foreigners

Dear Korea #139: It's Not the Size That Counts

 

The situation in the comic actually happened when I went to visit Seoul sometime last year. The only difference was that the last few panels totally didn’t happen, because I’m a coward who’s too scared to yell at people I know. Instead, I prefer to wait some time and then draw passive aggressive comics. Go me.


Dear Korea #138: Universal Coverage

Dear Korea #138

While I know the experience isn’t the same for everyone, one of the biggest factors keeping in South Korea is how affordable healthcare is compared to home. From what I’ve learned, the pricing isn’t that great compared to countries that have universal healthcare, but not going into debt after a regular visit to the doctor is pretty sweet. Even during the few years I lived here without health insurance, it was surprising to not use up entire paychecks to receive basic treatmen


Dear Korea #134: They're Catching On

I  just realized I made two strips related to language barriers in a row. Oops. Oh well, it’s too late to do anything about it now.


Dear Korea #133: I Don't Know You

Though how long it takes ranges from person to person, it seems as if the issue presented in this comic is one that affects very obvious looking expats at one point or another. As someone who doesn’t look too different from the locals, I’ve been lucky enough to not have experienced this myself, though I see it happening to my friends on a regular basis. While I can’t speak for anyone else, from what I’ve gathered, most of the people I know generally don’t mind having a conversation with strangers who want to practice some of the English they’ve learned. Heck, considering how most of them are teachers, this is kind of a good thing. That being said, there is a time and a place, and a forced dialogue in the middle of dinner or a date is apparently not ideal.


3 Female Teachers Talk About Dating, Racism, and Safety in Korea

One thing I’ve learned through blogging and vlogging over the past two years is that there are a lot of questions about life as an expat teaching English in Korea.

They are all different and they comes from all ages, races, and backgrounds. Among the questions about food, qualifications, documentation, and who Korean girls like most are those from female teachers inquiring about dating, racism, and safety.

Dating:
This is a danger zone topic I learned the hard way through my HIGHLY controversial vlog, DO NOT Teach English in Korea if You Are These Types of People.


Dear Korea #095 - Seriously. Stop It

 

Hey readers! In case you don’t follow me on Facebook for one reason or another, I was away on vacation for the past couple of weeks. This is why the updates have been rather…lacking. Now that vacation time is over, it’s time to get back to work. Boo.

During my vacation, a couple of friends of mine that I used to work with back when I was living stateside decided to take a family trip to Seoul. Since I tend to get unreasonably happy and excited whenever someone from home visits, I sent them essay long tips on traveling in Korea and went up to the big city for a few days to spend time with them while showing them around (even though this resulted in us getting lost multiple times).


Dear Korea #090 - Sorry for the Wardrobe Malfunction

 

Argh, how embarrassing. Not only did I miss last week’s update (here’s a silly, sad comic to make up for it), but this week’s is also late. If it helps, I’ve been suffering all morning with a wicked case of food poisoning that was brought on by delivery fried chicken from last night. The betrayal hurts so much worse than the tummy ache.


Dear Korea #084 - Addicted to the Melty Stuff

Dear Korea #084

Ack, this comic’s a week late. How embarrassing  If it’s any consolation, I bring you this comic combined with news that Dear Korea will be going back to its old weekly schedule! Yay for regularity! Here’s hoping I don’t run out of ideas too soon.


Threats and Warning for Foreigners in South Korea

By Christine Kim and Joyce Lee
 
 
SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea warned foreigners in South Korea on Tuesday to quit the

That Is Mannerless Speaking

While standing in line at the new Starbucks in town—why did I even go there? the green tea latte was $6!—and listening to Hanggai in my earbuds, I heard a woman behind me shouting, in Korean, “It’s a foreigner! It’s a foreigner!” I turned around and looked at this woman, who was shouting for the benefit of her toddler, then standing far beneath us. Rolling my eyes, I turned back to the front of the line, but the shouts of “It’s a foreigner!” continued unabated, and I thought, yes, this is it, finally, the moment I strike back, after almost four years of listening to people talk about me as if I can’t understand them, the end is here, this is the turn of the tide.

The earbuds come out.


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