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Dongdaemun vs Namdaemun: The Face Off

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Namdaemun Market Dongdaemun Market

Dongdaemun Market and Namdaemun Market are arguably some of the most famous tourist spots in Korea, and for good reasons.

Dongdaemun“in Korean means the east gate while “Namdaemun means the south gate. These two gates used to surround the walls of city of Seoul in the past, and now they are home to two of the largest and most popular markets in Korea.

Even for Koreans, the difference between the two markets are not very obvious, and this article will attempt to collate and summarize the key differences between the two markets, and how you can make best use of your time and resources while you’re there.

1. Price

27255278661_d8b69505b9_bObviously, travelers will take price into their consideration when shopping. In general, Dongdaemun Market has a huge array of shopping malls such as Doota or Migliore, which offer much cleaner and modern facilities and display, but also higher prices compared to the street vendors.남대문2While Namdaemun Market also has indoor malls, they are nearly nowhere as modern as the ones in Dongdaemun Market and they are usually for wholesalers- hence prices are generally lower. As for street vendors or underground markets in both markets, prices are generally comparable, so make sure you bargain well (prices are usually fixed in shopping malls such as Doota, so less likelihood of bargaining there).

In addition, Namdaemun Market is generally targeted a bit towards wholesale shoppers (there are of course consumer retail items), while Dongdaemun Market is targeted slightly more towards retail shopping.

2. Location

map.jpgNamdaemun Market is located near Hoehyeon Station on Subway Line 4 (Exit #5) whereas Dongdaemun is directly connected to the subway station called Dongdaemun History & Culture Park Station on Subway Line 4 and 1.16490494656_b0dcb32bbd_bNamdaemun Market is very close to Myeongdong (about 10 minutes by foot), so if you’d like to immerse in a full day of shopping, make sure you visit both places together since they’re nearby.23568773782_1474fd220d_bDongdaemun Market spans quite widely across the area so you can alight at either Dongdaemun Station (Lines 1 and 4), or the Dongdaemun History and Culture Park Station (Lines 2, 4 and 5).

3. Getting Around 

Both markets are incredibly large in scale and so it’s not that easy to get around, especially if you don’t speak or read Korean (many of the signs are in Korean).4717190696_38a7f4abcb_b.jpgIn general, Namdaemun Market is more “organized”. The streets and alleyways of the market are categorized and somewhat sorted so you can find what you want much faster, which makes it much easier for you to compare the price of the product that you would like to purchase. One thing to note, however, is that many of the shops at Namdaemun Market are not that interested in selling goods to tourists as they are more into bulk sales.

There are countless outdoor street vendors in both markets and they are more targeted toward retail sale.6234353630_16599c3d1c_bWhile Dongdaemun’s main market isn’t as organised or categorized, if you just stay within the shopping malls (Doota or Migliore), it will be a much more convenient for you to shop.

Within the malls, everything is much more organised and you can probably find things that you want much more easily.

Namdaemun Market Dongdaemun Market

In the end, it probably comes to what kind of experience you want. Namdaemun has much more of the “traditional market” feel, so if it’s more of the experience (or photographic opportunities) you’re after, Namdaemun is the ideal place for you. But if your main aim is to shop for more affordable Korean clothes and cosmetics, you’re probably better off visiting the malls at Dongdaemun.

4. Nearby Attractions

17851972449_9188334662_bAfter looking around these two markets, stop by the attractions that are nearby. Near Namdaemun Market is “Sungnyemun Gate“, one of the three major gateways through the walls of Seoul in the past. It is designated as the first National Treasure of South Korea. For more information, click here.13461828795_aae229c8b7_bIn the heart of Dongdaemun Market is Dondaemun Design Plaza (DDP) is an iconic landmark of Seoul, which has been designed as a cultural hub for people of all ages. For more information, click here.allowto_snap_411See Insider Shopping Tips for Dongdaemun Market You Won’t Find Elsewhere! or check out the ultimate list of shopping malls and shops in Dondaemun Market on Trazy.com, Korea’s #1 Travel Shop!button_main

Photo Credits
IMG_0195 via photopin (license)
남대문시장 15 via photopin (license)
Dongdaemun Market via photopin (license)
Dongdaemun Design Plaza & Park via photopin (license)
DSC08277 via photopin (license)
Korea_Lotte_Fitin_Dongdaemun_05 via photopin (license)
palace via photopin (license)
NIGHT SEOUL ● Eulji-ro via photopin (license)
동대문역사문화공원역 사거리 via photopin (license)
斗山塔 via photopin (license)



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a service for travelers to easily share and discover the latest hip & hot travel spots from all over the world. 
We are currently focusing on Korea as our destination and plan to expand to other countries gradually. 


