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This is a Korean tape dispenser. It is genius. See, when you...



This is a Korean tape dispenser. It is genius. See, when you turn the knob on the right, the gears spin, turning the tape and delivering it in pieces cut by the plastic spokes.

Do you know how awesome this tool is when your ESL student has ripped their page for the umpteenth time?! Neat, fast, and safe. Teachers all over the world need this tape dispenser.


Italian Students Speak

As a full time teacher of English as a Second Language I come across many ways in which to encourage learners to activate their acquired language. During this summer (2013) I was teaching teenaged Italian students in Ireland, and I found that more so that my past experiences, my students were very active online. I thought of ways in which I could get them to use this interest in a lesson.


July

I know, we're nearly half way through August already so this post is a little late but the sun is shining and the beach is hard to resist after work at the moment! After the rainy season at the start of the month the weather really started heating up, meaning air con is on full blast and I'm going to have arms like Popeye by the time I've finished with my fan. It was also vacation time for my school, here's what else we got up to!

Korean Shoes
Having been back in Korea since March, it had become apparent that I'd been in the country for too long, so I shared 6 clear reasons.

The Koreans of Europe

No two cultures are the same but every one is similar, right? You could certainly say that about much of Europe, where thousands of years of breeding, trading, warring, traveling, and sharing across ever-shifting borders has caused a mixology of international characteristics of which one can be difficult to discern from the other.

In Asia, it is a little more difficult to separate the differences because the continent has suffered less fluctuation of its borders, and in terms of today’s map, colonialism for the most part decided on today’s borders. But still you can throw in the changes, regardless of actual influence, of international trade, development, colonialism, the sharing of ideas, television, and migration, and the wind at the weekend if you wish, and you will soon realise the stark similarities between peoples and cultures there.


Homeward Bound? Not Likely.

As I’m sitting here, I wonder if I’m really even capable of blogging about this without it turning into some chaotic rant on the state of public education.  Probably not, but I feel like I need to say something about what’s been going on in public education in my home state.

See, when you’re an expat, even a well-adjusted one like I consider myself, you always miss home.  You get excited about going home.  You think about your favorite things to eat, the people you love, and all the stuff you’re going to see and do when you get back to the world you know and love. 

Over the past couple of weeks, through a draconian near-dismemberment of public education, the state of North Carolina has made pretty sure I won’t be going home when our time here in Korea is up.  And it’s not just because of the money, although not being paid for the Masters degree that I earned is a pretty serious affront.


Let’s wrap this up?


Summer Holiday!

After 5 long months of working hard, it's finally our Summer Holidays!!

The whole English department celebrated on Monday night with some tasty sushi and soju at a restaurant in Haeundae, followed by some drinks in Jangsan. As I explained before about work nights out here in Korea, everybody had a great time eating lots of food and playing drinking games. I felt very bad for the teachers who had to be in school the next day.
End of term work night out

Job Themed Event Week

Last week was Namsung Elementary’s English Event Week. We hold Event Weeks with the purpose of teaching the kids a little more English with lots of emphasis on speaking, and having fun. Previous themes we've had are Under The Sea, Outer Space, Christmas in England and the environment.

This term the theme was jobs and we turned the English Department into a hospital, a TV studio, a catwalk, a court, a police station and finally a kitchen. The kids got the opportunity to spend their English classes in all of the different zones, trying out new activities, singing songs and speaking English.

My students don’t believe I live in Korea. They think I...



My students don’t believe I live in Korea. They think I fly to the US every night to sleep.


Evan’s Hagwon Tour

Hello again! It’s time for another video!

I (Evan) work at a rather large hagwon in our little city in South Korea. It’s a big, four story building with many large and small class rooms. There’s even a huge, nice apartment on top. The hagwon sits half way up Obongsan, so there are great views from the roof and the windows on the upper floors. It’s across from a public kindergarten, named 해바라기, where I also teach – but that’s a story for another post!

Hagwon in Korea


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