It’s not “goodbye.” It’s “안녕히 계세요.”

2-3 students

Goodbyes are always tough. But yesterday, during my last day as an English teacher at Ulsan Sports Science School, I experienced a whole new level of emotional farewells. Over the past year, I was fortunate enough to be surrounded by wonderful coworkers and enthusiastic students, all of whom consistently went above and beyond with their generosity, kindness and sincerity to make me feel welcomed and cared for.

Quantitative survey analyses and learning as acquisition:

3 types of Learning: Acquisition, Participation, and Construction

 3 types of Learning: Acquisition, Participation, and Construction

In my masters studies, some ideas are good. Here's one:

Learning is a conceptual and linguistic construction.
In other words, there is no single concept that covers the entire spectrum of what learning actually is.

Why? Because learning does not have a clear physical or identity in the world.
It is a concept constructed and developed by people to label and explain some complex processes.

So, depending on the paradigm you find yourself in, or what kind of methods you decide to choose in educational research, your view on what learning is and what it covers changes.

What to Show on Your Slides


"Discourse shapes the world" part 2

"Discourse shapes the world"

This is an idea I have been toying with for a while.

In work, in masters study, and in life.

The point is basically, that discourse shapes the world.
That is is neatly tied up.
But to bring some more ideas out:
- the way we perceive the world, the way we interact and color other people's lenses changes the way they think about us (workplace relations) or other things (share market -> Taleb or George Solomon). And pretty much whatever they think about us (through discourse) has a greater impact on the relations of results rather than more objective matters such as things we can measure.

So I typed "discourse shapes the world" into google and sure enough other people have written about the same ideas. So I want to read and see what they have written about the subject.

Notably, Focault. I needed to touch upon him during undergrad studies, but didn't like him then.

Age Ain’t Nothin But A Preference

Today’s article is written for the Reach To Teach Teach Abroad Blog Carnival, a monthly series that focuses on providing helpful tips and advice to ESL teachers around the globe. The host for this month is Rebecca Thering, and here‘s where you can read the rest of this month’s posts. I’ll be posting a new ESL-related article on my blog on the 5th of every month. Check back for more articles, and if you’d like to contribute to next month’s Blog Carnival, please contact Dean at, and he will let you know how you can start participating!

Actions Speak Louder Than Language Barriers

Today I received a wonderful compliment from one of my high school students. To give some context to the essay snippet below: I teach at a public boarding school where the students stay on-campus 5 or 6 nights a week. Most of them are from the area, so they can easily go home on the weekend. But some, like the student in this story, have to travel 4+ hours one way by bus, so they don’t go home nearly as often. It’s hard on all of them, but especially so for those who only see their friends and family once every few weeks or months.

Reflective Practice: The true value of "lived experience" and why we must first do then think.

Here I will talk about how to become a better teacher through reflective practice.
Reflective practice is the key between the dichotomy I drew between thinkers and doers, describing that you need to act in the world first before you think; and that there are different forms of knowledge that are produced in the world: one is derived from experience (reflective practice), but another (theory-based) is driven away from experience (body) towards the abstract and context-less (mind). These two different forms of knowledge (reflective practice vs theory-based) and the activities that produce that knowledge are in fact in competition with each other for legitimacy, gaining speed in recent times.

RTBC Day Thirteen: What’s in your edtech toolbox?

So, I totally fell off the wagon with this 30-day reflective teaching blog challenge…which I started back in September or October of last year. But I’m BACK on board!

Name the top edtech tools that you use on a consistent basis in the classroom, and rate them on their perceived (by you) effectiveness.

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