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Zenith Tower Almost

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Few buildings in Korea sparks so many photographers to descend upon a rooftop like the Zenith Towers in Busan. These are one of the tallest apartment buildings in Korea and are located next to the ocean overlooking haeundae and the Gwangali Bridge. Suffice to say that the roof has a pretty impressive view.

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Koreabridge Typhoon Center


Storming the Bridge: Busan Hosts Korea’s Greatest Race

Each year, for one day in April, pedestrians and cyclists invade Busan’s most iconic landmark for a n

.Gwangan Bridge Race Signs d Storming the Bridge: Busan Hosts Koreas Greatest Race
The Busan miRun is easily one of my favorite events of the year. And it has quickly become the city’s most popular outdoor event besides the fireworks festival.


FLASK Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream in Busan

What is it?

South Korea is a country where you can very easily notice and identify trends–trends in fashion, hairstyles, and yes, FOOD! Every summer there seems to be a new ice cream trend. This year, one of those trends is liquid nitrogen ice cream! Different chains with the same concept are opening up all over Seoul and Busan, and we finally made our way to Nampo-dong in Busan to check out Flask. It looks like a laboratory and the “scientists” even wear white lab coats while they make your ice cream!


Obong English Festival 2014

One of the events I dread the most at my public school is the English speech competition. Kids reading memorized speeches most of them didn’t even write, about boring topics, with robotic hand gestures? No thank you. I’ve always hated judging those, because it just feels so disingenuous and unproductive. But this year, the administration at my school had the good sense to change things up! Instead of an English speech competition, they decided to host an English Festival! Sounds fun, right?


Holding On

I spoke to my parents the other day. My father was criticizing the way my mother cleaned a window, and in the middle of the video call went over to clean it better. I shook my head and commiserated with my mom.

“He’s suddenly so good at cleaning, huh? I wonder if he’ll use his talents on the basement.”

The only place in our house that none of us have any reign over is my father’s basement. He has his lab down there (dental technician), and with the rest of the space are things that he simply refuses to get rid of. Relics of the 90s, video tapes, elliptical machines, rugs and chairs. Convex TV screens and the smell of cardboard. The space is large enough to be a livingroom, and there was a long time when I wanted a spot down there to use as a studio space, but he filled every last crevasse with an empty promise that he would clean it. One day. Someday.


Introducing Expat Extractors, LLC

by Fred Colton

Hey you, over there. Yeah, you—with the hoodie and pit stained T-shirt, hunched over that convenience store ATM seeing if you’ve got enough in the account for a one-way flight back to the motherland.

I’ve seen your type before. You’re one of those infamous night fliers, stealing softly away from Korea as if from a one night stand before sun-up, never to call or Kakao again. And you’re in good company, fellow expat. It turns out that all manner of folks are trying to get off the Korean peninsula, and not just the northern half.

So who are you, sir?

-Maybe you’re an ESL teacher, a hagwon hustler, who’s found the job to be a brutal, futile one, like dumping water into a bucket with holes in it?


Jirisan National Park

“The mountain of the odd and wise people”


Busan's Hidden Gem

With a spread of vividly colorful houses sitting atop a seaside cliff, Taegeukdo Village in Busan (aka Gamcheon Culture Village) looks more like the scenery you’d expect to find in South America or along the shores of coastal Italy even, not South Korea.

This stark contrast to the ultra sleek buildings found in Gangnam, the pale high rise industrial-esque residential apartment towers that swallow most of Seoul and even the traditional Korean Hanok homes, has made the area a popular sightseeing destination for locals and foreigners over the years.

The village, originally formed in 1918 as a community for followers of the Taegeukdo religion, and later refugees during the Korean War, derives it’s name from the ‘taegeuk’ – more commonly known to westerners as the yin and yang symbols, which represent the balance of the universe.


10 Things In Korea That I’ll Never, Ever Do

by Mr. Motgol

I wrote this  piece a few years back, and while a few things have changed since then, most have not. As it is currently boshingtang eating season, not to mention Mudfest time, I thought that a re-post may be apropos. I’ve made a few small revisions. Enjoy. And don’t take it too seriously.

I like living in Korea. I’ve been here for almost ten years now, so if I hated it, I would have split a long time ago. I like hiking, I like the food, I like riding my motorcycle, checking out the street markets, and drinking my ass off. It’s a crowded crazy little place and I’ve grown to love it, for better or for worse. Plus, the girls are bangin’ hot. I should know: I married one.


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