learn korean language

How to Say ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean

Ready to celebrate Christmas in Korea?

Or maybe bring Korea to your Christmas?

You’ve come to the right place!

Christmas is a national holiday in Korea and you will see Christmas decorations and Christmas trees around Seoul during the festive period. Learning how to say ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean is pretty straightforward so be sure to wish all of your Korean friends a merry Christmas!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


Formal ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean

1. 행복한 크리스마스 되십시오 (haeng-bok-han keu-ri-seu-ma-seu dwi-ship-shi-o)

This is the formal way of saying ‘Merry Christmas’ since it has the –십시오 ending. You might see this on signs, posters, or cards. You can safely use it with all groups of people and nobody will get offended.

행복하다 = happy, blissful

How to Say ‘Happy New Year’ in Korean

Ready to try out your Korean skills while you bring in the new year? We’ll show you how!

Before we get into that, a few important things to go over related to New Year’s in Korea.

Firstly, Korea has two New Year celebrations. On January 1st, there is the celebration of the Solar New Year, 신정 (Sin-jeong). That is the celebration covered in this article.

However, in late January or early February, Koreans celebrate the Lunar New Year, 구정 (Gu-jeong), by having a large holiday known as 설날 (Seollal). During Seollal, people usually visit their hometown, eat 떡국 (Ddeok-gook) with their families, and visit their ancestors’ graves.

During the Solar New Year, people often spent time with their friends. In Central Seoul on New Year’s Eve, many people gather to hear the ringing of the bell in Jongno on the stroke of midnight.

Learn Korean in 2016: 90 Day Korean Roundup

2015 was another fantastic year in the world of Korean learning and we can’t thank our readers enough for all the support, comments and wonderful feedback! 

In the past year, we’ve seen our lessons and teachings reach more and more students in many new countries and we’ve had new members join our Inner Circle from Israel, Switzerland, Singapore, Indonesia and many other countries! Our students and readers are amazing and we appreciate every single one of you.

Our paid Korean course launched a third 90-day module this year, and the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive as we’ve had a cohort of students go through the entire course and learn Korean to an intermediate level. We look forward to building onto our course in the next year and giving our learners more and more learning materials.

Korean Drama Phrases for Learning Korean

One fun and interesting way to study Korean is by watching Korean dramas.

Certain phrases appear in dramas more often than in other formats. Also, certain slang words become popularized by their use in a drama and have since become a more common part of everyday Korean lexicon.

For example the word 미생 (incomplete-life) was originally a term used in the Korean game 바둑 (Go!). Now it has become a popular word to describe the Korean office environment due to the drama (and manhwa) of the same name.

This article looks at some of the more common Korean drama phrases, and how to use them outside of dramas.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


How to Say ‘I’m Hungry’ in Korean

Is your stomach grumbling? Did you skip lunch?

Then you’re going to need to know how to say ‘I’m hungry’ in Korean!

Let’s jump right into it.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


‘Hungry’ vs. ‘Full’ in Korean

When talking about whether you are hungry or not, two different adjectives are used.

In front of each adjective is the word 배 (bae), which means ‘stomach’. To say that you are hungry, you add the adjective 고프다 (go-puh-da) to make 배 고프다.

Strictly speaking, the particle ‘가’ (ga) should come after ‘배’ to make ‘배가 고프다’. However, when speaking, people drop this particle.

How to Say ‘I Miss You’ in Korean

It’s time to speak from the heart!

Today, we’re going to explain how to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


Two Korean Verbs for ‘Miss’

If you are wondering how to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean and you look in the dictionary, then you will likely come across the verb 그립다 (keu-rip-da).

Although this word does mean ‘to miss’, it isn’t used that often in spoken Korean. Instead of 그립다, the expression 보고 싶다 (bo-go ship-da) is used when people want to say ‘I miss you’ in Korean.

보고 싶다 literally means ‘I want to see’. It is made up of the verb 보다 (to see) and the suffix -고 싶다 which expresses the idea of wanting to do a particular action.

How to Say ‘I Don’t Know’ in Korean

We all like to know the answer to questions. It makes us feel helpful, knowledgeable, and in control.

However, there will always be times when we don’t know the answer to something. In those cases, it’s best to tell the truth and say, “I don’t know”. The other person will respect your honesty!

Today, we will explain how to say, “I don’t know” in Korean.

On your marks, get set, go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


Root Verb for ‘I Don’t Know’

There are two verbs we’re going to compare today. They are opposites: One is quite knowledgeable, and one is a bit ignorant.

Ready to meet them?

Book review: Wild Korean (야생 한국어) – Sanghyun Ahn

Stop being stuck at the basic level.

Calling itself “A Fieldguide to Real Korean Conversation”, Wild Korean promises to get you conversational by the time you’re finished with the textbook. While my own book, Korean Made Easy, teaches you enough to get started and make your way around, I was delighted to hear about Wild Korean. Kudos to Ahn Sang-hyun for writing it and Jo-Anna Lynch over at The View From Over Here for her role as editor.

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