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Seoul-stagram Goals: StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe @ Pink Hotel

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Seoul Cute Cafe Theme Cafe Review StyleNanda Pink Hotel Pink Pool Cafe Myeongdong Seoul Korea Best Theme Cafe Toronto Seoulcialite

StyleNanda Pink Hotel

The new StyleNanda flagship store in Myeongdong has been brought to my attention by several Seoul blogger and insta-blogger friends in Korea.  Normally I wouldn’t want to saturate the WWW with a story my friends have already covered.  When friends of mine from Toronto came to Seoul for a quick visit, the StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe instantly came to mind.  Sure, they’d want to see the mega hits in Seoul, but I wanted them to get a sense of the cafe culture in the city.

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StyleNanda Pink Hotel Lobby

Wes Anderson fans rejoice!  The lobby of the StyleNanda Pink Hotel is totally reminiscent of the Grand Budapest Hotel.  I wouldn’t have believed it myself had it not been for The Soul of Seoul’s recommendation to visit this quirky spot.  Everything is pink, gold, and luxurious.  The velour accents make the whole place feel old, yet charming.  Details like the keys at the information station and the gold elevators really make you feel as though you’ve entered a completely different era…and perhaps even country!

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StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe

The StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe did not disappoint!  This floor looked like we were actually about to step out into a 90’s “Saved by the Bell” diner-themed pool party (you remember “The Max”, right?).  The neon lights were adorable and well-placed.  The lighting in most areas was very bright – perfect for instagram shots, of course!  We each ordered different drinks, charged our phones, and then made our way through the giant shop.

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StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe Drinks

My blue cream soda slushie topped with blue cotton candy immediately began to fall apart.  It made a giant mess all over the table.  Word to the wise – they have wet tissues up at the counter.  Working with this much cotton candy I guess they knew they’d have to!  While messy, my cream soda slushie (actually just named “soda”, so don’t be fooled) was incredibly delicious.  The slushie itself wasn’t too icy.  I prefer mine to be cold, but smooth, so it was great!  My melting cotton candy even hit the spot…what was left of it!

StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe Coffee

A ordered the Americano which came with cotton candy.  Truth be told it was pretty watery and not something I’d want to order myself.  J, on the other hand, got a brewed coffee which might have been the best I’ve had in Korea thus far.  Korea isn’t exactly well-known for producing a great cuppa Joe, so if that’s what you’re craving this coffee might be for you!

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StyleNanda Clothing, Accessories, & Make-Up

Each floor had its own unique design catering to the style of item being sold.  We found really reasonably priced jeans, shirts, bathing suits, jewelry, bags, and make-up – TONS of make-up!  I didn’t pick anything up a we were in a bit of a rush, but That Girl Cartier will definitely be back to hit up the StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe rooftop.  It was unfortunately closed the day we went, so I’ll have to check it out again soon!

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Where is the StyleNanda Pink Hotel Flagship Store?

STYLENANDA PINK HOTEL Flagship Store & STYLENANDA PINK POOL CAFE
** Take Exit 6 of Myeongdong Station **
37-8, Myeongdong 8-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea
(66-2, Chungmuro 2-ga)
Open hours : 11:00 – 23:00
Check out my friend Arielle aka “Soju4Two” on YouTube for her experience at The StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe!

StyleNanda Pink Hotel Flagship Store instagram Faves

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The post Seoul-stagram Goals: StyleNanda Pink Pool Cafe @ Pink Hotel appeared first on The Toronto Seoulcialite.


The Toronto Socialite
 
      
That Girl Cartier
 
     

 


Caribbean Bay Water Park Discount Ticket Promotion for Foreigners Only on Trazy!

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Looking for discount tickets to Caribbean Bay, the best Korean water park near Seoul? Be sure to check out these special discounts for foreigners and deals!
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Trazy.com
a service for travelers to easily share and discover the latest hip & hot travel spots from all over the world. 
We are currently focusing on Korea as our destination and plan to expand to other countries gradually. 


3 Must-Try Rides & Attractions at Caribbean Bay Water Park in Korea

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Planning a visit to Caribbean Bay, Korea? Here are the 3 must-try rides at Caribbean Bay Water Park, the best Korean water park near Seoul!

Korea 1967

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Korea1967When stationed in Korea 1967, I took up photography as a hobby.  Below are some of  the photographs.  You can find the entire set at Korea1967.blogspot.kr
Please feel free to inform friends and family of the people depicted that they can be download from here.

