cold War as ‘annihilation without representation’ – the Americans might go to war with the Soviets over the heads of NATO, but the NATO states would be destroyed in the cross-fire.

Second, if this normative argument is unpersuasive, then consider the impact on US national interest if allies around the world saw the US sacrifice, or risk sacrificing, South Korea and Japan without even soliciting their approval. This would end pretensions that US hegemony is liberal or benign. It would destroy allied trust that the US considers their interests too. It would appear as if the US were using allies instrumentally as shields or buffers to absorb enemy fire. That is akin to why the Soviet Union did not leave eastern Europe in the late 1940s – to serve as a buffer against the West and a locus for the next war, rather than inside the USSR itself. This was yet one more reason for the Warsaw Pact states to exit the alliance as soon as they could. It is similarly likely that America’s alliance system would collapse if the US risks major, perhaps nuclear, conflict without allied consent but fought on their soil. Trump’s advisors likely realize this; does the president?


Filed under: Alliances, Japan, Korea (North), Korea (South), Media, The National Interest, Trump


Robert E Kelly
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science & Diplomacy
Pusan National University

@Robert_E_Kelly

 

 


Extensive Reading for ESL/EFL Students

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Extensive Reading for English Learners

The best speakers of English are those that can read fluently. Extensive reading is an excellent way to learn a language the natural way. Extensive reading means reading for enjoyment and to develop general reading skills. It can be compared with intensive reading, which means reading in detail with specific learning aims and tasks. For example, to answer a set of questions based on the reading.

English Grammar and Vocabulary used in the Real World

Extensive reading helps you see how grammar and vocabulary are used in the real world. You’ll see all the stuff you’ve probably learned from a textbook in a natural context. Keep in mind two things: you should choose something at a slightly lower level, so you’re able to read for pleasure, and you shouldn’t stop and get out the dictionary every two seconds. This will make you feel frustrated and you’ll probably give up!

My general rule of thumb is that you shouldn’t use your dictionary more than once per page. If you do, the book is too difficult for you if your purpose is extensive reading (reading for fun!). In this case, put that book back on your bookshelf and get an easier one. Test out the book before you borrow it from the library or buy it from the store. Read one page and see how you do. Can you understand almost everything relatively easily? Good! Start with that one.

Start with Teen Fiction

I always suggest to my students that they start with teen fiction. The stories are quite interesting (I like reading them too!) and the language is less difficult. Once you’ve mastered that genre, it’s time to start reading more difficult stuff like in-depth magazine articles, or adult fiction.

Top 10 Extensive Reading Ideas for ESL/EFL Students

Some suggestions in the teen fiction genre you might enjoy are the following. Clicking the links below will take you to the book on Amazon.
1.The Hunger Games Series
2.The Twilight Series
3. The Harry Potter Series
4. His Dark Materials Series
5. A Wrinkle in Time
6. Charlotte’s Web
7. The Giver
8. To Kill a Mockingbird
9.The Anne of Green Gables Series
10. The Chronicles of Narnia

Did you like this Extensive Reading Tip?

If you liked this tip about extensive reading for English language learners, then you’ll need to check out Study Tips to Learn English Faster: Become Fluent Quickly and EasilyThere are 200+ ideas for how you can learn English quickly and easily.

The authors, Jackie Bolen and Jennifer Booker Smith have taught English to students from around the world for almost 30 years. In this book, they’ve put together all the advice they’ve given students during that time for how to improve their English skills. Reading, writing, listening, speaking, grammar + vocabulary, and English proficiency exams. If you’re ready to level up your English, you’ve most definitely come to the right place.

The book is available on Amazon in both digital and print formats. The (cheaper!) digital one can be read on any device by downloading the free Kindle reading app. Better English awaits you! Check out the book on Amazon today:

The post Extensive Reading for ESL/EFL Students appeared first on My Life! Teaching in a Korean University.


English Speaking Tip: Keep the Conversation Going

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English speaking

English Speaking Tip: Learn How to Keep the Conversation Going

I’m sure you’ve had this experience before. You’re at a party, at school, or at a family event. You’re talking to someone and then you start to have nothing to talk about. It can be a bad feeling, and I know that it most definitely makes me nervous. I’m sure it’s the same for you. Here are some English speaking tips to help you keep the conversation going. Learn how to be an excellent conversational partner and avoid that awkward silence!

Are you ready for some conversation awesome? Let’s go!

Go Back to an Earlier Topic

If your conversation is dying, you can keep the conversation going by returning to an earlier topic. You can say, “Earlier, you said _____. Tell me more about that.” This lets the listener know that you are a good listener yourself and interested in what they have to say.

Give Some Details

Expand what you say by giving details, rather than just a short, direct answer to a question. For example, if someone asks you about your vacation, don’t say, “It was great!” and leave it at that. Tell them a few highlights. “It was great! I hadn’t seen my family in a year, so I spent most of my time catching up with everyone.” This isn’t so long that someone who isn’t interested will get bored, and it opens up new areas for questions if the listener wants to know more.

Offer Some Examples

Support what you say with details and examples. Just as in writing, you sometimes need to “prove” what you say. You can use phrases in speaking that you use in writing. Some examples include:
“In my opinion, . . .”
“I think . . .”
“For example/ instance . . .”
“To elaborate, . . .”

Summarize the Main Points

Summarizing what you hear is a great way to confirm your understanding of the conversation. This is something native speakers do, especially at work or if some type of commitment is being made. To summarize a conversation, state any important facts or information as well as any agreements that have been made. For example, “I’ll email the report to you by 5:00 this Friday.” This short sentence checks several details: the report will be emailed, not printed; the due date this Friday, not next Friday; and you have until the end of the day to complete it. If anything in your summary is incorrect, the listener should correct you, “Oh, don’t rush; you have until Monday to finish it.”

If you’re not sure that you heard something correctly, you can say,
“If I understand correctly, you. . .”
“So, what you’re saying is. . .”
The person you’re talking to will confirm or deny what you say.

Like these English Speaking Tips?

If you like these English speaking tips, then you’re going to need to check out the following book on Amazon:

Study Tips to Learn English Faster: Become Fluent Quickly and Easily

There are 200+ tips and tricks to help you learn English quickly and easily. The authors, Jackie Bolen and Jennifer Booker Smith have taught students from around the world for 30 years. In this book, they’ve organized the advice they’ve give their students about speaking, listening, reading, and writing in English. Plus, there are a ton of English speaking tips, as well as tips for taking English speaking exams.

If you want to improve your English skills, then you’ll need to check it out. Are you ready to level up your English game? We hope so! Study Tips to Learn English Faster: Become Fluent Quickly and Easily is available on Amazon in both digital and print formats. The (cheaper!) digital one can be read on any device by downloading the free Kindle reading app.

Click the button below to buy the book today:

The post English Speaking Tip: Keep the Conversation Going appeared first on ESL Speaking.


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