Korean food

Korea Attractions: Jagalchi Fish Market Walking Tour

Busan is like a former NBA basketball player named Scott Pippen. Do you know who he is? If your a basketball fan from the 1990s then you will know who I’m referring to, otherwise you probably have no idea.

That’s because Pippen was the SECOND best player on a team called the Chicago Bulls. His famous teammate was Michael Jordan. Yes, everybody knows who he is! But, Scott Pippen…not so much. He was actually known as “Scottie Pippen” but I was just trying to make a point.

That’s Busan and Seoul in a nutshell. Everybody knows Seoul because it’s the capital, has the largest population, and is good for those looking for a concrete jungle.

Busan on the other hand, is better for those looking for more variety in landscape and activities. Busan has mountains on one side, beaches on the other. It’s a mix of big city feel and small town vibe. Busan is juxtaposed with the old and new country more vividly than Seoul.


Miyeok Guk | Birthday Soup

It’s Danny’s birthday! What should I cook? I only had one thing in mind: miyeok guk.

미역국 (miyeok guk) is also known as the birthday soup in Korea. It’s made of seaweed and sometimes mixed with chunks of beef or mussels. This soup is nutritiously packed with iodine and calcium. Pregnant mothers usually consume this healthy soup after giving birth to increase breastmilk production. That’s also the reason why birthday celebrants are given this soup as a reminder of their first food from their mothers. But of course, one can have this delicious, hot bowl of miyeok guk anytime, anywhere.

Ingredients: (4 persons)


Top 5 Vegan (and Vegan-Friendly) Restaurants in Seoul

I often get many e-mails requesting recommendations for vegan eats in Korea. While I appreciate vegan food, and have had some fantastic dining experiences at vegan restaurants in the city, I'm most certainly no expert. So, I enlisted the help of someone who is. Amanda from SoKoreazy.com has graciously offered to share her top five vegan (and vegan-friendly) restaurants in Seoul. Without further ado, here they are:

1. Cafe Suッkara (Sukkara) (vegan-friendly) 

My favorite vegan restaurant in Seoul is not actually a vegan restaurant, though vegan-friendly dishes and drinks feature heavily on their menu. Cafe Sukkara is nestled in a quiet, cozy, and rather nondescript building (noticeable only because of its huge, green wooden door) located between Hongdae and Sinchon. Cafe Sukkara has the perfect cafe atmosphere: dim lighting, low, comfy seats, and a completely open kitchen surrounded by bar stools. In the summertime, they slide the glass doors at the front of the cafe open, and you can enjoy your meal outside on their deck.

The cafe prides itself on using local, mostly organic, ingredients, and the menu changes seasonally. There are usually at least two vegan main dishes on offer, in addition to their always present vegan yeast bread, soup, and salad set. They also offer many vegan desserts, such as carrot cake and raw vegan cheesecake, as well as amazing drinks! I love their seasonal mojitos, made with homemade candied fruit, and their homemade ginger ale is the best I've had anywhere, with the perfect balance of sweetness and spiciness.




The Best Korean Street Food in Korea

Korea is well-known for too many things to count – music, television, and a rich, interesting history are only a few of the things that make Korean culture so unlike any other.

Another aspect of Korean culture that is unique and hard to beat is the incredible street food sprinkled throughout the country’s cities.

Whether you’re looking for a quick, salty snack or an adventure for your taste buds, read on to find out about some of the best Korean street food!

Sundae – 순대

Korean street food sundae

Image source: http://theseoulguide.com


Rubber Ducky, you're the one!


photo courtesy of Ondong Kim

lol… 



lol… 


Chef Bob Burger

 

Chef Bob Burger is a tasty place to eat in Cheonan and you should go there.

It’s located near the Starbucks, but unfortunately I can’t give you exact directions because I don’t really know how to do that in South Korea yet.

They serve “burgers” with rice “buns” instead of bread buns. The meat of the burger is a mystery to me, but so far I’d be willing to bet the meat I’ve eaten inside them is from a cow and occasionally a tuna fish that ran into a lot of mayo.

You can order for here or to go, and it’s really cheap. Anywhere from 2,000 3,500 won for a burger. You can also order a side of ddeokbokki, which is a mixture of really squishy rice and fish cake in a hot sauce. Ddeokbokki is good in small amounts and bad in large amounts. Chef Burger Bob has nice ddeokbokki.

 


Missing comforts of home in Korea

 

Here's another one I've already read about in a ton of blogs: around the 3 month mark of your time in Korea you'll really start missing the comforts of home.  It's my own fault.  I should have sent myself a care package.  I should have learned more Korean.  I should have brought a friend or boyfriend with me.  I should suck it up and deal with it.  This one gets a little sappy - be forewarned that I'm not actually upset just went down a rabbit hole of memories.  I'm missing the comforts of home.


9 Examples of South Korean School Lunches

Lunchtime is an interesting one for me. It probably is for most foreigners if they choose the route of breaking bread in the cafeterias with their Korean co-workers. If I don’t sit with my co-teacher, it’s pretty much just me in my own world chomping away.

There are occasions when some teachers will try to formulate a sentence or two, but not often. Even then, at both schools I’ve worked at teachers all sit in the same spot each day so if noone around me speaks English it’s going to be a quiet year.

Nonetheless, I go to the cafeteria to eat. And school lunches in Korea have been a delightful surprise for me. Why surprise? Because compared to the concoctions they call school lunch back home in America, these lunches are DELIGHTFUL.

The difference can be summed up in this way: natural vs. synthetic.


How do you Sunday Funday?




I've been staying in on Saturday nights to take full advantage of Sunday mornings and it's been paying off.  The past couple of Sundays have been pretty spectacular.  Great friends, great food, lots of walking - just a grand ol' time before heading back to work on Monday (let's be candid - my job is great and I don't start work until 12 PM Noon so every weekend feels a little longer than back home!).

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