- Mark Presco
Korea1967.blogspot.kr


  
  

 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

 

 


North Korean Nukes are almost Certainly for Deterrence and Defense

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8114998_origThis is a local re-post of an essay I wrote for The National Interest this week.

I feel like a broken record. I keep saying this – they’re not going to use them offensively, we don’t need to airstrike (at least not yet), we have learned to live with Russian, Chinese, and Pakistani nuclear missilization, the North Korean leadership is rational enough to know that using these things against a democracy would bring extraordinary retaliation. So yes, it really, really sucks that North Korea has these weapons, but we can adapt, as we have to other countries’ nuclear missilization. We don’t HAVE to start a potentially huge regional war over them right now. If we must, we always can. But let’s not get carried away that North Korea is going to nuke the US out of the blue, so we should airstrike them right now. That is HIGHLY unlikely.

But journalists keep asking me if we’re going to/should bomb North Korea, and US officials keep saying stuff like this. So here we go again:

 

 

Since the launch of a North Korean medium- to long-range intercontinental missile this month, there has been much anxiety about North Korea’s ability to strike US cities. It seems likely that North Korea can strike Anchorage at least, Alaska’s largest city. Some analysts have suggested North Korea already has the capability to strike the east coast of the United States. Skepticism may be warranted. North Korea may have trouble with missile re-entry, guidance, warhead miniaturization, and other technical issues. But nonetheless, it appears quite likely that if Pyongyang does not yet have the ability to strike the lower forty-eight American states, it will soon. Last month, I suggested the US is on countdown of sorts. North Korea is rushing toward a nuclear ICBM, and the Americans will soon be forced to adapt to it, or fight. It appears that decision fork is coming sooner than many expected.

Striking North Korea would be incredibly risky, and the United States has learned to live with other states’ nuclear missilization. Russia, China, and Pakistan are nuclear powers whom the US would almost certainly prefer did not have these weapons. Yet the US has adjusted. Each of those three, including Pakistan, has treated its weapons reasonably carefully. There has not been the much-feared accidental launch or hand-off to terrorist groups. All appear to consider their nuclear weapons as defensive for deterrence purposes. Indeed, the offensive potential of nuclear weapons is curiously constrained. They would so devastate an enemy that conquering that enemy would be pointless – who wants to take-over an irradiated wasteland? Plus, nuclear use would likely bring nuclear retaliation on the attacker, in which case any war benefit would be lost to the huge costs of nuclear destruction in the homeland.

This logic would seem to apply to North Korea as well. In the most extreme possible scenario, where North Korea used nuclear weapons against the South to facilitate a successful invasion of it, the devastation in the South would be so awful, that one wonders why North Korea would want to invade at all. Due to the peninsula’s mountainous terrain, only a few areas of South Korea are easily habitable for large numbers of people. Something like 75% of the population lives on 30% of the landmass. Those small areas – basically the South biggest cities – would be targets of Northern nuclear weapons in any such war. If North Korea were to win that conflict, it would then inherit those irradiated, blasted population zones, plus all those scarcely usable mountains. What would be the point of winning then? Of fighting at all?

Similarly, North Korean nuclear use against the South – or Japan or the US – would bring devastating American nuclear retaliation against the North. South Korea and Japan are treaty allies of the US for decades. These relationships are about as robust as any in the US alliance network. Countless secretaries of state and defense have pledged to protect Seoul and Tokyo. So American nuclear retaliation would almost certainly follow any Northern offensive nuclear strike. North Korea would inherit an apocalyptic wasteland in the South, while absorbing punishing nuclear retaliation at home – so punishing in fact, the regime itself might collapse under the weight of the social chaos unleashed by American nuclear strikes.

And if that were not bad enough, one could easily see China attacking North Korea if it were to offensively use nuclear weapons. China may maddeningly tolerate North Korea’s nuclearization, but it is hard to imagine Beijing tolerating a North Korea using those weapons offensively. Beijing might well then be the next target. It is easy to foresee the US and China working together to destroy North Korea if it aggressively used nuclear weapons.

Some fear North Korea might ‘hand off’ a weapon to rogue groups, but no states have yet done that. Other suggest nuclear weapons might be a method to bully South Korea into subservience or permanent subsidization. But so long as South Korea remains allied to the United States, it is not clear why North Korean nuclear blackmail would succeed. North Korean nuclear weapons level the nuclear playing field in the peninsula rather than shift it against South Korea.