How to Say ‘Oh My God’ in Korean

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Life is full of surprises and shocks, and being able to show your surprise is very important! One way to show your surprise is to say ‘oh my god’ or some variant of that phrase such as ‘oh my gosh’.

This article will show you how to say ‘oh my god’ in Korean. Like in English, there are several ways to say it. We’ll show you how!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘Oh my god!’ in Korean Overview

Oh My God in Korean

The most common way of saying ‘oh my god’ in Korean is 세상에 (sesange). This comes from the word 세상 (sesang), which means ‘world’ (another, more common word for ‘world’ is세계 [segye]). 세상에 can be interpreted more literally as something like ‘never in the whole world would I have expected that’.

Another expression sometimes used to say ‘oh my god’ is 맙소사! (mapsosa!). You may see this often in Korean subtitles in movies.

The word 이런 (ireon), which usually means ‘this’, can also be used to mean ‘oh my god’ in Korean. Its more literal meaning would be something like ‘how can this happen?’ or ‘how did it come to this?’

The English phrase ‘Oh my god’ is well known in Korean, and often it is used instead of a Korean word. When it is written in Korean, it becomes 오 마이 갓 (o mai gat) and it is pronounced in such a way by Koreans. This expression is also the basis of several Korean puns due to its similarity in sound to the word ‘mother’s’ (엄마의 – eommai). One example is the pun ‘엄마의 가스레인지’ (eommai gaseu reinji).

The sounds 오모 (omo) and 헐 (heol) can also sometimes be translated to ‘oh my god’ in some situations, often when there is some slight disappointment or concern due to something going wrong.

 

Sample Sentences

Standard ‘Oh My God’ in Korean

Standard Oh My God in Korean

You should use this phrase when speaking to people you don’t know well or who are older than you.

For example:

맙소사! 전 몰라요. (Mapsosa! Jeon mollayo.)

Oh my god! I don’t know!

오 이런, 제가 이러지 마요. (O ireon, jega ireoji mayo)

Oh my God, don’t do this to me.

 

Informal ‘Oh My God’ in Korean

Standard Oh My god in Korean

You can use this phrase with those younger than you or the same age who you are on familiar terms with.

For example: 

세상에 내가 사람을 죽였어 (sesange naega sarameul jukyeosseo)

Oh my god, I just killed a man.

오 이런, 내가 방금 너의 칫솔을 사용했어. (o ireon, naega banggeum neoui chitsoleul sayonghaesseo)

Oh my god, I just used your toothbrush.

맙소사, 난 이 일 싫어 (mapsosa, nan I il shileo)

Oh my god, I hate this job.

오 이런, 너 진지한 거야? (o ireon, neo jinjihan geoya?)

Oh my god, are you serious?

 

A Word of Caution About Using Romanization

As you can see from the example of ‘oh my god’ when written in Korean, the sounds of the Korean language are different from the English language. The best way to be able to sound like a Korean is to learn the Korean Alphabet (Hangeul). That way, you can notice the different sounds used in Korean and get used to how Korean sounds. Learning Hangeul is very easy; it can be done in just a couple of hours!

If you want to learn some more essential phrases, check out this article or try our full Korean course.

 

‘Oh My God’ in Korean Wrap Up

Oh My God in Korean Wrap Up

Now that you know how to say ‘oh my god’ in Korean, let us know what things shock you and make you want to say ‘oh my god’ in Korean.

 

*Want more Korean phrases? Go to our Korean Phrases Page for a complete list!


Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

Korean lessons   *  Korean Phrases    *    Korean Vocabulary *   Learn Korean   *    Learn Korean alphabet   *   Learn Korean fast   *  Motivation    *   Study Korean  

 


Please share, help Korean spread! 
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From Day to Night at Korea’s Historic Hwaseong Fortress in Suwon (PHOTOS)

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Suwon Hwaseong Fortress

A UNESCO-designated cultural heritage site everyone must visit at least once in their lifetime. 

8973624792_416b0bdc78_b“Hwaseong Fortress represents the pinnacle of 18th-century military architecture, incorporating the best scientific ideas from Europe and East Asia.” – UNESCO

Every year, thousands of visitors flock to Suwon City, in Gyeonggi Province that is just south of Seoul, to admire the beauty of Hwaseong Fortress. But if you visit this year, it is going to be even more fantastic!

