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Hopeful Wishing

 

I work four hours a day in Korea. It’s great. In the States I’d be working more than twice that to maintain the same income. Even more hours would be needed to realize the same lifestyle I enjoy here (nothing outlandish, I assure you). The Koreans with whom I work are not paid as much as I am for the same work. They work more hours than I do as well.


Supermarkets -v- the People?

 

It has been bothering me since about the time it has been instigated. It’s a simple thing that shouldn’t really get me agitated as it has very little effect on me, and in many respects it is a good principal to take. It’s just that I think it’s the wrong step and I don’t think it really solves any problems, only encourages more populist resolutions to complicated social and economic problems.

What am talking about? Sunday closing for the so-called discount stores in Korea.

Now lets establish some terminology first.

“Discount stores” are what major supermarket chains are called in Korea. These include E-Mart (part of Shinsaegae international), Homeplus (owned by Tesco, the second largest supermarket company in the world), and Lotte Mart, which are the biggest ones.


K-Pop and the Future of Korea

Many Westerners who come to Korea to live or to visit quickly write off K-pop, Korea's mainstream music genre, as a cheesy, sugar-coated excuse for entertainment. They see outlandish costumes, boys in heavy eyeliner, and flamboyant choreographed dance moves.  They become annoyed with strange Engrish lyrics and seemingly identical tunes that blare from just about every storefront of the country.  But, what they don't realize is that K-pop is much bigger than skinny jeans and plastic faces.  In fact, K-pop is transforming Korea as the world knows it.

Nostalgia for a Despot: an Armchair Perspective of Korea’s Present

The big talking point in the land of the morning calm is undoubtedly the election of the conservative party candidate Park Geun Hye to the presidency. Park’s father is man by the name of Park Chung Hee, whose name is both revered and reviled in Korea. Park Geun Hye is a woman, but more in the vein of Margaret Thatcher, where it could be argued gender is incidental.

Park’s election has sparked plenty of talk due to her relationship with her father who ruled this nation with a very controversial iron fist for the best part of two decades in the 1960s and 1970s. While I didn’t follow the election race in too much depth, I know that Park’s victory ticked all the boxes in terms of surprise, disappointment, doom, and any other negative or positive political emotion you can think up.


Flying long distance on the cheap

Economy, long-haul, pleasant, quiet; All adjectives that are expected in a sentence riddled with sarcasm when describing any long distance flight trapped in inexpensive class.

My experience with Japan Airlines was as expected, complete with crying babies, weak bladdered individuals and my curse of being unable to sleep on public transport. Fortunately, the duration of the flight had enough entertainment to keep me occupied.


Last 3 Weeks in Korea- LPGA Win #100, Soldier Curfew, & CC Fees

1. National
 
1) Nayeon Choi’s win marks 100th LPGA win for Koreans
Korea’s Nayeon Choi won the LPGA Malaysia Tournament on Oct 16, her first win of the season, and the 100th for Korean female golfers, after beating Taiwan’s Yani Tseng by a stroke. The first LPGA win was by Okhee Ku who won the Standard Register Turquoise Classic in 1988. The 2nd and 3rd was by Oksoon Koo who won LPGA Toray Open in Japan 1994 and 1995 straight. The flood started in 1998 when rookie Seri Park won four LPGA wins, including two majors, in one season. Other Korean girls that have contributed 100th win are Mihyun Kim and Jiaye Shin with 8 wins each, Grace Park and Heewon Han with 6 wins, and Nayeon Choi with 5 wins.

Korea News Talk - Economic Downturn, Union Protests, & Sodium Levels


57:52 minutes (26.49 MB)
Korea News Talk#3
August 20, 2011
A collaborative project brought to you by 
KoreaBusinessCentral.com & Koreabridge.net

Participants: Adam Cave, Stafford Lumsden, Charles Ahn, Daniel Lafontaine, & Jeff Lebow

Topics: The effect of  the U.S. credit downgrade and global economic downturn on Korea, SC First Bank and Hanjin Union issues,  HomePlus/Tesco Success,  Samsung's pass on Android, & Korea's sodium standing
 


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It’s Getting Worse: JPY/KRW is Killing JapanInc

Could It Get Any Worse? Apparently, Yes
Toyota’s profits have plunged, and the Japanese giant has refused to release financial projections due to the supply-chain disruptions that have resulted from the tragic earthquake. The Financial Times article also briefly mentions Hyundai-Kia, and the tremendous market share growth over the past year. The Japanese auto-manufacturers vs Korean ones is being dictated by Korea, helped by the continuing strength in the JPY, and most particularly, the strong JPY/KRW exchange rate.


Mental note: Don't throw money to Chinese children

Mental note: Don't throw money to Chinese children

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