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Monday, February 27 Korean News Update

President Park Geun-hye will not appear at the final hearing for her impeachment following protests by hundreds of thousands in Seoul over the weekend, no trace of the nerve agent that killed North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s half brother has been found at the airport where he was attacked, China is blocking access to South Korean music & dramas, & women in the ROK are pr


The 7 Worst Guys An Expat Can Date

 

Expat Dating - That Girl Cartier


Cheongdo Wine Tunnel

Cheongdo, in Gyeongsanbukdo is well known for its bull fighting, dalmaji burning and annual tug of war. It is a renowned garden city popular for its fresh farm produce such as peaches and persimmons. It is for the latter that most visitors venture from all over the peninsula to sample some of Cheongdo’s famous persimmons… in wine form at the Cheongdo wine tunnel.  


Drinking Culture in Korea

If you’ve ever been to Korea as an adult, either as a student or as a worker, you probably noticed right away how much Koreans drink. In fact, it’s been statistically proven that Koreans drink the most hard alcohol in the world – even more than Russians!

You might have also noticed how difficult it seems to escape from meetings involving drinking, even if you’re not into it yourself. Almost every time you meet a new person, or even an old friend, someone will likely suggest a round of drinks. The impression you get is that it’s an important part of Korean culture, and that especially soju is liked by many Koreans, but you’re probably wondering how the Korean drinking culture came to be this way. You might still be curious of all the rules that have to do with it, such as never leaving a glass empty. With this post we would like to explain to you why the drinking culture in Korea is the way it is.

 


Where Travelers Should Go in Seoul During Seollal 2017

Happy New Year! Can you believe 2016 is officially over? Neither can we!

2017 is the Year of the Rooster and Koreans celebrate the Lunar New Year, or ‘Seollal’ in Korean, which is one of the biggest holidays in Korea. This year, Seollal is from the 27th to 30th of January.


2017 Preview, part 1: East Asian Security




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This is a local re-up of a broad predictive overview of East Asian security issues in 2017 published first at the Lowy Institute a few days ago.


Tea for One

Eating lunch alone or having a quiet beer at home on the couch doesn’t strike most Westerners as out of the ordinary; but in South Korea, a country whose culture is more oriented toward group affiliation, something as simple as having a sandwich at your desk could mark you as anti-social or an object of pity: the dreaded wangtta, or social outcast, doomed to a life of solitary meals and other lonely pursuits.



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