Work

Work with busanfood.com

busanfood.com is committed to providing reliable, impartial information for the wide variety of restaurants available in our fair city. Since I started the site in early 2016, it has rapidly gained a large following, and I currently get over 500 visits within 24 hours of posting a new restaurant review. The majority of which come from the local Busan community. There are several ways you can connect with busanfood.com:

Sponsored Post –If you are the owner of a restaurant, old or new, and would like some exposure in the community, you can sponsor me to visit and publish a review. I will only publish reviews from sponsored restaurants I truly stand behind, to maintain the integrity of the site.

Articles – If you are involved with any local publication, I would be interested in working with you to help expand and promote the local culinary scene in Busan

If interested in the above, please contact me on: josephgreenwood1@hotmail.co.uk


The Madness That Is Winter Camp

Last Friday was a very good day for me: it was the last day of Winter Camp at school, and the start of a 5 week holiday. So it’s not surprising that I was in a pretty good mood. But, distracting me from my happiness was the horrible feeling of an entirely achey body, eyes which would barely stay open, and a general ill-feeling. Why? Because after 10 days of Winter Camp, I was exhausted.


Korean Education: High Grades, High Pressure… Low Happiness?

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What is the point of school? To get good grades? To make friends and have fun? To teach you about life and help you to become independent? Well I think that all three things are important. Unfortunately in Korea, I have seen far too much emphasis placed on the first thing: to get good grades. Of course, it’s well known that some of the best academic results in the world come from South Korea, and Western schools could certainly learn a lesson or two from the Koreans about how to gain such success. But what the Korean Education system surely lacks is balance, and the realisation that sometimes, less is more.


Letter to Korea, August 2014

Dear Korea,


Booting

 

There are times when I wish I could get a new computer, but I worry what I’d do with all that lost time. Now, I sit and I wait. I tap at my phone, which sometimes feels just as slow. There is a whine and and grind, and a flicker inside behind all the plastic tells me that something is eventually going to happen.


Hopeful Wishing

 

I work four hours a day in Korea. It’s great. In the States I’d be working more than twice that to maintain the same income. Even more hours would be needed to realize the same lifestyle I enjoy here (nothing outlandish, I assure you). The Koreans with whom I work are not paid as much as I am for the same work. They work more hours than I do as well.


Letter from Korea, October 2013

Suwon, Korea
Ocotober, 2013

Dear Ireland,

It has been well over a month since myself, Herself, and +1 have been back in Korea, and what I expected would be my September letter got left by the wayside and is only being seen to now in October. You know you’ll get the usual excuses for not doing anything which isn’t vital to one’s survival, such as being busy with things which are vital to one’s own survival.

After two and a bit months in Ireland, returning to Korea for life, work, and more life, was less the shock we had thought it might be. A smaller home, no garden, no dog, less rain, and that view from all the way up at the top of our tower just seemed to be what was right at the time. There seems to be less culture shock the more we travel between Ireland and Korea.


Caroline vs. the Job Market: Part One

And so it begins…again.

Following a friend’s recent post concerning the trauma that is post-Korea job-hunting, I felt it unavoidable to chronicle my own thoughts on the matter. As I’m certain it will be an ongoing trauma, consider this Part One.

Of all the terrible jobs I’ve done in my time, I feel perfectly confident in telling you that the worst one of all was the job of finding the terrible jobs I then did. This is saying a fair amount considering that I spent Boxing Day 2011 publicly cleaning Stilton soup from a lady’s shoe.


Korean Work Nights Out

Work Do
Old picture of a tame work do with just the ladies
Every payday in England my work mates and I would meet up after work and go out for a few drinks. Generally there'd be some people who would make excuses and slip away after one, others that had to drive and some that would try and just have a couple before their other halves came to pick them up.

“Getting There”

This is a short narrative post I initially set out to write for Groove Magazine‘s “Share Story, Win Trip” writing competition. The call came out for ‘funny’ travel stories where a lesson was learned. The winning pieces would be read out loud dramatically. Frankly, there just aren’t enough of these kind of encouraging writing opportunities in Korea. I could say more but I’ll get distracted.

I started writing mine and about two paragraphs from the end I decided that it wasn’t a travel story. So I stopped writing. I came back about a week later and took another crack at it, tidied it up but left it loosely over the 500 word limit, which kind of left it for any kind of flash litt and too short to be considered anything else. Still it’s a good story. You’ll laugh. I hope. 

Getting There


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