teaching English in Korea

Teaching English in a Korean University: How to Get the Job

teaching-english

If there’s anything you can count on me for, it’s this: I’ll give it to you straight and not sugar-coat the hard stuff. If you’re looking for a job teaching English in a Korean university, this is the stuff that you might not want to hear:

#1: It’s Very Difficult to Get a Uni Job in Korea These Days


Korea: Don’t Waste your Time

Korea, don't waste your time

A Reader Question from E.J.

“I am now beginning my second year of teaching  in Korea. I was calculating  how I’m doing with my student loans and how long it might take me to pay them off (which is looking like quite a while). That got me thinking about.. well, everything. Specifically, I want to make sure I’m spending my time wisely while I’m here in Korea. As a teacher, I have a nice chunk of free time and I try to use that in the most meaningful ways possible.


Why South Korea isn’t the Place for Serious English Teachers

In my opinion, Korea really is not the place for serious English teachers. By “serious English teacher,” I mean ones that are well-qualified (CELTA/DELTA, MA TESOL/Linguistics, or are qualified teachers back in their home countries) and experienced (5+ years teaching a variety of levels, classes and ages).


Shanghai 2: Jing'an Sculpture Park & Temple, Crystal Galleria

Teaching in Korea: When is it time to go home?

It’s Been a Decade Well Korea, it’s been a decade. And we’ve had a good few years, filled with enough awesome to last a lifetime. Seriously. I feel like I’ve compressed 50 years worth of living into 10 and I’d never trade my time here for anything. And I have absolutely no regrets about moving

The post Teaching in Korea: When is it time to go home? appeared first on .


Korean Students Write the Darndest Things

Part of my job as a high school English teacher in South Korea involved giving out, and then correcting, weekly creative writing assignments. It quickly became one of my favorite parts of the experience, as it allowed my students to apply the language with more freedom and personality. It also helped me to get to know them in a more private way. From unintentionally funny remarks, to profound realizations, their writing was a joy to read.

Below is a small collection of some of my favorite excerpts. I’ve also taken the liberty of underscoring their messages with related images. Perhaps this could have been made into some sort of class project… Enjoy!


Gamcheon Cultural Village

Seoul vs. Busan


Hwamyeong: Latte King


For a while I've been considering writing about specific places in Hwamyeong-dong - the neighbourhood in Buk-gu in which I live.  I wasn't entirely sure if anyone would be interested because Hwamyeong is really far out of the way.  That said, I've noticed that there are a number of new spots opening up (mostly because I can't help but stop when I see an iced Americano being advertised for the equivalent of a loonie [that's a buck for you non-Canadians]).  

Vlog Entry #20: One EPIK Year in Review

Tomorrow marks my last day as an English teacher with EPIK. Without a doubt, this year was full of the biggest challenges I’ve ever faced, but also the greatest adventures and people. As Avicii says in this video’s song: “All this time I was finding myself, and I didn’t know I was lost.”


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