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How to Say ‘I’m Hungry’ in Korean

Is your stomach grumbling? Did you skip lunch?

Then you’re going to need to know how to say ‘I’m hungry’ in Korean!

Let’s jump right into it.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


‘Hungry’ vs. ‘Full’ in Korean

When talking about whether you are hungry or not, two different adjectives are used.

In front of each adjective is the word 배 (bae), which means ‘stomach’. To say that you are hungry, you add the adjective 고프다 (go-puh-da) to make 배 고프다.

Strictly speaking, the particle ‘가’ (ga) should come after ‘배’ to make ‘배가 고프다’. However, when speaking, people drop this particle.

How to Say ‘I Miss You’ in Korean

It’s time to speak from the heart!

Today, we’re going to explain how to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


Two Korean Verbs for ‘Miss’

If you are wondering how to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean and you look in the dictionary, then you will likely come across the verb 그립다 (keu-rip-da).

Although this word does mean ‘to miss’, it isn’t used that often in spoken Korean. Instead of 그립다, the expression 보고 싶다 (bo-go ship-da) is used when people want to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean.

보고 싶다 literally means ‘I want to see’. It is made up of the verb 보다 (to see) and the suffix -고 싶다 which expresses the idea of wanting to do a particular action.

How to Say ‘I Don’t Know’ in Korean

We all like to know the answer to questions. It makes us feel helpful, knowledgeable, and in control.

However, there will always be times when we don’t know the answer to something. In those cases, it’s best to tell the truth and say, “I don’t know”. The other person will respect your honesty!

Today, we will explain how to say, “I don’t know” in Korean.

On your marks, get set, go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


Root Verb for ‘I Don’t Know’

There are two verbs we’re going to compare today. They are opposites: One is quite knowledgeable, and one is a bit ignorant.

Ready to meet them?

Book review: Wild Korean (야생 한국어) – Sanghyun Ahn

Stop being stuck at the basic level.

Calling itself “A Fieldguide to Real Korean Conversation”, Wild Korean promises to get you conversational by the time you’re finished with the textbook. While my own book, Korean Made Easy, teaches you enough to get started and make your way around, I was delighted to hear about Wild Korean. Kudos to Ahn Sang-hyun for writing it and Jo-Anna Lynch over at The View From Over Here for her role as editor.

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