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Danger Mammal

I'm just making some last minute changes to the things I've packed ready for our climb tomorrow. Although I can't help but notice I'm going to be wearing exactly what I wore when we went to Seoroksan, I looked like a garden gnome playing football!

I'm about to head to meet Nick for dinner. It reminded me about last night when I was waiting for him at the train station and the fountain show started. This drunk old guy in a suit and trilby kept thrusting his hands towards the fountain as in going 'TA DAAAA' expecting the water or the lights to change and making it look as if he was magically gifted to change the lights. Unfortunately it didn't work for him, so he decided to climb onto the stage, but missed the stage and fell in a crumpled heap! The last thing I saw of him he was straddling a wall and having a cigarette! I'll miss the old, reckless drunks in Korea!

2013 KOTESOL International Conference

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Conversations at the 2013 KOTESOL International Conference



 


Sports Day 2013

The sports day at Namsung is far closer to an episode of Takeshi's Castle rather than the traditional egg and spoon race I'm used to in England.

All the old favourites from last year were played again, plus a few new ones. It started out with Natasha and I, plus maybe thirty of the mums wafting a long, thin piece of material while dads threw their first grade kids onto said material and were flung across the tempestuous waves the mothers were creating, while screaming as their loved ones were flicked around. I was sad that the put your child in a sack, mix them all around and then give the mums a minute to find their offspring event wasn't featured this year.

Most Used Teaching Websites for ESL

We will be posting our Monday video a little bit late today, so instead I’ve decided to share some teaching resources with you! If you have anything you think I should add, or if you have any questions about these resources, feel free to ask in the comments! :)

I teach Kindergarten and 3rd – 6th grade at a public elementary school. There are about 5 or 6 textbooks in circulation currently in Korea, and my school uses the books from YBM and YBM Si-sa.


Say What?! Episode 7: Koreans think I’m a criminal?

First of all I want to say thanks to all the new EPIK teachers on the Fall 2013 intake page for voting on the Say What?! video topics! I’m getting a lot more votes every week, and your input is invaluable. :)

The topic of this video is related to differences in ideas of personal space and service. When we are experiencing a new culture, it is best to identify and acknowledge these differences in order to save us from unwanted frustration. Not that these things NEVER frustrate me, they do, but calling it what it is, a cultural difference, and not a “fault” of the people or country, is EXTREMELY important.

Doing so will make the difference in your time spent in Korea, whether its for just one year or more. I know people that have been here for more than 5 years that still actively complain about their personal space being violated, and it seems to really put a damper on how they view Koreans as people and as a country. This notion makes me sad, because they’re letting such unimportant differences define not only Koreans, but their experience living here.

As I said, my personal space being violated IS frustrating to me, but I recognize that it is not a personal offense, I am living in a foreign culture, and sometimes that means being uncomfortable and accepting a different status quo. In other words, shake it off! See the best in people, you will be happier for it.

Any thoughts? I’d love to hear them in the comments!



The post Say What?! Episode 7: Koreans think I’m a criminal? appeared first on Evan and Rachel.


Finishing Up at CEV

CEV is an English Village, where students come to be taught in an immersion program. There are 8 teachers, from various countries and we teach different students every week as part of the ‘camp’. It is an English only environment where the students visit a variety of simulation rooms such as Post Office, Bank, Hospital, Shop, Airport, Hotel and Restaurant as well as practice conservation in English. There are also other fun rooms such as Science, Art, Language Laboratory and Movie Theatre. We teach primarily students from the age of 9-15 years old. On occasion we teach Kindergarten and twice a year we have a hagwon style class in the evenings where the same students return everyday.


Say What?! Episode 6: Maybe=Do it?

This week I posted a poll asking new EPIK teachers what topic they would like to see me cover in a Say What?! video. This topic would have been my last choice, just because it seemed to be the hardest to talk about. But I’m really glad the new teachers voted for this topic, because usually the hardest things to talk about are the most important! And this is a VERY important thing to understand in order to be happy here.


Korean and Guest English Teachers Working Together Webcast


ELT Live:  Korean and Guest English Teachers Working Together
September 5, 2013


 Participants
Xena Dayoung Kim's profile photo
Mar Hee Jeon's profile photo
Evan Rachel's profile photo
Samantha Xol's profile photo
Jeff Lebow's profile photo
DayoungMarHeeMinjeeMinjiRachelSamanthaJeff



Download Audio
 
 
Korean Public School teachers and  Guest English Teachers discuss cultural issues, teaching tips, and basic survival skills for surviving and thriving in school. 
 


Say What?! Episode 5: School Starts in March?

This episode of Say What?! Wednesday is about the school calendar in Korea. I’ve already posted the school calendar with all of the “red days” throughout the year, but in this video I discuss the big picture of the school year. It’s very different from the American school calendar, so it’s good to be aware of what time of year you will start working so you can plan accordingly. I’ve heard of quite a few teachers assuming that THEIR first day of classes is also the STUDENTS first day of classes, meaning they planned a lesson assuming the students didn’t know each other. But they may have already had an entire semester together! So keep all of this in mind to avoid having an awkward first class! It’s okay and encouraged to do a short introduction of yourself though. :)


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