Study Korean

Korean Winter Food You Must Try

Have you had a chance to try Korean winter foods?

The Korean winter gets very cold, so staying in indoors is the way to go! Thankfully, that leaves plenty of time for cooking.

In order to make the winter more comfortable, Koreans have many tasty snacks and dishes that they like to eat during these cold few months.

We’ll fill you in so you can give some of these a try!

Note: If you can’t read the Korean alphabet yet, you can download a free guide to learn in 60 minutes here.

 

Winter Snacks & Street Food


How to Say ‘Cute’ in Korean

Ever wondered how to say ‘cute’ in Korean? Unlike English, the Korean word for cute is used a lot! You can use it to describe something cute, such as a puppy or doll, or you can use the word to pay somebody a compliment.

In fact, many people in Korea want to be seen as ‘cute’, and will behave in ‘cute’ ways. This is known as 애교 (aegyo). People acting in this way will be pleased to hear you describe them as ‘cute’, so make sure you learn this word so that you can make lots of friends in Korea.

Note: If you want to say cute as in ‘handsome’, such as ‘check out that cute guy over there’, then you should use the word for handsome instead.


Christmas in Korea: What Is It Like?

Christmas in Korea is very different from Christmas in North America or Europe. There are some superficial similarities, such as Christmas decorations in shop windows, but look beyond that and the differences become very apparent.

The good news is that Christmas is a national holiday in Korea. That means that if you work in an office, school, or factory that isn’t owned by the local scrooge, then you are likely to have the day off.

Unlike many Asian countries, a large proportion of Koreans are Christian, which explains why the day is a national holiday. It also means that there are special Christmas services in churches around the country.

However, Christmas isn’t one of Korea’s big traditional holidays like Seollal or Chuseok, so there isn’t a mad rush of everybody trying to make it back to his or her hometown for Christmas.


How to Say ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean

Ready to celebrate Christmas in Korea?

Or maybe bring Korea to your Christmas?

You’ve come to the right place!

Christmas is a national holiday in Korea and you will see Christmas decorations and Christmas trees around Seoul during the festive period. Learning how to say ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean is pretty straightforward so be sure to wish all of your Korean friends a merry Christmas!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

Formal ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean

1. 행복한 크리스마스 되십시오 (haeng-bok-han keu-ri-seu-ma-seu dwi-ship-shi-o)

This is the formal way of saying ‘Merry Christmas’ since it has the –십시오 ending. You might see this on signs, posters, or cards. You can safely use it with all groups of people and nobody will get offended.

행복하다 = happy, blissful


How to Say ‘Happy New Year’ in Korean

Ready to try out your Korean skills while you bring in the new year? We’ll show you how!

Before we get into that, a few important things to go over related to New Year’s in Korea.

Firstly, Korea has two New Year celebrations. On January 1st, there is the celebration of the Solar New Year, 신정 (Sin-jeong). That is the celebration covered in this article.

However, in late January or early February, Koreans celebrate the Lunar New Year, 구정 (Gu-jeong), by having a large holiday known as 설날 (Seollal). During Seollal, people usually visit their hometown, eat 떡국 (Ddeok-gook) with their families, and visit their ancestors’ graves.

During the Solar New Year, people often spent time with their friends. In Central Seoul on New Year’s Eve, many people gather to hear the ringing of the bell in Jongno on the stroke of midnight.


How to Say ‘Good Morning’ in Korean

It’s always good to start off the day on a positive note.

One easy way to do that is with a nice, polite, friendly “good morning”.

But how can we say “good morning” in Korean?

In most situations, you can just use ‘hello‘ instead of saying ‘good morning’ when speaking Korean. However, if you want to specifically say ‘good morning’ instead of ‘hello’, then you’ll want to know these phrases.

Onward we go!

 


How to Say ‘You’re Welcome’ in Korean

Previously, we learned how to say ‘thank you’ in Korean. After somebody says thank you, it’s good manners to reply with a ‘you’re welcome’.

Let’s learn how to say ‘you’re welcome’ in Korean!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

Formal ‘You’re Welcome’ in Korean

1. 천만에요 (cheon-man-eh-yo)

This word comes from the number 천만 meaning ‘ten-million’ in English. The logic behind this expression is that the thing you are being thanked for doing is so small that even if you did it ten-million times the other person still wouldn’t need to thank you.


How to Say ‘I’m Hungry’ in Korean

Is your stomach grumbling? Did you skip lunch?

Then you’re going to need to know how to say ‘I’m hungry’ in Korean!

Let’s jump right into it.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘Hungry’ vs. ‘Full’ in Korean

When talking about whether you are hungry or not, two different adjectives are used.

In front of each adjective is the word 배 (bae), which means ‘stomach’. To say that you are hungry, you add the adjective 고프다 (go-puh-da) to make 배 고프다.

Strictly speaking, the particle ‘가’ (ga) should come after ‘배’ to make ‘배가 고프다’. However, when speaking, people drop this particle.


How to Say ‘I Miss You’ in Korean

It’s time to speak from the heart!

Today, we’re going to explain how to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

Two Korean Verbs for ‘Miss’

If you are wondering how to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean and you look in the dictionary, then you will likely come across the verb 그립다 (keu-rip-da).

Although this word does mean ‘to miss’, it isn’t used that often in spoken Korean. Instead of 그립다, the expression 보고 싶다 (bo-go ship-da) is used when people want to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean.

보고 싶다 literally means ‘I want to see’. It is made up of the verb 보다 (to see) and the suffix -고 싶다 which expresses the idea of wanting to do a particular action.


Top 10 Korean Jokes

Ready for some laughs?

Here’s a list of some of the top Korean jokes. Most of them are a mix of Korean and English, so it helps if you know at least some basic Korean.

We’ve also tossed in some pictures to help you remember these Korean jokes more easily.

If you can’t read Hangul (the Korean Alphabet) yet, you can download a free guide here and be reading in about 60 minutes.

Let the games begin!

Caution: Don’t drink milk while reading these jokes. There’s a high chance that milk will shoot out from your nose from laughter!

Korean Joke #1Korean joke beans

Q: What is the biggest bean in the world?


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