english

Korea Blog Podcast: Korea’s English Fever, Or English Cancer?

Do all South Korean students need English in order to be a success? And why are students learning to score well on tests rather than to actually speak English? Seoul-based essayist, broadcaster, & Los Angeles Review of Books Korea Blog writer Colin Marshall joins Korea FM’s Chance Dorland to discuss the negative consequences of Korea’s ESL industry he describes as a cancer.


7 English-friendly Korean Clothing Sites

***Hello everyone! If you are new to buying Korean clothing, please read my personal notice.***

Bongja (#4)
Twin Look: $20.27USD

Hotping (#5)
Just One (#1)

* Korean clothes are usually small for non-Asians. Remember that measurement is key and the measurement in Korea is different from anywhere else, especially shoes. Of course measurements vary so remember clothing is in the imperial system. Free size clothing may not work in America but, in Korea free size does work because women body shapes are generally similar. If you have big hips, be aware of them while shopping for pants. Accessories like rings may be too small for many ladies so look out for the ring sizes as well. Please find your shoe size on this website.

September 12th Meeting Registration Now Open!!

Roll up, Roll up ~ Another 3 weeks has passed since we last met up with some of our lovely makgeolli loving friends, to eat, drink and banter, and it […]

Baesangmyeon Neurin Maeul Brewery Tour – September 6th

 

Sansawon Poster 3-01

Date: Sunday, September 6th.

Time: 9am – 6.30pm

Place: Pocheon City, Gyeonggido.

What:  Transportation, Lecture, Guided Tour, Lunch, Unlimited Tastings


Andalusian Summer Cycling and pre-Bulgaria, Greece and onwards…


Relaxing in the English room in between classes. #teacher...



Relaxing in the English room in between classes. #teacher #english #셀스타그램


Classroom Criminal Justice: Enforce Behavior, Drop the Ax, But Keep It FUN!

Coming into the ESL field later in life presents a challenge for me. Without time on my side, I know I need to get training whenever it’s available. I took on obtaining ESL-related certifications along the way. Since coming to Korea I got a TESOL certification, a Business English certification, and my teaching license from back home.

In addition, EPIK holds training modules at times, and although they’re not the most in-depth, hands-on training, they’re better than nothing. You can usually walk away having learned something. Over time, a lot of little things add up to a big thing.


How You Can Make ESL a Long-Term Career

Teaching ESL abroad is becoming more and more popular by the day for a multitude of reasons.

First, there is a bad economic disease circulating the globe and as much as the spin doctors try to paint a rosy picture of improvement, things are still just bad. Jobs are not only less plentiful, but requirements have become more robust and often people are being asked to do far more for less pay these days. This is assuming you can find a job within your line of work in the first place.


Classroom Management: Setting Rules and Expectations for a Smooth Running Year

As a public school ESL instructor in South Korea, I know that my requirements and authority level are limited in comparison to my Korean counterpart, or co-teacher. Still, in my situation where I teach half the classes and my co-teacher the other, I’m still bearing the full weight of what happens during each 40 minute session. That is, I’m not just responsible for covering the material but also maintaining my sanity based on how smoothly the classes run.

Noone is really concerned whether or not your classes are organized and streamlined. The co-teacher cares some, but that’s usually because it has a bearing on how much involvement will be required of them. Other than that, noone from the Department of Education is concerned, no principle or vice-principal is taking note, etc. It’s up to you (and me) to ensure that our classroom management skills are effective and put in place. For our own sake.


Blackout Poetry (Part 1)

This week I did a lesson on blackout poetry with my intermediate level high school students! Normally the project is done with texts from newspapers, magazines or novels, but I was worried about the vocabulary being too broad/out of reach. I wanted my students to focus on having fun, being creative, and playing with the language, rather than looking up/learning new words. So instead, I typed up a batch of their weekly English essays, omitted the names, and returned them for use with this assignment! Not only did this assure that the vocabulary was appropriate, it also made the assignment more personal and interesting!


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