Skip to Content

education

Book Review – 한시와 한문이야기 – 이권재

Hanshiwa Hanmun Iyagi

한시와 한문이야기
Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose Stories

Bibliographic Summary


Q&A: Best Major for Teaching English Abroad

I receive many questions through both my YouTube channel and Red Dragon Diaries blog. I get a bit of everything, but some of the important questions regarding teaching English abroad center around college majors and TESOL certifications.

Both of these things can impact your options when looking to secure a teaching job abroad. Much of it depends on the country or even school that you’re interested in applying to.

See the accompanying Q&A dealing with what teaching certifications are best?

What Major is best?


Classical Chinese on the Korean College Scholastic Ability Test (Suneung)


Anti-Education and My 50% Success Rate at Answering Korean English Exam Questions

So, I am an Englishman flown in to South Korea to help educate their young in English.  In my school my level of English is obviously unmatched (I am English after-all) so why is it I am so bad at answering English exam questions in Korea?

Perhaps I only ever get asked about the tricky questions, or maybe I am just a dumbass, but it turns out that I am right about 50% of the time in my estimation.  In many ways it is embarrassing, why can't a reasonably well educated native English speaker, from England, who has spoken, read, listened and wrote in English all his life, answer questions correctly in a country where the overall level of English is poor (this is not a criticism, just simply that English is not their first language)?

Peter Clarke

By Ray Hyland

The first adults you meet in life will forever leave an impression. Family notwithstanding you rely on your teachers and headmasters to guide you along the early roads.


The Good, The Bad, The Impossible All Have Something to Teach Us

Hey, teachers, both ESL and good old fashioned first language educators: do kids annoy the shit out of you sometimes? Oh, absolutely! Children are unpredictable as hell. One day, the little angel can turn into a little asshole. Heck, they can do that in the span of one class. Then there are the ones who are never nice, the little sociopaths seem to want to stop at nothing to turn your psyche into a puddle of sad goo, waiting to be dumped into the nearest drain, flushed away with your self-esteem, hopes and dreams.

But not all experiences are like the bleak picture described above. If they were, I am not sure anyone would have the fortitude to withstand a day in a classroom, let alone a year. For those that could, you get my eternal gratitude, and any drugs I could find for you.

Even the assholes usually have a reason why they are assholes. And, like their swing toward terror from angel, terrors do occasionally swing back to angel, often unexpectedly.


Queer Links from the Week


Makgeolli School – An Adventure in Tasting

Rating and Opening

A while ago our MMPK staff and a few die-hard makgeolli lovers got together for a night of education and tasting wonderment.  We wanted to improve our own knowledge of just what is out there, so we can then pass it on to our fellow Mamas & Papas.  We couldn’t have chosen a better place than Makgeolli School right near Isu station.


Homeward Bound? Not Likely.

As I’m sitting here, I wonder if I’m really even capable of blogging about this without it turning into some chaotic rant on the state of public education.  Probably not, but I feel like I need to say something about what’s been going on in public education in my home state.

See, when you’re an expat, even a well-adjusted one like I consider myself, you always miss home.  You get excited about going home.  You think about your favorite things to eat, the people you love, and all the stuff you’re going to see and do when you get back to the world you know and love. 

Over the past couple of weeks, through a draconian near-dismemberment of public education, the state of North Carolina has made pretty sure I won’t be going home when our time here in Korea is up.  And it’s not just because of the money, although not being paid for the Masters degree that I earned is a pretty serious affront.


Why do we need teachers

Human resources are the bane and the boon for any organization.  We see that the push for business is to reduce the dependency on people, and push automation into every aspect of business.  Will it be the same for teachers?

I actually talked with another (Korean) hagwon owner, and he was contemplating starting a hagwon without teachers.  My interest was peaked: “How would that be possible?”.  I listened carefully to his business plan which would come down to kids sitting in front of computer screens.  I can understand the benefit of computers, but I am not sure if this kind of interface is the one we need for our kids.


Syndicate content

Koreabridge
Facebook Group


Features @koreabridge
Blogs   @koreablogs
Job Ads  @koreabridgejobs
Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge Google+ Community