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Buddhism

Kuiwon’s Classical Chinese Primer – Third-Person Pronouns

Gu'unmong

The Cloud Dream of the Nine (九雲夢, 구운몽) was the first Korean novel to be translated into English in 1922. It is uncertain whether the work was originally written in Hangul or Classical Chinese.

Third Person Pronouns & Demonstratives


Book Review – 論語注疏(논어주소) 정태현 이성민 역

Noneojuso

論語注疏(논어주소) — 鄭太鉉(정태현)-李聖敏(이성민) 譯
Analects Annotated by He Yan and Xing Bing
Translated by Jeong Taehyeon and Yi Seongmin

Bibliographic Summary


Winter Hiking in South Korea: Part 2 통도사, 비로엄, 영축산 and 신불산 (Tongdosa, Biroam, Yeongchuksan and Sinbulsan)


Follow Us Around Haeundae!

Follow Us Around videos are highly requested, and we love filming them! It feels like we’re hanging out all day. :) On this day we wandered around Haeundae, where we hadn’t visited since before summer! We like it a lot more without the throngs of people in the summer. We could probably do a couple “Follow Us Around Haeundae” videos that show you different areas of the neighborhood.

In this video we covered Haeundae station, the market, the area around Paradise Hotel, and the temple by the sea, Haedong Yonggungsa! Hope you enjoyed the video, and stay tuned for more “Follow Us Around” videos! If you have any neighborhood requests, let us know!




Haedong Yonggungsa – Dragon Temple by the Sea!

We didn’t always enjoy going to temples in Korea. In fact, I thought that while the temples were visually interesting, that they all looked the same. I got bored with them very quickly. That changed once I met Dale from Dale’s Korean Temple Adventures, a well-known blog in Korea. He also lives in Yangsan, and even works at the school just down the street from mine!


Getting Started with Meditation

by Jesse Diaz

Every aspiring meditator this day and age is beset by a crisis that would seem alien to truth seekers, ages back. The crisis I speak of is one of choice. Back in the day, choices of tradition or teacher were limited depending on one’s culture and good fortune to encounter somebody with skill, knowledge and the ability to instruct. Dubious teachers have always been hazards along the way for a determined aspirant, though usually for lack of options rather than a glut of them. Nowadays, however, it indeed seems that if you can dream it, you can buy it -to slightly modify Dr. Frank N. Furter’s inspirational adage.


석가탄신일: Buddha’s Birthday

 

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Samgwangsa Temple in Busan


Nothing Stops A God

It looks like the people who wrote this movie are fully aware of the trouble with Superman: nothing can stop a god, since a god is, obviously, immortal, perfect, and, yeah, unstoppable. That’s the Platonic view which probably got Socrates in trouble with the Athenians—who executed him on a cross of hemlock!—dying for a love of knowledge rather than our sins!—but to go even further, and to look at God from the perspective of Islam, and Ali Farka Toure, God Is Unique; there is nothing like God, nothing can be compared to It; It cannot have arms, legs, thoughts, feelings, or any recognizable features. This philosophical view naturally eliminates any possibility of drama, since if God Is Unique, and everywhere and everywhen and nowhere and nowhen, then It’s also doing everything and nothing, and there’s no plot, no tension, no payoff.


Haedong Yonggungsa and Gwanyang Maehwa Festival

With another bitter and icy dry winter over in Korea, the emergence of the short but pleasant spring season is being warmly welcomed by people across the peninsula. With all my vacation days used during the winter breaks, trips are now limited to within the country until my contract ends in June (I won’t be renewing, but that is another blog story, one I’m not sure I will write…). With the football season in Korea having begun it is a little difficult to find the time for more cultural trips, but so far I have managed to make two rather pleasing, and interesting ones.

Several weeks back, when I wasn’t quite sure if spring had arrived and the sky was a deceptive bright sky blue, I went to Haedong Yonggungsa with Miju. Whilst most Buddhist temples in Korea can be found in the mountains, this one is perched precariously on the rocks that greet the East Sea, just north of Busan.


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