In celebration of its 220th anniversary, the city has designated 2016 as the ‘Visit Suwon Hwaseong Year‘ and plenty of cultural events and programs will be held for both local and international visitors to Hwaseong Fortress.
17193132923_22d146e004_bRegarded as the most outstanding and well-preserved fortress in South Korea, the beauty and grandeur of Hwaseong Fortress is incomparable to other fortresses in the country.

Built in the late 18th century, this magnificent structure is treasured for its cultural and historical values and thus was designated as UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997. For more details and directions, click here.8973532394_a4d988261a_bRegarded as the most outstanding and well-preserved fortress in South Korea, its beauty and grandeur truly is incomparable to other fortresses in the country.

When the sun is still up, make sure you take your time to take in every aspect of Hwaseong Fortress. Learn about its historical background and what each structure is built for. Try various traditional activities like the traditional archery for instance. It costs 1,000 KRW per 5 arrows.8124811640_fc9c912433_b17813259295_ae57614004_bAnd when the sun goes down, enjoy the Moonlight Tour!5300039094_9d807b8cb8_bJust like the special night time openings of the royal palaces in Seoul, Suwon Hwaseong and Hwaseong Haenggung Palace (located inside the fortress), are open to public at night until July 17. 5299443415_94f9ab67a6_bThe available dates for the Moonlight Tour in June are 16, 17, 18 and 19 and in July are 15, 16 and 17. Tickets cost 20,000 won and must be purchased in advance at interpark.com. If you need any help, call +82-1544-1555.5300039786_99dffc5005_b5300041480_3b36ec9f25_bDuring this special cultural period, you can take in the night view of the Haengggung Palace and Hwaseong Fortress and enjoy various traditional performances. The performances will be held from 19:50 until 22:10.
5300042354_eca875a180_bNow, if you are interested in visiting Hwaseong Fortress in Suwon and want to check out other attractions nearby, click here. If you need a transport service, it is available here.

Whether it’s day or night, you’ll find a truly beautiful sight to behold during your time in Suwon. So all you have to do is go.button31.png

Photo Credits
DSCF2198 – Paldalmun, porte sud de la forteresse Hwaseong, Suwon via photopin (license)
DSCF2277 via photopin (license)
hwaseong fortress 15 via photopin (license)
suwon_20150512_48.jpg via photopin (license)
suwon_20150512_74 Panorama.jpg via photopin (license)
DSC_0685 via photopin (license)
DSC_0312 via photopin (license)
DSC_0255 via photopin (license)
DSC_0264 via photopin (license)
DSC_0281 via photopin (license)



June is Pride!

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Apologies. Graduate school has kept me away from blogging. I'm not going to promise returning to regular blogging soon, because I am about to graduate and move to Boston to start a new job! My husband (did I mention we got married :-D) will be spending his summer in Seattle for an internship before finishing up in San Diego. So I have a busy month ahead of me.

However, everything is all settled down, I will be getting into a routine for Korean language study and blog writing. My new job does not involve anything queer or Korean, so I have to be vigilant in retaining my language skills and providing information to my dear (queer?) readers.



Anyway, June is pride month! Happy pride! Korea's pride festival is begining this Saturday June 11th. The main pride parade will be on Saturday from 11 AM to 7 PM in Seoul plaza, with estimates for the parade starting around 4:30. That night there will b a private beach official party on SEvit-Seom (one of the artificial islands on the Han River0 beginning at 10 pm. Check out KQCF's website for more information.

The film festival goes from June 16th (Thursday) to the 19th (Sunday). Screenings are at the Lotte Cinema Broadway Hall near Sinsa Station. More information about the films can be found at the KQFF's website. (That website though is pretty messy on their English language page...)

Hope you have a great pride month! 

 


UC Berkeley Korean Studies Students Present At Seoul National University

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Group Photo

Students from the University of California, Berkeley recently traveled to South Korea to receive helpful suggestions on their research from Seoul National University professors at the 4th SNU-UC Berkeley Korean Studies Graduate Student Conference.

Korea FM attended the event & spoke with student presenters Ming Curran & Rachel Lim about their research as well as UC Berkeley Center for Korean Studies Faculty Chair Professor Laura Nelson about the differences between researching Korean Studies in South Korea & the United States.

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 Interview answers, both in written & audio form, have been edited for length & clarity.

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The post UC Berkeley Korean Studies Students Present At Seoul National University appeared first on Korea FM.


My Take on Trump and Asia for Newsweek Japan: He’s Too Lazy to Push for Real Change, so Don’t Worry

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2016.6.14号(6/ 7発売)

I write a monthly column for Newsweek Japan, and below is this month’s English original (on pages 36-37 of the edition pictured).

