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A Guide to Understanding Korean (School) Culture for Guest English Teachers

Editor’s Note from Jeff: This was written by a Korean elementary school teacher as an assignment for my Cross-Cultural Communication course. The task was to “prepare a guide for improving cross-cultural communication and interactions in your workplace”.  Since many Guest English Teachers will be starting school this week, I thought it was the right time to publish this. Hopefully, it will encourage a useful discussion about how Korean Teachers and Guest English Teachers can work together to create a positive learning/working environment.   Thanks very much to Jessi for agreeing to post this here.



2013 Busan Sunset Live Preview (Part 2)


The Koreans of Europe

No two cultures are the same but every one is similar, right? You could certainly say that about much of Europe, where thousands of years of breeding, trading, warring, traveling, and sharing across ever-shifting borders has caused a mixology of international characteristics of which one can be difficult to discern from the other.

In Asia, it is a little more difficult to separate the differences because the continent has suffered less fluctuation of its borders, and in terms of today’s map, colonialism for the most part decided on today’s borders. But still you can throw in the changes, regardless of actual influence, of international trade, development, colonialism, the sharing of ideas, television, and migration, and the wind at the weekend if you wish, and you will soon realise the stark similarities between peoples and cultures there.


The 6th annual Salsa Festival in Busan


Mission Statement

Music. It’s been part of me for every step I’ve taken in this life. I’ve studied, taught, performed, promoted and produced. Since moving to Korea 4 years ago, music has taken control. This has opened the door to a vibrant music scene that perhaps many people don’t realize is happening right under their noses. Even when Korean promotors and bands actively pursue foreigners for attendance at their shows, all the necessary info is rarely translated or distributed properly. There are amazing artists that are doing their thing in dingy basement clubs and most expats never know.

I’m no insider. But I do find myself regularly trying to get my friends to see bands that I find incredibly interesting. Hopefully, if you’re reading this blog, you’ll learn about a new venue or festival or band that will change the way you think about arts in Busan.


From Korea With Love – Podcast Episode 1


My EPIK Medical Check-Up

Makin’ PatBingsu at Stumpy Ruffers


Daegu Theatre Troupe & The YMCA Youth Project!

 


Gwangju Day 2 – 5.18 Memorial Park & Downtown

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