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EPIK Interview Questions

The Skype interview is a critical step in the EPIK application process. Below is a list of questions, provided to me by my preliminary recruiting agency, Gone2Korea, that could’ve come up during the call. I’ve also taken the liberty of adding some supporting questions/suggestions to help further prompt any future EPIK teachers who are preparing for their interviews! My actual interview only lasted 25 minutes and I was barely asked half of these questions, but it never hurts to be too prepared!

In addition to basic questions that verify your identity and prying inquiries about your medical history, during your EPIK interview you might be asked:


Bored in Korea? Read a book! Teakettle Mountain Released on Amazon



Slide1Teakettle Mountain, the story of one loser English teacher’s quest to not be a loser, has been re-released on amazon.com. Check out the story reviewers are calling “a joy to read”—available now for $2.99, less than a third the cost of a cup of coffee in our adoptive homeland!

Update: Now available for free!
Get your copy here.


The Good, The Bad, and The Hagfish

by John Bocskay


Beauty is only skin deep, but ugly lives in mud 150 meters under the sea.


I ’ve always loved the Korean word for fish: “mulgogi”, a compound formed from the words “water” (mul) and “meat” (gogi). More than simply labeling a common class of aquatic creatures, “mulgogi” suggests a way of looking at the world, a very East Asian orientation that assumes all things that swim to be edible unless proven otherwise.


Harry Potter: The Boy Who Taught English in South Korea

Back when you first decided you wanted to come to South Korea, breaking the news about your teaching-aspirations to your family was very emotional.


Korean Education: High Grades, High Pressure… Low Happiness?

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What is the point of school? To get good grades? To make friends and have fun? To teach you about life and help you to become independent? Well I think that all three things are important. Unfortunately in Korea, I have seen far too much emphasis placed on the first thing: to get good grades. Of course, it’s well known that some of the best academic results in the world come from South Korea, and Western schools could certainly learn a lesson or two from the Koreans about how to gain such success. But what the Korean Education system surely lacks is balance, and the realisation that sometimes, less is more.


Getting an EMS from Korea!

Receiving EMS from Korea has been a huge part of our long distance relationship. Besides seeing his face on skype every night, it is possibly the only joy in this miserable LDR. When he sends an EMS, the package goes from Daejeon --> Seoul (Incheon) --> Singapore (Changi Airport) --> Singpost. The whole process usually takes 2-3 working days, unless its the peak periods like Chinese/Korean New Year then it could take a week. It has taken a week before - unfortunately this one time, Kimchi boy sent it during Chinese New Year and I went crazy and called Singpost like a mad woman everyday to demand them to send me my package. Can you imagine how horrid the package smelled when it arrived at my house? (it contained Kimchi, kept at room temperature for almost a week!!!). Was amazed the delivery man did not suffocate.

Living Life The Korean Way

I’ve been living in Korea for 18 months now, enough time to get over the initial culture shock and to adapt to living the Korean lifestyle. There have been both good things- going out for dinner and getting a delicious, filling meal for under £5, and bad- fearing for your life every time you are on/ near the road because of the crazy drivers.

Here are some of the things I have become accustomed to during the last year and a half in  Korea- the good, the bad and everything in between…


Pilgrim’s Progress: A Queer Journey from Korea to America

 

 

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by Ralph Karst

met Sung-min Song (not his real name) in October, 2009, when she was an applicant to the private all-English high school where I taught English in Cheonan, South Korea.

No—that pronoun switch (his / she) was not a mistake. Keep reading.


Children Banned from (Some) Restaurants and Coffee Shops in Korea

When two restaurants in South Korea were asked to pay damages for two separate accidents involving children who were dining with their parents, some restaurants and coffee shops in South Korea started banning kids from their establishments. As expected, many parents protested. For them, the ban is nothing but a form of discrimination, not a way for restaurants to avoid mishaps and legal concerns.



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