I haven’t written much about Trump, mostly because he says so little of value in my area, nor do I believe that he really means what he says, because he changes so often and puts so little thought into foreign policy.

So my first comment to Asians who ask is: relax, because even if he wins, he isn’t likely to push through some major geopolitical retrenchment, because of the effort that would take in Washington. Nor is he likely to spark a huge trade war with China for the same reason. The bureaucratic resistance would be massive, and I don’t buy it at all that Trump has the tenacity, focus, intelligence, or interest in any policy issue necessary to undo long-standing precedents such as the decades-old US engagement in Asia.

If Obama can’t get us out of the Middle East, do you really believe Trump will take us out of Asia? Forget it. Perhaps it is the teacher in me, but, like Regan, Bush 2, Palin, and Fox before him, Trump’s defining intellectual feature is laziness, and it will take a helluva lot of work to change the US architecture out here. So forget it. Instead, think about what Trump really cares about – his show-boating, made-for-TV image as manly, tough, a winner, and so on.

President Trump will spend all his time and energy chasing whatever the polls say voters want in a desperate effort to stay popular. What he will really use US government power for, where he will show genuine commitment and focus, is in pursuing his media enemies Nixon-style, and enhancing his business interests. In that sense, he will govern like the CPP or Putin – chasing after journalists, feathering his nest, changing laws and regulations that damage his businesses, and so on.

So don’t worry Asia. Trump is too intellectually lazy to learn, too uniformed to understand, and too narcissistic to care. Trump is a threat to the First Amendment and check-and-balances, not the American architecture in Asia.

My essay follows the jump.

 

As of early May, Donald Trump has become the presumptive nominee of the Republication party for the presidential race this fall. Most polls show him losing to Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, but a major shock, such as a Paris/Brussels-style terrorist attack in the West, could lift him to victory. Asian elites are starting to pay attention to his foreign policy pronouncements, and Trump appears to be promising radical change.

I say ‘appears’ however, because Trump is both protean and noticeably ignorant in his policy beliefs. It is highly likely that Trump will change his positions once in office, because his over-riding goal in office will be grandiose self-promotion and re-election, not policy or ideology. He will treat his presidency as a popularity contest and so will likely choose the paths of least resistance or whatever policies poll well. Any new policy toward Asia may well be abandoned if resistance to it is significant, or if his disinterest and ignorance undermine the needed presidential will to push major change. Trump simply may not have the impulse-control and mental discipline in order to push deep changes on long-standing structures like the American architecture in the Pacific.

Assuming he does though, his foreign policy beliefs now deserve some examination in Asia. Trump’s driving forces seem be an ‘America First’ nationalism, and the curious notion that any diplomatic ‘deal’ is automatically a zero-sum game in which the winner is ‘ripping off’ (a favorite Trump verb) the loser.

America First

Most politicians are nationalist of course, but the expression ‘America First,’ which Trump uses, dates back to the interwar period (1919-1939). It signals a disinterest in US involvement in foreign alliances and conflicts, hostility to non-European immigration, and a rejection of US global hegemony. In this way, Trump would be a radical break from US policy since World War II. Every American president since Franklin Roosevelt (1933-45) has embraced a global role for the US and supported if not expanded the architecture of that role – alliances, bases, international organizations, the use of American military power far from its shores, free trade, a globalized US dollar, and so on.

American elites are nearly monolithic in their support for an internationalist foreign policy of American leadership. No major political figure in the US advocates sustained US retrenchment. Indeed just a decade ago, it was the aggressive, almost imperial, neoconservative vision of American power that dominated the Republican party. Were Trump to try to undo US deep, global engagement, it would be a gigantic, unprecedented shift in US grand strategy.

Better Deals

Besides this rejection of postwar internationalism, Trump also seem have taken from his New York real estate career the position that negotiations are never positive-sum and that ‘losing’ in such a deal is sign of weakness and stupidity. Trump’s discussion of trade and overseas basing particularly illustrates this zero-sum mindset.

Trump insists that trade has winners and losers, and that the US is regularly losing (to China, Mexico, Japan, and so on). He has hinted at leaving NAFTA and would almost certainly abandon the Tran-Pacific Partnership in favor of bilateral negotiations in which the US would use market access to force terms on trade partners. He speaks similarly of US basing, where he routinely insists that US allies need to pay more for US military assistance. He has threatened US withdrawal if payment is not forthcoming. This discussion has included Japan, where Trump has suggested that Japan develop nuclear weapons so that it might defend itself against North Korea and China.

