success

RTBC Day Nine: Flying Solo

Reflective Teaching Blog Challenge – Day Nine: Write about one of your biggest accomplishments in your teaching that no one knows about (or may not care).

Part of being an English teacher in the EPIK program means working with a co-teacher in the classroom. However, this past week I was faced with the challenge/opportunity of teaching not one, but TWO classes all on my own! And get this: the students and I both survived, and maybe even thrived!

In the minutes before these classes, part of me was absolutely terrified to stand alone in front of a room full of students who barely understood a word I said. I dreaded the process of presenting vocabulary and explaining activities without my co-teacher being there to come to my rescue. And I almost had to sit down at the thought of how I would discipline the students if trouble came along.


Korean Education: High Grades, High Pressure… Low Happiness?

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What is the point of school? To get good grades? To make friends and have fun? To teach you about life and help you to become independent? Well I think that all three things are important. Unfortunately in Korea, I have seen far too much emphasis placed on the first thing: to get good grades. Of course, it’s well known that some of the best academic results in the world come from South Korea, and Western schools could certainly learn a lesson or two from the Koreans about how to gain such success. But what the Korean Education system surely lacks is balance, and the realisation that sometimes, less is more.


Daegu 2011 – An Armchair Interpretation of the Plight of Two Underachieving Nations in Track and Field

A few days before the IAAF World Athletics Championship in Daegu commenced, the president of Korea Lee Myung Bak proudly declared that the championships would inspire Koreans to develop their abilities in this area. But after only five days, Yonhap News declared that Korea is in danger of getting shut out after missing so many goals with their athletes being forced to watch from the sidelines as headline after headline was created by the international community. Did something go wrong, or should they have just not have been so excited? Perhaps they should have spoken to Ireland beforehand.

Ireland and Korea are not renowned for their prowess in track and field. Daegu 2011 is another good example of this. This isn’t an attempt to disparage the efforts of those who have put their heart and soul into competing in the event – my own efforts pale in comparison to theirs – but, as the title would suggest, an armchair analysis of the whole rigmarole.


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