In short, North Korea’s possible use of its nuclear arsenal is highly constrained. It fits the profile of other state’s nuclear weapons – great as an ultimate guarantee of national defense and sovereignty, great for national prestige, hugely risky for offense. It is not clear that North Korea can escape the same problem of practical use which so many other nuclear powers have tried to figure out. There is simply no way to use these weapons for gain that would not immediately provoke massive counter-costs.

Yet we seem to have a hard time transferring this logic to North Korea. Americans are deeply worried about war with North Korea, and our pop culture routinely portrays Pyongyang as aggressive toward the United States. Yet North Korea’s decrepit, neofeudal, gangster state probably could not even absorb a South Korean population twice its size and long accustomed to democracy and freedom, even if it could win a war.

So yes, North Korea’s nuclear weapons are unsettling, even frightening. But nuclear weapons have not been used for offense to date (barring WWII), and there is little to suggest North Korea can escape the same ‘unusability’ trap other nuclear powers find themselves in. These weapons are almost certainly for defense and deterrence, so we should respond in kind with missile defense. That, not airstrikes and a consequent huge risk of Asian regional war, is the way forward.


Filed under: Defense, Korea (North), Korea (South), Missiles/Missile Defense, Nuclear Weapons, The National Interest, United States


Robert E Kelly
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science & Diplomacy
Pusan National University

@Robert_E_Kelly

 

 


Learn Korean Ep. 94: Korean Honorifics (Part 2 of 2)

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Keykat's always hogging the internet to herself. How am I supposed to do my super important work when she's watching videos all day on her small cell phone? Well, now I took away her cell phone, so the internet should be a bit faster. It's only fair, right?

This episode will cover more about honorific speech - specifically "humble speech." We'll talk about humble verbs (such as 드리다 and 뵈다) as well as humble particles (such as 께, 께서, and 께서는).

Remember that there are free extended PDFs available for every "Learn Korean" episode (at the bottom of this post), and each contains additional information or examples not covered in the video.

Check out the episode here!

Click here to download a free PDF of this lesson!

The post Learn Korean Ep. 94: Korean Honorifics (Part 2 of 2) appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.


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interview with Stacylaughs!~

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alexx-in-wonderland:

 

hey, you guys.  it’s been a minute!  as per usual, heheh.  but guess what, i am restarting my blog and youtube channel! (yay!)  this week i’ll be making a video with Stacy Austin aka @stacylaughs about our experiences living in Korea.  it’ll be interesting because even though she has popped back over to the U.S. and come back again, she came to Korea when i did in 2010.  

if you guys have any questions for Stacy or for both of us about our experiences in Korea, please send them to me here on tumblr, or e-mail them to: alexx.in.wonderland2@gmail.com.  please send them by Thursday, 7/27 and we will be recording a video together, to talk about our experiences and answer your questions.  

for those who aren’t familiar with Stacy and want to know a bit more about here, here is a brief introduction:

Stacy Austin was born in South Korea, grew up in Portland, Oregon, and returned to Busan to teach English in 2010. Since then she’s been involved in the local community, including writing for Busan Haps Magazine, speaking on Busan e-FM radio, and performing in Vagina Monologues. As a teacher, she’s taught private academy (hagwon), elementary public school, and university students – but most recently, she’s been working remotely for a software company. 


She’s done a lot in the land of the morning calm and she’s documented a lot of it on her personal blog/website/tumblr at stacylaughs.com.


Stacy now looks forward to moving back to her hometown on the west coast. As a woman of mixed race and multiple cultures, she’s ready to see what Trump’s U.S. is like.

if you guys want to ask her anything on camera, now’s your chance.  let us know!  and i’ll see you guys on my youtube channel very soon.  much love

 

 

Alexx and I are going to have a chat tomorrow – so you have any questions for either of us about our experiences in Korea, please send them to me here on tumblr, or e-mail them to alexx.in.wonderland2@gmail.com


About 

Hi, I'm Stacy. I'm from Portland, Oregon, USA, and am currently living in Busan, South Korea. Check me out on: Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, Lastfm, and Flickr.

 


Summertime Seoul Escapes: Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju

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Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju Island South Korea Toronto Seoulcialite
 

Since ex Co-Pilot wasn’t supposed to leave the peninsula before departing for good in October, we decided to spend the 4th of July weekend in Korea.  Jeju Island is said to be the “Hawaii of South Korea”, so we hoped for blue skies and plenty of sun.  Ex Co-P decided to head out to Okinawa, Japan with his new girlfriend of 9 days (thumbing his nose at the military).  I had already requested the days that fit his schedule and a hotel with a rooftop pool and breakfast included (because hotel breakfast is more important to him than sightseeing).  Instead of a wild ride around Jeju Island, I had a relaxing stay at Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju.

Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju Hotel Regent Marine The Blue JejuJeju Island South Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Hotel Review Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju

Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju: Location

Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju is conveniently located for travelers flying in and out of Jeju International Airport. It’s only 10 minutes away by car!  Outside the hotel is a small midway with a carousel and some rides for kids.  You’ll find a BBQ chicken joint directly inside the hotel, and a convenience store right outside.  Beyond the midway is a McDonald’s (for late night eats and even later hangover breakfast).  Venture out along the boardwalk for fresh seafood, bbq, and other Korean food.

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Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju: The Room

I was very happy with the view from our first room.  Prices for a Saturday night in August start at around $100 USD.  This room could easily accomodate 3 people as there was a Queen-size bed as well as a Twin.  The bathroom had a rain shower system, advanced toilet, and plenty of counter space.  I was very happy with the view from our first room.  We looked out onto the ocean which was calm and serene.  In our second room we looked out onto the sea as well, but moreso directly into a parking lot and some basketball courts.  We had 1 bed which was absolutely mammoth.  California King with 2 comfortors?  Good for blanket hogs!

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Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju: Dining

The hotel has it’s own restaurant with breakfast included for guests.  With Korean, Chinese, and Western options, there was something to suit every palate.  They had plenty of rice, meat, fish, and even congee and dim sum.  I enjoyed their scrambled eggs with some fresh fruit and decided to indulge in a waffle with real maple syrup.   If you’re a cereal person they keep things fresh with a cereal bar at the back by all the pastries.  Various types of coffees and juices are available, too.

Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju: Pool

The pool looks directly out to the sea.  A family-friendly space, my only complaint is that it doesn’t open until 1 PM.  By 3 or 4 o’clock the sun begins to hide away on the other side of the hotel.  This is perfect for Koreans who tend to be more conscious of skin-care.  We wanted to catch some rays!  Our Sunday Funday at the pool was the perfect place to make some new friends and get a tan in our short, sunny window.  No diving!

Fitness Center Hotel Regent Marine Blue Jeju Island South Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Fitness Center Hotel Regent Marine Blue Jeju Island South Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Fitness Center Hotel Regent Marine Blue Jeju Island South Korea Toronto Seoulcialite Fitness Center Hotel Regent Marine Blue Jeju Island South Korea Toronto Seoulcialite

Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju: The Fitness Center

The fitness center at the hotel is quite small but was pretty much empty the entire time I was there.  The machines look quite new.  You’ll certainly have your pick of what to watch on their giant TV screens which have several English channels as well as the standard Korean top picks.

BUSINESS HOURS
Monday – Sunday: Open 24 hours
CONTACT

ADDRESS
20 Seobudu 2-gil
Cheju, Jeju-do
South Korea
Jeju Island Sunset Hamdeok Beach

The post Summertime Seoul Escapes: Hotel Regent Marine The Blue Jeju appeared first on The Toronto Seoulcialite.


More on NK Nukes: It took the Cuban Missile Crisis before the US Adapted to Soviet Nuclear Deterrence

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9e67b42f03919f5ba59a4be37287fcb8dd8f17e0This is a re-post of something I wrote last month for The National Interest on US adaption to other countries’ nuclearization. In short, we adapted badly at first – Cuba – and then learned to live with proliferation even though we didn’t like it and did the best we could to halt it.

A repeat of the Cuban Missile Crisis over North Korea is what I fear most from the US toward North Korea in the next five or ten years. We will decide that North Korea is too batty and gangsterish to trust with nuclear weapons, and we’ll pick a fight. How the North Koreans will react – will they believe China will stand with them? – nobody knows. The Soviets felt that missilizing Cuba evened the score with the US which could easily strike the USSR at the time. The North will think the same – that they are entitled to nuclear deterrence for national security, which perception a Cuban-style crisis will reinforce in them. Then will come a showdown.

But most people agree North Korea will never give  up its nukes, and most people also agree that North Korea is quite rational. So it is quite unlikely that North Korea will launch a nuclear ICBM at the US without provocation. It sucks that North Korea has nukes, but we have learned to live with Soviet/Russian, Chinese, and Pakistani nukes. The big question is can we live with NK nukes when so many Americans seem to think the North Koreans are insane.

The full essay follows the jump:

It is increasingly clear that North Korea is driving toward a nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) which could strike the America homeland. A central question for war and peace in East Asia then, is how the Americans will respond if or, more likely at this point, when North Korea achieves this capability.