This too would dramatically reorient US strategy. Since the war, the US has broadly supported free trade and usually lead on trade deals such as the creation of the World Trade Organization. Similarly, I can think of no US figure who has ever conceived of US alliance relationships in mercenary terms with a strong emphasis on getting paid.

Where did This Come From?

Trump is a terrible messenger for these ideas. His buffonishness, authoritarianism, crypto-racism, and staggering ignorance make him an appalling candidate. But he did win the Republican primary, and he has connected with the white working class in the United States as no candidate has in more than a generation.

When he complains about globalization destroying jobs, he is channeling the anxiety of poor and lower income Americans who have seen blue-collar jobs disappear. When he seeks to halt illegal immigration, he reflects blue-collar anxiety over cheap labor and cultural alienation. When he insists that the US get a better deal for its military commitments, he is reflecting the widespread post-Iraq belief that the US fights unnecessary wars.

Educated white collar professionals, whose preferences US foreign policy now reflect, dislike this message. Free trade means cheap imports for China. The US global architecture means they can travel, speak English, and use the dollar. Immigration brings a cultural diversity they enjoy rather than find threatening. But these views have been obviously over-represented in US politics for decades. Globalism has created an anxious lower middle class in the United States, and Trump is the great explosion of their anger.

As of early May, Donald Trump has become the presumptive nominee of the Republication party for the presidential race this fall. Most polls show him losing to Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, but a major shock, such as a Paris/Brussels-style terrorist attack in the West, could lift him to victory. Asian elites are starting to pay attention to his foreign policy pronouncements, and Trump appears to be promising radical change.

I say ‘appears’ however, because Trump is both protean and noticeably ignorant in his policy beliefs. It is highly likely that Trump will change his positions once in office, because his over-riding goal in office will be grandiose self-promotion and re-election, not policy or ideology. He will treat his presidency as a popularity contest and so will likely choose the paths of least resistance or whatever policies poll well. Any new policy toward Asia may well be abandoned if resistance to it is significant, or if his disinterest and ignorance undermine the needed presidential will to push major change. Trump simply may not have the impulse-control and mental discipline in order to push deep changes on long-standing structures like the American architecture in the Pacific.

Assuming he does though, his foreign policy beliefs now deserve some examination in Asia. Trump’s driving forces seem be an ‘America First’ nationalism, and the curious notion that any diplomatic ‘deal’ is automatically a zero-sum game in which the winner is ‘ripping off’ (a favorite Trump verb) the loser.

America First

Most politicians are nationalist of course, but the expression ‘America First,’ which Trump uses, dates back to the interwar period (1919-1939). It signals a disinterest in US involvement in foreign alliances and conflicts, hostility to non-European immigration, and a rejection of US global hegemony. In this way, Trump would be a radical break from US policy since World War II. Every American president since Franklin Roosevelt (1933-45) has embraced a global role for the US and supported if not expanded the architecture of that role – alliances, bases, international organizations, the use of American military power far from its shores, free trade, a globalized US dollar, and so on.

American elites are nearly monolithic in their support for an internationalist foreign policy of American leadership. No major political figure in the US advocates sustained US retrenchment. Indeed just a decade ago, it was the aggressive, almost imperial, neoconservative vision of American power that dominated the Republican party. Were Trump to try to undo US deep, global engagement, it would be a gigantic, unprecedented shift in US grand strategy.

Better Deals

Besides this rejection of postwar internationalism, Trump also seem have taken from his New York real estate career the position that negotiations are never positive-sum and that ‘losing’ in such a deal is sign of weakness and stupidity. Trump’s discussion of trade and overseas basing particularly illustrates this zero-sum mindset.

Trump insists that trade has winners and losers, and that the US is regularly losing (to China, Mexico, Japan, and so on). He has hinted at leaving NAFTA and would almost certainly abandon the Tran-Pacific Partnership in favor of bilateral negotiations in which the US would use market access to force terms on trade partners. He speaks similarly of US basing, where he routinely insists that US allies need to pay more for US military assistance. He has threatened US withdrawal if payment is not forthcoming. This discussion has included Japan, where Trump has suggested that Japan develop nuclear weapons so that it might defend itself against North Korea and China.

This too would dramatically reorient US strategy. Since the war, the US has broadly supported free trade and usually lead on trade deals such as the creation of the World Trade Organization. Similarly, I can think of no US figure who has ever conceived of US alliance relationships in mercenary terms with a strong emphasis on getting paid.

Where did This Come From?

