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RTBC Day Twelve: Looking Ahead

Reflective Teaching Blog Challenge – Day Twelve: How do you envision your teaching changing over the next 5 years?

At the moment, I have no idea if I’ll still be teaching in Korea five years from now. Heck, I have no idea if I’ll still be teaching in Korea one year from now. But if I do end up staying for awhile, I’d like to experience these changes as an educator:


RTBC Day Eleven: The teacher becomes the student

Reflective Teaching Blog Challenge – Day Eleven: What is your favorite part of the school day? Why?


RTBC Day Ten: 5-4-3-2-1

Reflective Teaching Blog Day Ten: Share five random facts about yourself. Share four things from your bucket list. Share three things you hope for this year, as a person or an educator. Share two things that have made you laugh or cry as an educator. Share one thing you wish more people knew about you.

Five random facts:


RTBC Day Nine: Flying Solo

Reflective Teaching Blog Challenge – Day Nine: Write about one of your biggest accomplishments in your teaching that no one knows about (or may not care).

Part of being an English teacher in the EPIK program means working with a co-teacher in the classroom. However, this past week I was faced with the challenge/opportunity of teaching not one, but TWO classes all on my own! And get this: the students and I both survived, and maybe even thrived!

In the minutes before these classes, part of me was absolutely terrified to stand alone in front of a room full of students who barely understood a word I said. I dreaded the process of presenting vocabulary and explaining activities without my co-teacher being there to come to my rescue. And I almost had to sit down at the thought of how I would discipline the students if trouble came along.


RTBC Day Eight: What’s in your wallet?

Reflective Teaching Blog Challenge – Day Eight: What’s in your desk drawer and what can you infer from it?

Ok, you got me. This post isn’t about my wallet. Here’s what you’d find in my desk drawer(s) if you were to open it(them) at the moment:

 

Unused binder clips – Tells you I don’t like clipping things together, apparently.

Keys – Tells you I find the contents of my desk to be very precious, or at least worth locking away each night.

Tooth brush and tooth paste – Tells you Koreans take dental hygene very seriously (they brush their teeth after EVERY meal).

Tax exemption forms – Tells you I’m trying to keep Uncle Sam’s share of my earnings in South Korea for myself.

Plastic plates – These actually go with two suction cup/sticky balls I’ve used in class. Tells you I like to play games in class!


List of Required Documents for Applying to EPIK

Before you submit your documents to EPIK, make sure you have the following.


College Transcripts FAQs

sealWhat do they mean by “sealed?” A stamp or sticker over the back of the envelope, issued exclusively by your school.

Can/should I open my transcripts? Noooooooo! Don’t do it! EPIK won’t accept college transcripts with broken seals.

How many do I need? While I ordered four copies from my university, I only ever wound up using one (when I submitted all my documents in the final application stages). However, sometimes during the diploma apostille or visa issuance process they ask for them, apparently. ‘Didn’t happen to me, though.


Criminal Background Check FAQs

fbibackgroundcheck1What’s the deal with this CRC/criminal background check? If you are an American citizen applying to EPIK, part of your application must include an apostilled FBI background check (also known as a Criminal Record Check, CRC, for non-Americans). Basically they want to make sure they’re not letting a crazy outlaw loose on the future of their country.

Worried about a traffic ticket ruining your application? Don’t stress. The only offenses that will get you denied are those related to drugs, drinking, stealing, assault, etc. All you really have to be concerned with is that the background check/CRC is issued within 6 months of your E2 Visa application date.


College Diploma FAQs

apostille-exampleWhy do I need to include a copy of my diploma in the application? Having a college degree is one of the elligibility requirements for the EPIK program. Please note, though, that you should ultimately send EPIK a copy of your diploma and not the original, as it will no tbe returned to you.

Does the copy have to be in color? No, black and white is fine.

My diploma’s in Latin. Does that matter? Yes. Ask your university registrar for a copy of the English translation. Obtain that copy and staple it to the copy of your Latin diploma?


How to Prepare Your EPIK Application Documents

FBI Criminal Background Check (or, Criminal Record Check):


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