Market Makgeolli Tasting Class 1 – Registration Open!!

Fall into the world of Dakpaper dolls in Bukchon Hanok Village!!

Dakpaper is Korean traditional paper made from Korean Mulberry trees named Dak-namu (namu means tree.) Since the texture of the dakpaper is soft yet strong, people have used the paper to make handicrafts. One of them is dakpaper doll. Dakpaper dolls usually give a warm feeling due to its texture. Jaebin H went to Cho Kyung-Wha workshop and made a pretty doll out of dakpaper. Let’s hear how much she enjoyed this activity!

Cho Kyung-wha Dakpaper Doll Workshop


Make an one-of-a-kind handkerchief by natural dyeing

Natural dyeing is one of the oldest Korean traditions that harmoniously blend nature into daily lives. Using ingredients like persimmon or anil (a plant used to make an indigo color), people have produced fabrics in many different delicate colors. Even though most of dyeing process has been replaced by factories’ machines using artificial chemicals, a number of people have passed down the traditional way of dyeing.

Jaebin H, one of our Trazy users, succeeded in dyeing a handkerchief with a beautiful color. Why don’t we follow her footsteps of the handkerchief dyeing?

New book is out! How to Thrive in South Korea: 97 Tips from Expats

Stop answering all those newbie questions! Just send 'em to this book.

My Review of ‘The Interview’: Dumb, but Mildly Subversive


I know this came out awhile back and almost everyone has seen it now. But my review just went up at the Lowy Institute, so here is my local mirror of that post.

South Korean Love Industry

“The beauty of nomadic life is that you’re detached from the flaws of the surrounding society while you soak up the best it has to offer. You’re an observer. You have no stake. You’re just passing through.”- Richard Boudreaux


Design Your Modern Heritage Wedding at Conrad Seoul

As tourism continues to grow here in Seoul, so do the reasons for it. In the recent past, tourists from all corners of the globe have made the trek to Korea to experience its traditional and pop culture, delicious food and fantastic shopping facilities. But over the past year or so, more and more international couples are making their way to the Korean capital to say their vows.

Attracted by the sophisticated styles and romantic surroundings portrayed in Korean films and dramas, love birds throughout Asia, and even as far as the Americas, are deciding to say, "I do" in the swanky wedding halls and hotel ballrooms of the Korean capital.

Crawling Through Windows

IMG_1889Without a doubt, art is one of the most defining elements of any culture. It captures the spirit of people, places and time, and expresses mood, opinion, and thought, in such a way that transcends even the greatest of language barriers. Whether it be a song, play, dance or a visual composition like pottery, painting or drawing, every piece of art is a window into that culture’s world. When we attempt to learn about and experience other cultures, sometimes it’s enough to remain on the outside looking in; to go to a museum or a gallery, or attend a concert or production.

Negativity, Sensitivity, And Defending Your Country

I read an article recently discussing Korean sensitivity and explaining why Koreans are ‘hyper sensitive to criticisms from non-Koreans’. Before I even started reading, I felt that the answer was pretty obvious: surely Koreans don’t like it because the people complaining aren’t Korean themselves. In my eyes, it’s understandable why, as a native, you’d get annoyed by foreigners coming into your country, only to moan about the way the country is run.

Grab Your Traveling Spoon and Get a Taste of Korean Culture

Some of the best memories of my travels involve sharing a meal with the local people. From slurping up chanko at a sumo wrestling championship with a Japanese couple in Tokyo to picnicking with Tibetan monks in India to chowing down on tajine with Berber nomads in the middle of the Sahara Desert, the experience combines the very best two ways to get to know a country's culture: conversing with the locals and eating the food.

Such experiences are often spontaneous, as getting a chance to interact with the local people isn't always easy. After all, it's kinda difficult to walk up to a stranger and invite them to share a meal, without looking like a crazy person, that is.

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