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Nothing better than eating jokbal (족발) and drinking cold beer on...







Nothing better than eating jokbal (족발) and drinking cold beer on a hot day.

Wikipedia has a very accurate description of it: “The hair is removed from pigs’ feet and they are thoroughly washed. Leeks, garlic, ginger, rice wine, and water are brought to a boil. The pigs’ feet are added, brought back to a boil and then simmered until tender. Then additional water, sugar and soy sauce are poured into the pot and the contents are slowly stirred. Once the jokbal is fully cooked, bones are removed, and the meat is cut into thick slices. It is then served with fermented shrimp sauce called saeujeot (새우젓)."


Say What?! Episode 3: Hot Soup in Summer?

This week’s Say What?! Wednesday is about how weather and food are related in Korea. Koreans are very proud that they have 4 distinct seasons, but there are a few other “mini-seasons” in Korea that are worth noting! I mention several korean words in the video, and I’ll try to explain them clearly here.

In this video I talk about 복날 (Boknal), a month long weather pattern indicating the hottest part of the summer. There are 3 special days during 복날 (Boknal), the first is 초복 (Cho-bok), then 중복(Joong-bok), and 말복 (Mal-bok). As I mentioned in the video, this past Saturday (7/13) was 초복 Cho-bok!


Korea has four distinct seasons. In summer, it is hot and humid....



Korea has four distinct seasons. In summer, it is hot and humid. It is a Korean custom to choose the three hottest days of the summer and to eat especially healthy food on those days.

Boknal (복날) is known as the Three Dog Days of Summer. The first day is known as Chobok (초복), the second day is Jungbok (중복), and the third day is known as Malbok (말복). These days are predetermined by the lunar calendar. This year, the first day was on July 13, 2013.


Our Weekend: Cat Sitting and Comic Conventions

It's the first day of our job themed Event Week at school. It's so hot and sticky outside that dancing the 'Hot Potato' song is so tiring! I'm happy that we had a quiet weekend to save up all of my energy!

Dear Korea #092 - Some Things are Better Left Alone

Oh jeez, I hope you guys don’t hate me yet. I do apologize for being a couple of days late with this strip. You know how us old people get. I’m already starting to lose track of time.


Makin’ PatBingsu at Stumpy Ruffers


Do Koreans Go on Diets?

I received a great question from someone on YouTube about Koreans and whether or not they diet.  What is Korean food like?  What's happening here in this rapidly changing nation?

South Korea has experienced incredible economic growth in its recent history.  It wasn't too long ago that South Korea was considered one of the Four Asian Tigers (Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea).  That is, nations that showed incredible economic growth throughout the mid to late 1990s.  These countries, once well behind the world economically, rose from their dreary situation to become powerhouses on the global economic front.

Whew, that was a heavy intro...!

Well, most Americans can attest to what happens when a nation obtains economic strength and status.  We get fat and lazy!!  Ok, maybe not quite that bad, but it's safe to say there is evidence that some smidgen of truth is in that last statement.  So it will go for the Asian Tigers.

Out for a delicious 삼겹살 (samgyeopsal) dinner. It’s pork,...



Out for a delicious 삼겹살 (samgyeopsal) dinner. It’s pork, cut thinly (but thicker than bacon). I never used to like it very much, but I’ve developed a whole new appreciation for it recently.


The Privilege of Having Korean In-Laws

Having fairly conservative-minded Korean in-laws can be extremely frustrating, but I do sometimes forget the tremendous privilege it is to have a Korean side to my family.  It is an cultural experience every time I go and see them and gives me a great insight into a very traditional and rural Korean psyche.  On top of this, they really are genuine people and very kind to me.  I often feel very guilty about the amount of complaining I do.  Our differences cause a fair amount of problems, but their cause is nobody's fault, we just have ingrained cultural issues with one another that are not easily fixed.


Rice Burger (밥버거)

I have recently discovered a cheap delicious treat called Rice Burger (밥버거). It’s shaped like a burger, but uses rice as its bun, and it is eaten with a spoon. There are three simple instructions.

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1. Decide what you want. Prices range from 1,500 won ($1.33 USD) to 3,000 won ($2.65 USD). I like the kimchi bulgogi or darc-galbi. I think the mayo or cheese selections are kind of gross.

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It’s pretty cute when it arrives, but don’t eat it just yet.

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2. Unwrap a bit and… smash burger.


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