Skip to Content

travel

Our 4th Chuseok in Korea, Part 1 – Seoul

Growing up, Thanksgiving was always my favorite holiday. There is no pressure about gifts, the family is way less stressed, and it is all about gratitude, family, and good food. My kind of holiday. The day really embodies Fall, with it’s smells and sweaters, colors, and football (or nap time for me).

In Korea, Chuseok is compared to Thanksgiving because it is also a harvest festival (minus the genocide and kum ba yah stories of sharing some turkey), but it is as big as Christmas is in the States. Being that it’s one of the two biggest holidays in Korea, we usually get 4 or 5 days off! Hooray!

We also got some pretty great Chuseok gifts this year, and if you’re interested in seeing what kind of quirky things we got check out the video!


Human Gutterballing

 

by Pablo Harris

 

“Damn, man, you’re still here?”

“Hey.”

“Don’t you have a bed? A house? I know you do. Why don’t you try and visit it sometime? I mean, shit man, you know you’re welcome here but sometimes, I just want to open the door, come home from work, walk into my place, and not have this lazy fuck sleeping, crop-dusting on my couch. So you just been laying around, dropping ass in here all day? Open a window or something, man.”

“Yeah, uh, sorry.”

“Do you even remember last night?”

“Most I think. Not everything.”

“So, what do you remember?”


The Weekend Warrior’s Guide to… Siem Reap

With the city’s innumerable temples, overeager moto drivers, unofficial tour guides, flocks of one-dollar kids, and absurd humidity, 48 hours in Siem Reap can be a rather beguiling experience for the unprepared. This weekend warrior’s guide will set you straight.


The Ryukyu Islands, Japan.


Protectors of an Ancient Time

 

Originally Published at TeyMarieAstudillo.com

Today, we have satellites, aircraft, bombs, guns – a whole slew of modern warfare technology that countries use to protect themselves from other nations.

But in ancient times, the only thing that separated people from a potential invasion or destruction by a foreign nation or their soldiers was a simple brick and mud wall.

These defense walls were the common protectors of cities and sovereign lands in ancient times. We can see the remanence of them all over the world – from The Great Wall of China to The Walls of Constantinople in Turkey.

Which brings me to the Seoul Fortress Wall.


Letter to Korea, August 2014

Dear Korea,


5 Amazing Bingsu Desserts in Korea

My favorite thing to eat in the blistering hot Korean summer is bingsu. I’m not a huge fan of hot weather, so this popular dessert of shaved ice milk and assorted toppings is a perfect way to cool off. Starting around May you’ll see new businesses that open just for the summer, and you can assume that most of them are bingsu places. This summer I’ve noticed that a specific chain called Sulbing 설빙, which originated in Busan, has spread throughout the country. I’ve seen Sulbing or a ripoff version of Sulbing even in small towns in the country! We realized when we filmed this video that the two videos we’ve done about this tasty treat have both featured mango bingsu, so we decided to ask some friends to send us some pictures of their favorite bingsu around the country so that we could share it!


Korean “Fire Hot” Chicken Feet (불닭발)

Of all the endless eating opportunities, I ended up wanting to try the chicken feet! They are served up in Korea a few different ways, but the kind I wanted were the hot ones.

The ones I tried are called 불닭발 (bul dak bal) or “Fire Chicken Feet”. Anytime I see the word 불 in front of a dish here I wonder if I can hack it or not. I mean, I handled the 불낙 볶음면 which is literally translated “super-crazy spicy hot ramyeon noodles to fry off your face”.  Yeah, it’s funny how these names pan out. Truth be told, they weren’t the hottest noodles I’ve ever had.

So I figured these chicken feet can’t be all that bad.

They were. I’m convinced they are marinated with jet fuel or something because after just one tiny piece I was sweating profusely.


4 Foods in Korea You Probably Won’t Like

Not everything you can eat in Korea is going to be delicious. Many foreigners come here and right off the boat the moment they eat anything, they say it’s “delicious”. It doesn’t even matter what it is. It may not even be Korean food!

Don’t get me wrong, there are many, many foods here that are completely and utterly addictive. There’s no questioning that.

HOWEVER, there will be some things here available to eat that you’d probably wish were not available.

Here’s my list of 4 of them. Happy dining!


The Lie

This is one of the most sincere things I have ever written about myself. I am at a point in my life where I feel comfortable about sharing it, and for my closest friends this will be the first time you hear it. It’s a  story I was afraid to tell, but I hope it can serve a purpose now. This is the last post I will be writing.

________________________________________________________________________

In life, there are times when the floor drops from beneath you.

Four years ago I asked if I could leave drawing class early to go to a doctor’s appointment. My instructor at the time asked me if everything was OK, to which I reassured, “Of course, I’m fine, it’s probably not a big deal.”

One hour later I was diagnosed with Takayasu’s Arteritis.


Syndicate content

Koreabridge
Facebook Group


Features @koreabridge
Blogs   @koreablogs
Job Ads  @koreabridgejobs
Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge Google+ Community