tesol

An Online TEFL Course: Not the Most Terrible Idea

Online TESOL certifications

Just Do the CELTA

I’ve always said that if you’re going to do a TEFL course of some kind, you may as well go big and awesome and just do the CELTA. Sure, it’s expensive, coming in at around $2000 USD, and time-consuming (120 hours, usually done intensively over one month), but at the end of it, you’re going to have something of value. Even though employers in Korea and other parts of Asia often have no idea what it is, it’s well-recognized throughout Europe, the Middle East and North America.


Are the “Glory Days” of Teaching ESL in Korea Over?

Teaching ESL is a mixed bag depending on what country you target. In some countries it’s a refined, streamlined endeavor where employers seek qualified and experienced teachers and the government has mandatory guidelines as well. To obtain a work visa in a certain country, a government may actually require a teacher have a TESOL certification and/or a certain amount of experience.

In other countries, this isn’t always the case. In China, it’s a little bit of both it seems.

There were once days in places like Korea and Japan where anyone could roll off a plane and be offered a teaching job on their way to their hotel. Those days are over in some countries, and many others are following suit.


Teach ESL Abroad to Travel Like a Pro

ITA - Photo Logo 300 x 250Among the many reasons why teaching ESL abroad rocks is travel. Being in the country you teach in is travel in and of itself. Take for example South Korea, which is where I am.


Teaching English Without a Degree: Countries to Consider

  Finding a Teaching Job Without a Degree: Difficult It’s time for some straight-talk about teaching English without a degree. It’s going to be difficult-really difficult because most of the jobs out there require a degree and by most, I mean like 99%. So, you’re basically competing for that last 1% and the news doesn’t

The post Teaching English Without a Degree: Countries to Consider appeared first on .


So today I was explaining to 3rd graders why Captain Hook wants...



So today I was explaining to 3rd graders why Captain Hook wants revenge on Peter Pan. I asked them if they knew what ‘revenge’ is. My co-teacher decided to chime in with an example. She started off with, “Imagine someone murdered your father!…” LMAO my face was like well that escalated quickly. Made me think of Princess Bride.


Classroom Criminal Justice: Enforce Behavior, Drop the Ax, But Keep It FUN!

Coming into the ESL field later in life presents a challenge for me. Without time on my side, I know I need to get training whenever it’s available. I took on obtaining ESL-related certifications along the way. Since coming to Korea I got a TESOL certification, a Business English certification, and my teaching license from back home.

In addition, EPIK holds training modules at times, and although they’re not the most in-depth, hands-on training, they’re better than nothing. You can usually walk away having learned something. Over time, a lot of little things add up to a big thing.


How You Can Make ESL a Long-Term Career

Teaching ESL abroad is becoming more and more popular by the day for a multitude of reasons.

First, there is a bad economic disease circulating the globe and as much as the spin doctors try to paint a rosy picture of improvement, things are still just bad. Jobs are not only less plentiful, but requirements have become more robust and often people are being asked to do far more for less pay these days. This is assuming you can find a job within your line of work in the first place.


Classroom Management: Setting Rules and Expectations for a Smooth Running Year

As a public school ESL instructor in South Korea, I know that my requirements and authority level are limited in comparison to my Korean counterpart, or co-teacher. Still, in my situation where I teach half the classes and my co-teacher the other, I’m still bearing the full weight of what happens during each 40 minute session. That is, I’m not just responsible for covering the material but also maintaining my sanity based on how smoothly the classes run.

Noone is really concerned whether or not your classes are organized and streamlined. The co-teacher cares some, but that’s usually because it has a bearing on how much involvement will be required of them. Other than that, noone from the Department of Education is concerned, no principle or vice-principal is taking note, etc. It’s up to you (and me) to ensure that our classroom management skills are effective and put in place. For our own sake.


How to Be an Excellent, Award-Winning ESL Teacher

During my time here in Korea, I’ve had the opportunity to meet some great teachers. One of those teachers is my friend, Candice, from South Africa. It’s possible you’ve watched her in other videos of mine including one of her award-winning classes she presented to the Busan Office of Education.

Back in 2012 Candice was recognized by the Office of Education as the standout GET (Guest English Teacher) in all of Busan.


Tough TEFL Love


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