Trump is a terrible messenger for these ideas. His buffonishness, authoritarianism, crypto-racism, and staggering ignorance make him an appalling candidate. But he did win the Republican primary, and he has connected with the white working class in the United States as no candidate has in more than a generation.

When he complains about globalization destroying jobs, he is channeling the anxiety of poor and lower income Americans who have seen blue-collar jobs disappear. When he seeks to halt illegal immigration, he reflects blue-collar anxiety over cheap labor and cultural alienation. When he insists that the US get a better deal for its military commitments, he is reflecting the widespread post-Iraq belief that the US fights unnecessary wars.

Educated white collar professionals, whose preferences US foreign policy now reflect, dislike this message. Free trade means cheap imports for China. The US global architecture means they can travel, speak English, and use the dollar. Immigration brings a cultural diversity they enjoy rather than find threatening. But these views have been obviously over-represented in US politics for decades. Globalism has created an anxious lower middle class in the United States, and Trump is the great explosion of their anger.


Filed under: Alliances, Asia, Domestic Politics, Foreign Policy, Newsweek, Pivot, Republican Party, United States

Robert E Kelly
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science & Diplomacy
Pusan National University
robertkelly260@hotmail.com

 


107 Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers

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facebook-groups-for-ESL-Teachers

If you’re looking for Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers, you’ve come to the right place. I’ve compiled 107 of them in one place so you can stop wasting your time searching around in Facebook. Happy Facebooking! And, please comment below and tell me if I’ve missed any of the big ones. I’ll add them in and give you credit if you’d like.

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers Looking for Jobs

ESL + EFL Industry Jobs

EFL/ESL/TEFL Jobs Wordwide

TEFL ESL Teachings Jobs in Asia

Jobs in Taiwan

ESL Jobs in China and Taiwan

ESL Jobs in China

China ESL Jobs

Hanoi English Teaching Jobs

Jobs in TESOL

My TEFL Job

Facebook Groups for ESL Looking for Jobs in South Korea

Job Seekers in Korea

ESL Teaching Jobs in Korea

Jobs in Seoul

Jobs in Bundang

Teaching Jobs in Ulsan

Daegu Jobs

Suwon Job Board

Facebook Groups for Lesson Plans, Activities and Resources

Teaching English: Activities, Lessons, etc.

Resources for ESL/EFL Teachers

Resources for English Teachers

ESL Ideas, Activities and Lesson Plans

ESL Games and Activities

Marks English TEFL Classroom

TEFL Lesson Exchange

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers-General

ESL Teachers Abroad

Innovative Teachers of English

TEFL English Teacher’s Network

TEFL Teachers

ESL Teachers

EFL + ESL Industry Network

Teaching English Abroad

International Association of English Teachers

Teach English Abroad Network

Association of Teachers of English

ESL Teachers’ Coffeehouse

All Things EFL, ESL, TESOL

Perfect English Teachers

Global English TESOL

TEFL Network

TEFL English Teachers Wordwide

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers of Young Learners

ESL/EFL Preschool Teachers

TEYL

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers-Further Education

CELTA

CELTA: Graduates

Cambridge DELTA Forum

Anaheim University TESOL

TESOL Online

International TEFL Academy Alumni

TEFL Worldwide Prague

Oxford TEFL Prague

TEFL International Barcelona

U of Birmingham South Korea

Oxford TESOL Dip TESOL Group

Facebook Groups for Online ESL Teachers

Online English Teachers

Make a Living Teaching Online

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers in Korea

Foreign Teachers in Korean Universities

Seoul English Teachers

Korea ESL Teachers

Daegu English Teachers

English Teachers in the Suwon Area

E2 Visa Holders in Korea

Female TESOLers in Korea

Facebook Groups for EPIK and GEPIK Teachers in Korea

KorVia EPIK

EPIK in Andong

Busan EPIK

EPIK Jeju Teachers

Geoje EPIK

KorVia GEPIK

GEPIK Lesson Plans

Hwaseong/Osan GEPIK Teachers

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers, Asia (Except Korea)

Teaching English in Taiwan

Kaohsiung English Teachers

ESL Teachers-Philippines

Community of Friendly Filippino English Teachers

Vietnam ESL teachers

TESOL talks Vietnam

English Teachers in Hanoi

How to Teach English in Japan

Teach English in China

English Teachers in China

TEFL-Indonesia

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers in Europe

English Teachers in Spain

TEFL Barcelona

Barcelona TEFL Teachers

English Teachers in Valencia

Teaching English in Italy

TESOL France

Teachers in Czech Republic

TEFL Teachers in Seville

IATEFL Hungary

IATEFL Poland

TEFLers in Greece

TESOL Greece

Cyclades Teachers Hub

TESOL Macedonia

MELTA-Moscow

TESOL Ukraine

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers in Central/South America

English Teachers in Colombia

English Teachers in Brazil

Chilean Teachers of English

ELT Peru

Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers in the Middle East

Saudi Arabian Teaching Positions

English Teachers of Egypt

Teaching English in Oman

TESOL, Yemen

TESOL Jordan

TESOL Syria

And so ends our list of 107 Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers. Did I miss any of the big ones? Please comment below and let me know.