America’s Tough Historical Reactions

History suggests a tough American response. Major strategic changes tend to provoke an American effort. In 1962, the Soviet placement of nuclear missiles in Cuba provoked the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the US response brought the world to the brink of nuclear war. Rather than reading the Cuban missiles as Soviet equality with the US ability to strike the Soviet homeland (as the Kremlin read the move), the Kennedy administration read the emplacement as a major challenge which even war would be worth risking to roll back.

It is easy to imagine a similar American response to a North Korean nuclear ICBM. The North is practically a comic book villain in American popular opinion and culture. In the last few years, North Korea invaded the United States (twice), captured the White House, and produced a take-over-world Bond villain. In the war-scare of this spring, 53% of Americans supported striking North Korea to stop its nuclear program, even though it does not even have the ability to hit the US now. It is easy to see that already-majoritarian number rising as a North Korean ICBM comes into view.

Two other examples leap to mind: In 1941, the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor ignited a massive American military effort that ended with nuclear attack on Japan. Similarly, the 9/11 surprise attack lead to enormous, still continuing American military exertion in the Middle East. A North Korean nuclear capability to strike the US homeland might well be read as giving it just such a surprise attack capability given how dismally Americans view North Korea (86% unfavorability). A North Korea capable of nuking the US homeland would almost certainly be read by hawks in Congress, neoconservatives, and much of the public as a major threat, possibly justifying preventative attack.

Learning to Live with a North Korean Nuclear Weapon

I have argued before in these pages that North Korea probably does not want to attack the United States. Its officials have repeatedly told the world that it seeks nuclear weapons to prevent American-led regime change on the model of Iraq or Libya. And indeed, the US is a pretty obvious threat to the North Korean leadership. The US has sought to isolate North Korea for decades, threatened it with a major war in 1994, placed it on an ‘axis of evil’ in 2001, lead the sanctions charge in the ensuing years, and so on. It is not therefore surprising that North Korea has sought nuclear weapons, just as various other rogues – Hussein’s Iraq, Iran, Syria, Kaddifi’s Libya, apartheid South Africa – have.

In each case, an isolated, beleaguered regime considered the world’s ultimate weapons in pursuit of ultimate security: no country will attack you, no matter how awful you are, if you can credibly threaten nuclear retaliation. That logic is practically unassailable, however loathsome we find the states pursuing these weapons. The difference between North Korea and these other horribles is that Pyongyang has actually gotten to a nuke. No other rogue has; only nine states – the US, Russia, China, France, Britain, Israel, Pakistan, India, and North Korea – have hurdled this high bar.

So nuclear weapons are a wise choice for North Korea’s elite, no matter what we think of the regime. It seeks them for the same reason all rogues do – regime security. We can insist, as we do, that we will never recognize North Korea as a nuclear weapons state. But it is, whether we like it or not. We also probably cannot stop the North Korean march to a nuclear ICBM, barring a huge, risky air campaign that might not even work and would be practically indistinguishable from a war.

The US-North Korea Countdown

So we are facing a countdown, a ticking clock of sorts, that ends with a verified North Korean ability to strike the continental United States with a nuclear weapon, possibly a hydrogen bomb, atop an ICBM. No really knows when the North Koreans will get there. They lie so much that I am loathe to believe their claims that this is imminent. Other, more credible numbers thrown around suggest five to ten years. But whenever it might be, it is almost certainly coming. Constant nuclear and missile testing, plus the regime’s own words, suggest it is aiming for a nuclear ICBM with the explicit purpose of threatening the US homeland.

So what to do? Hopefully we can delay the program. Cyber action might slow it, as it did the Iranian program. Missile defense helps too. And China might finally take this seriously and realize that clamping down on North Korea is wiser than risking a panicked American over-reaction when North Korea breaches this barrier. But given China’s almost willful obtuseness on North Korea, this is unlikely.

The choice then will be to either adapt or fight (air strikes). The US did adapt, post-Cuba, to a Soviet ability to nuke the US homeland, and more generally, it has lived with Soviet/Russian and Chinse nuclear deterrence for decades. And South Korea and Japan have adapted to the Northern threat already (although not enough). But the US seems to me more prone to anxiety if not hysteria regarding North Korea. President Trump himself insisted that he will not permit the North to achieve such a weapon – and the only way to do that is a major conflict. This choice is coming soon.


Filed under: Korea (North), Missiles/Missile Defense, Nuclear Weapons, Preemption, United States


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