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Eating Korean “Hangover” Soup While Sober (Haejang Guk 해장국)

Soup 300x215 Eating Korean Hangover Soup While Sober (Haejang Guk 해장국) Haejang Guk (해장국) is a popular soup in Korea. Generally, it’s made with pork or beef, and ox blood. The last part probably sounds a little, like, “whuh??”, but trust me the soup is good.

It has a very hearty flavor to it. Much like the way good tomato soup is on a cold winter day. With grilled cheese sandwiches, of course.


20 Weird and Wonderful Korean Snacks

When we left home to move to Korea, there was one huge worry on my mind- we were leaving behind England, and with it all the comfort of delicious British food. No more roast dinners, no afternoon teas, no proper English puddings. And to our horror when we arrived, no proper chocolate (apart from the dreaded Hershey’s which, in my opinion, is a poor excuse for chocolate and tastes like it’s a year past its sell-by-date).

So, we were leaving yummy old England to live somewhere which the only foods we knew people ate were rice, one of the most boring foods known to man, and ‘Kimchi’- something which we had never heard of and had only seen described as ‘fermented cabbage’… um, yum?


Korean Convenience Store Food! GS25 Spaghetti & Meatballs

Some Korean interpretations on international foods are perfectly fine, especially in recent years. The number of burger joints is increasing, and with it, the quality. In this part of the peninsula (in Gimhae, a short lightrail journey back in Busan, the second largest city in South Korea), I can be sitting in front of a hot, delicious plate of fish & chips in about an hour.


Our 4th Chuseok in Korea, Part 1 – Seoul

Growing up, Thanksgiving was always my favorite holiday. There is no pressure about gifts, the family is way less stressed, and it is all about gratitude, family, and good food. My kind of holiday. The day really embodies Fall, with it’s smells and sweaters, colors, and football (or nap time for me).

In Korea, Chuseok is compared to Thanksgiving because it is also a harvest festival (minus the genocide and kum ba yah stories of sharing some turkey), but it is as big as Christmas is in the States. Being that it’s one of the two biggest holidays in Korea, we usually get 4 or 5 days off! Hooray!

We also got some pretty great Chuseok gifts this year, and if you’re interested in seeing what kind of quirky things we got check out the video!


Eating 해장국, ‘Hangover Soup,’ While Sober

Tom Gates of The Red Dragon Diaries and I are joined in our second food video collaboration (check out the first one, LIVE OCTOPUS, here) by our good friend, the lovely and talented Jookyeong, for a lovely meal of Haejang Guk, also known as “Hangover Soup.” It’s definitely not just for eating after a night of hard drinking!


5 Amazing Bingsu Desserts in Korea

My favorite thing to eat in the blistering hot Korean summer is bingsu. I’m not a huge fan of hot weather, so this popular dessert of shaved ice milk and assorted toppings is a perfect way to cool off. Starting around May you’ll see new businesses that open just for the summer, and you can assume that most of them are bingsu places. This summer I’ve noticed that a specific chain called Sulbing 설빙, which originated in Busan, has spread throughout the country. I’ve seen Sulbing or a ripoff version of Sulbing even in small towns in the country! We realized when we filmed this video that the two videos we’ve done about this tasty treat have both featured mango bingsu, so we decided to ask some friends to send us some pictures of their favorite bingsu around the country so that we could share it!


Korean “Fire Hot” Chicken Feet (불닭발)

Of all the endless eating opportunities, I ended up wanting to try the chicken feet! They are served up in Korea a few different ways, but the kind I wanted were the hot ones.

The ones I tried are called 불닭발 (bul dak bal) or “Fire Chicken Feet”. Anytime I see the word 불 in front of a dish here I wonder if I can hack it or not. I mean, I handled the 불낙 볶음면 which is literally translated “super-crazy spicy hot ramyeon noodles to fry off your face”.  Yeah, it’s funny how these names pan out. Truth be told, they weren’t the hottest noodles I’ve ever had.

So I figured these chicken feet can’t be all that bad.

They were. I’m convinced they are marinated with jet fuel or something because after just one tiny piece I was sweating profusely.


4 Years in Korea – How Korea Has Changed 2010-2014

I can’t believe I’m saying this, but July 13th marked 4 years in Korea for us! We’re a little bit late on celebrating this, but with our Youtube milestones and summer vacation, we didn’t want to overwhelm you guys with too much of the same thing (that thing being awesomeness hehe)!


4 Foods in Korea You Probably Won’t Like

Not everything you can eat in Korea is going to be delicious. Many foreigners come here and right off the boat the moment they eat anything, they say it’s “delicious”. It doesn’t even matter what it is. It may not even be Korean food!

Don’t get me wrong, there are many, many foods here that are completely and utterly addictive. There’s no questioning that.

HOWEVER, there will be some things here available to eat that you’d probably wish were not available.

Here’s my list of 4 of them. Happy dining!


FLASK Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream in Busan

What is it?

South Korea is a country where you can very easily notice and identify trends–trends in fashion, hairstyles, and yes, FOOD! Every summer there seems to be a new ice cream trend. This year, one of those trends is liquid nitrogen ice cream! Different chains with the same concept are opening up all over Seoul and Busan, and we finally made our way to Nampo-dong in Busan to check out Flask. It looks like a laboratory and the “scientists” even wear white lab coats while they make your ice cream!


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