The post 107 Facebook Groups for ESL Teachers appeared first on .


Jackie Bolen: How to Get a University Job In Korea

Amazon
amazon.com/How-Get-University-South-Korea-ebook/dp/B00ORLRP2Y 

My Life! Teaching in a Korean University
eslteacherinkorea.blogspot.com

University Jobs Koreauniversityjobkorea.com

YouTube: youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL0Q8kr18oQIo12jZrwIUdnU4C6eJV5rK


 


4 months to being legally married

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I'm at the stage where it's too late for regrets. 

There are days I wake up and wonder if this is the right choice, the right time or the right guy. There are days I have doubts about this whole marriage and it makes me very afraid. 

Why is my wedding planning filled with stress, unease and uncertainty?

Candidly Kate: Where to Teach in Korea

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In a country the size of Indiana, you would think that the two largest cities would have similar lifestyles.  After spending a year in Busan I thought I had conquered Korea enough to hit the capital.  Could I have been more wrong?

There are countless benefits to living in both cities, and there are benefits to the EPIK and GEPIK programs (chill days maxing out at 5 or 6 classes, and TONS of vacation time!) in each.  Public School positions are becoming scarce (and only hire at specific times of year), so most people end up having to at least consider picking up and shipping out for a hagwon (Private School) position.

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Busan – The Good:

Busan is ridiculously beautiful.  The mountains and the beach come together in perfect harmony so you may hike and swim in the same day.  My first year was in Busan, as many of you may already know.  March 2015- March 2016  was a pretty relaxed year where I got to sleep in or work out on Mondays and Wednesdays.  I started at 12 PM, taught from 12:45 PM – 2 PM, sometimes had a meeting from 2 PM – 2:30 PM then was free until 3:30 PM after which time I would teach through until 7:30 PM.  Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday I would arrive at 9:30 AM and teach from 10 AM through until 12 PM.  After 12 PM I had free time until 3:30 PM (again, I’d teach 3:30 PM – 7:30 PM), but would usually return at 3 PM.  Yes, I had 3 hours splat in the middle of my day with which to do whatever I wanted!  Obviously the best thing for me to do was to hit the gym, so that combined with my new, active job helped me to shed the weight which had accumulated while living in Toronto for 3 years and working (for the most part) in the Food/ Beverage/ Hospitality industry.  I was also way more relaxed as I was able to get tons of sleep!

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Busan -The Bad:

I had far too much free time and not enough to do.  Some weekends I’d find myself just staying in and watching movies on Sundays because it was cold (seriously – Busan in the late fall through until the early spring is COLD).  That’s a great way to save money, but it’s not very exciting.  Summers in Busan were amazing – I was at the beach every weekend.  Was it intellectually stimulating?  Not exactly.  Was it blissful, chilled out, maxin’, relaxin’ good times?  Most definitely.

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Busan – The Ugly:

I live horrendously far from everything.  Hwamyeong is a new city nestled beside the Nakdong river (the only thing separating me from Gimhae) and just south of Yangsan (basically an entirely different city from Busan).  It took at least 45 minutes to get anywhere cool (Seomyeon, PNU, Gwangan, Haeundae [don’t even bother]).  We took expensive cabs constantly just because the thought of spending that lengthy a time on public transit, particularly during rush hour, was out of the question.  At the same time, rush hour traffic was just as bad (if not worse), so sometimes the idea of going out and socializing was just not fathomable.  I also found that the community of foreigners was very cliquey.  If you wanted any opportunity to perform you had to either be really pushy or have excellent timing.  I just didn’t have the energy to be demanding, and so I got to sing live exactly twice, and the song was certainly not of my choosing.  Lots of drama occurred because there were tons of expats, but it was almost like a small town.  Everyone knew everyone else’s business, and for what?  Seoul so far hasn’t given me that small town or high school vibe.  That could always change, but I don’t get the impression it will anytime soon in the teacher community (bloggers [*ahem* YouTubers!] are always another story!).  Location is key, especially if you don’t want to be lonely or bored in Korea!

