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Top 5 Vegan (and Vegan-Friendly) Restaurants in Seoul

I often get many e-mails requesting recommendations for vegan eats in Korea. While I appreciate vegan food, and have had some fantastic dining experiences at vegan restaurants in the city, I'm most certainly no expert. So, I enlisted the help of someone who is. Amanda from has graciously offered to share her top five vegan (and vegan-friendly) restaurants in Seoul. Without further ado, here they are:

1. Cafe Suッkara (Sukkara) (vegan-friendly) 

My favorite vegan restaurant in Seoul is not actually a vegan restaurant, though vegan-friendly dishes and drinks feature heavily on their menu. Cafe Sukkara is nestled in a quiet, cozy, and rather nondescript building (noticeable only because of its huge, green wooden door) located between Hongdae and Sinchon. Cafe Sukkara has the perfect cafe atmosphere: dim lighting, low, comfy seats, and a completely open kitchen surrounded by bar stools. In the summertime, they slide the glass doors at the front of the cafe open, and you can enjoy your meal outside on their deck.

The cafe prides itself on using local, mostly organic, ingredients, and the menu changes seasonally. There are usually at least two vegan main dishes on offer, in addition to their always present vegan yeast bread, soup, and salad set. They also offer many vegan desserts, such as carrot cake and raw vegan cheesecake, as well as amazing drinks! I love their seasonal mojitos, made with homemade candied fruit, and their homemade ginger ale is the best I've had anywhere, with the perfect balance of sweetness and spiciness.

Filipina Wife vs. Korean Husband (Part 1)

2As a couple who lives in a marriage with two different cultures, my husband and I don’t usually see eye to eye on many things.

Yes, You Can Get That in Korea. And That. That, Too

Expats of the ROK, stop if you’ve heard this one: You can’t get “____” in Korea.

“I love Korea,” the imaginary newly-established English teacher from various western countries of the world of yesterday would say to other newly-established English teacher friends at the lone expat-friendly drinking establishment in town, over bottles of Hite because, you can’t get decent beer in Korea, and Hite’s at least better than Cass. “But, you can’t get decent cheese here. You can’t get avocados here. I would kill for some kettle-cooked chips. Powdered coffee is gross, some coffee beans would be nice. What about some toothpaste with fluoride? My teeth are going to rot out of my skull!”

3 Things you need to know about Gwangbokjeol (Aug 15), the National Liberation Day of Korea


August 15 is one of the most meaningful days to Koreans. It is Gwangbokjeol, the National Liberation Day of Korea . You can see many Korean national flags “Taegeukgi” hung in the street or on the windows of the houses.

1. Why is Gwangbokjeol so special?


Making Korean Friends and Getting a Job in Busan

Before we left the Philippines, I thought that I could easily find a job in South Korea. I heard that there’s a lot of job opportunities in Korea and the pay is really great. When I was doing my research online and reading some blogs about life in Korea, I stumbled across this website: I signed up and made my own account. I started making friends (most of them are Koreans) and now they are members of my English study group in Busan. I was also able to find a client who wanted me to tutor her kids starting September through My Korean Friends website. Isn’t it great? If you’re an expat living in Busan and wanted to meet some Korean friends, I recommend you check out My Korean Friends.

Here’s some of the photos during our study group meetups/study sessions. Our first ever meetup took place at the Aqua Place Hotel in front of Gwanganli beach. It’s kind of a meet and greet event. I prepared some fun activities for the group. We enjoyed each other’s company plus the awesome scenery outside the hotel. It was really breathtaking! Our second meetup/study session was at Cafe DropTop in Jeonpo-dong. My study group members are nice and pleasant to talk with. I love hanging out with them.


first meetup (meet and greet event)

first meetup (meet and greet event)

Who Wins: ‘Mr. Bean’ or ‘100 Angry Grandmothers’?

Hello, fellow ESL teachers. Do you have 10 minutes to kill in a class? Have you already shown your students every (currently available on YouTube) episode of the animated Mr. Bean series? Are your kids bored to death of Hangman or–in the case of South Korea–“Nunchi Game,” where they each stand up in the order of words or numbers on the board and the last one to stand is out? Do you have a class that is relatively advanced in English and can offer some creative discourse? Or, do you have a class that barely offers input at all?

Single K women overwhelmingly in support of same-sex marriage, 50% of Single men against

The matchmaking website Duo surveyed 616 people from the 25th of July to the 1st of August asking about their opinions in relation to the legalization of same-sex marriage. 69.3% of unmarried women agreed with the statement "Same-sex marriage is acceptable." while 50.2% of men were against gay marriage.

Critiquing the Jeju Forum for Peace and Prosperity

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The Jeju Peace Forum was founded in 2001 with the goal of contributing to world peace and international cooperation in the East Asian sphere through multilateral dialogue and community building. 

The 2003 edition of the conference included President Roh Muu-hyun's official apology to Jeju Island for the 4.3 massacre and the 2007 Jeju Declaration envisioned a regional peacekeeping diplomatic role for South Korea based on the Helsinki Process. 

In 2008, with the election of the hardline right-wing Lee Myung-bak government, the foreign affairs ministry changed the name of the conference to The Jeju Forum for Peace and Prosperity and shifted focus away from co-operative agreements, bringing in big name speakers on themes unrelated to the peace process.

A glance at the list of events, workshops and speakers from the 10th Forum held last May, full of washed-up politicians and discredited neoliberal economic themes, suggests a conference in search of an identity.

Darren Southcott, editor-in-chief of The Jeju Weekly magazine, joins The Korea File to discuss whether or not the Forum has stayed true to it’s roots as a regional peace initiative.

Details on the 10th edition of the Forum can be found here:

For more from Darren Southcott, check out The Jeju Weekly magazine here:

Music on this episode: 김 수 철 with '내일'

Inventions from Korea that you might not have imagined at all!

Good inventions can change the world into a better place. Items invented in Korea also have permeated into the lives of all, making our lives more convenient and more exciting. Can you guess what kind of items were invented in Korea?

invention1 1. Instant coffee mix

About 50 years ago in Korea, coffee was a luxurious drink which was mostly affordable in high class families. However, thanks to the invention of the instant coffee mix in 1976, coffee became inexpensive and people easily began to purchase it anywhere. Eventually drinking coffee got popular among the middle class and was placed as a big part of the Korean culture.

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