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Attack of the Cute: Korean Edition

Just when you thought you had seen all the adorable things on the Internet…. here is an entry into this year’s Dream Festival English competition from one of our sister campuses.


Korean Public School Office Tour

I found this old video from my phone and wanted to share it with you guys! It’s a tour of my old office from the first year at my school, during my school’s festival. I’m in a different, better office now which I will do a tour of in the future. But if you’re curious what your office may look like as a public school teacher in Korea, here’s a quick glimpse!



The post Korean Public School Office Tour appeared first on Evan and Rachel.


Summer Camp

This year's Summer Camp went really, really well. Last year I hated it so much that it made me want to leave Korea, but this year it seemed to go really smoothly. The kids were pretty eager to learn, the books and schedules well organised and we were all assigned one class who we had to direct in performing a play.

My play was called 'The Pumpkin Ghost on Halloween Night' and I worked with a group of 11 3rd and 4th grade kids. Some of the times they'd have me tearing out my hair, but I had to say when it came down to the performance in front of the rest of the school I was really impressed by them.

Some of the younger kids looked so cute doing their plays, and the 6th grade boys made the school laugh by taking the girls parts in a performance of Beauty and the Beast.

Now it's at an end I'll kind of miss seeing some of their faces everyday!

Makgeolli Making Class Success

We spent last Saturday up to our elbows in rice, water, and nuruk, all in the name of makgeolli brewing education.  The good people at Susubori Academy and expat Brewers Becca Baldwin & Dan Lenaghan walked us through the ins and outs of fermentation, and our Mamas & Papas relished every minute.


A Guide to Understanding Korean (School) Culture for Guest English Teachers

Editor’s Note from Jeff: This was written by a Korean elementary school teacher as an assignment for my Cross-Cultural Communication course. The task was to “prepare a guide for improving cross-cultural communication and interactions in your workplace”.  Since many Guest English Teachers will be starting school this week, I thought it was the right time to publish this. Hopefully, it will encourage a useful discussion about how Korean Teachers and Guest English Teachers can work together to create a positive learning/working environment.   Thanks very much to Jessi for agreeing to post this here.



This is a Korean tape dispenser. It is genius. See, when you...



This is a Korean tape dispenser. It is genius. See, when you turn the knob on the right, the gears spin, turning the tape and delivering it in pieces cut by the plastic spokes.

Do you know how awesome this tool is when your ESL student has ripped their page for the umpteenth time?! Neat, fast, and safe. Teachers all over the world need this tape dispenser.


Italian Students Speak

As a full time teacher of English as a Second Language I come across many ways in which to encourage learners to activate their acquired language. During this summer (2013) I was teaching teenaged Italian students in Ireland, and I found that more so that my past experiences, my students were very active online. I thought of ways in which I could get them to use this interest in a lesson.


July

I know, we're nearly half way through August already so this post is a little late but the sun is shining and the beach is hard to resist after work at the moment! After the rainy season at the start of the month the weather really started heating up, meaning air con is on full blast and I'm going to have arms like Popeye by the time I've finished with my fan. It was also vacation time for my school, here's what else we got up to!

Korean Shoes
Having been back in Korea since March, it had become apparent that I'd been in the country for too long, so I shared 6 clear reasons.

The Koreans of Europe

No two cultures are the same but every one is similar, right? You could certainly say that about much of Europe, where thousands of years of breeding, trading, warring, traveling, and sharing across ever-shifting borders has caused a mixology of international characteristics of which one can be difficult to discern from the other.

In Asia, it is a little more difficult to separate the differences because the continent has suffered less fluctuation of its borders, and in terms of today’s map, colonialism for the most part decided on today’s borders. But still you can throw in the changes, regardless of actual influence, of international trade, development, colonialism, the sharing of ideas, television, and migration, and the wind at the weekend if you wish, and you will soon realise the stark similarities between peoples and cultures there.


Homeward Bound? Not Likely.

As I’m sitting here, I wonder if I’m really even capable of blogging about this without it turning into some chaotic rant on the state of public education.  Probably not, but I feel like I need to say something about what’s been going on in public education in my home state.

See, when you’re an expat, even a well-adjusted one like I consider myself, you always miss home.  You get excited about going home.  You think about your favorite things to eat, the people you love, and all the stuff you’re going to see and do when you get back to the world you know and love. 

Over the past couple of weeks, through a draconian near-dismemberment of public education, the state of North Carolina has made pretty sure I won’t be going home when our time here in Korea is up.  And it’s not just because of the money, although not being paid for the Masters degree that I earned is a pretty serious affront.


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