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Seoul – The Good:

I feel like every neighbourhood in Seoul is jampacked full of things to do.  There are more temples to see (and palaces, which Busan doesn’t actually have), galleries and museums to explore, music venues and concert halls out the wazoo, and tons of sporting events.  There isn’t a beach per se, but there are various rivers (the Han in particular is a favourite) where you can go lay out.  While I’m not in a traditionally “popular” area (Sincheon – by Jamsil), there are tons of places to take dance lessons, noraebang your heart out, hit the gym, go shopping (there are tons of places for “Western Sizes” here, and you’ll find more accessible salon supply stores if you’re blonde), amuse yourself at Lotte World, or even try your hand at the batting cages or the gun range.  It’s perfectly acceptable to walk across either of the bridges into Gangnam, where a whole slew of other exciting adventures await.  I’m about $10 by cab from Itaewon (40 minutes by subway), and a straight ride on the green line to Dongdaemun Design Plaza.  I can walk to a baseball game after work or any of the fantastic parks in my area.  I haven’t met any other musicians with whom I can jam just yet, but I’ve had plenty of acting opportunities and have been welcomed into the blogger community (as well as Girls Love Travel – Korea) with open arms.

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The dating scene is more interesting.  There – I said it.  There are plenty of attractive teachers in Busan, but that’s just it…they’re almost ALL teachers.  You might meet someone from a neighbouring city who is working as an engineer or who is in the military, but realistically it’s very likely you’ll be dating another teacher if you want to keep things local to Busan.  In Seoul you’ll meet a ton of people who travel here constantly for business, full-time actors, models, athletes, military, students, and yes – teachers.  Having more options enables you to meet a much more diverse crowd.  My life has definitely not been boring, I’ve met a ton of cool people, and have been on some really cool and different dates!

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There are countless opportunities to gets involved in Seoul, and I intend to take advantage of each one!  On the other hand, I need to stop it with all this delicious international food…

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Seoul – The Bad:

I have ZERO downtime.  I am constantly on the go.  I always have my giant bag of goodies with me in case I stay out too long and decide to crash at a jimjilbang.  I have been neglecting the gym because of exciting things to do or in favour of more sleep.  Less gym time + all this amazing food?  I haven’t put on weight, but I’m certainly no longer losing!  My job is also FAR more demanding than it ever was in Busan.  I won’t go into too many specifics, but my favourite part of my job in Busan was being able to jet right when I finished work, taking any marking or lesson planning home to review.  Here, I teach more classes and a greater variety of subjects and my prep time is limited to the end of my day (when all I want to do is GTFO!).  Responsibilities that were once shared as a team fall on my shoulders.  It’s very tiring and probably contributed most to my feelings of uncertainty and unsteadiness when I first came to Seoul.  It feels like an hour goes by much faster here than it ever did in Busan, even when completing the exact sames tasks.

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Seoul – The Ugly:

I haven’t been here long enough to get a sense of “The Ugly” quite yet, but I certainly find myself spending more than I ever did in Busan.  I’ve got flights on the books for Thailand (5 flights in 10 days), China, and Taiwan, as it’s a lot easier to travel internationally from Seoul.  Food and beverages are certainly more costly, clothes and shoes are as well, and my maintenance charge to live in a disgusting apartment is $50.  This is probably the ugliest part: my apartment.  When I moved in, the previous tenant hasn’t cleaned or replaced the light-bulbs that had burned out.  I didn’t have proper water pressure nor did I have hot water.  All that has been fixed (the landlord needed some serious prodding from my awesome Director), but it still never feels clean.  The space is also smaller than my apartment in Busan, which I don’t mind, but I wish the wallpaper weren’t so smudged and butchered.  I also wish there was some sort of storage in my unit.  Everything is always on display.  I live in a super-cool area of Seoul.  If you want to live in a convenient location, don’t expect a miracle when it comes to your accommodations.   Living in such a convenient location also has its set-backs.  I’ve had only 1 weekend without house-guests since March 8th, 2016 (it’s June 7th, 2016 – and for the record I have guests visiting this weekend as well).  It’s all a blessing, but I’m exhausted!

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Which sounds more appealing to you, the easy and laid-back life of Busan, or the fast-paced, go-go-go, never boring atmosphere of Seoul?  Right now I wish there was a bit more of a balance, but at the same time there’s nowhere I’d rather be than Seoul (hey parents – come see your daughter, will ya? xo).

 

 

 



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