Teacher

How to Make Your EPIK Job Awesome #4 – Participate in Your School

This is the 4th part in a 5 part series about how to make your EPIK job awesome! Being an active participant in your school and having a good relationship with your coteacher(s) is so important. I really can’t stress this enough!


Most Used Teaching Websites for ESL

We will be posting our Monday video a little bit late today, so instead I’ve decided to share some teaching resources with you! If you have anything you think I should add, or if you have any questions about these resources, feel free to ask in the comments! :)

I teach Kindergarten and 3rd – 6th grade at a public elementary school. There are about 5 or 6 textbooks in circulation currently in Korea, and my school uses the books from YBM and YBM Si-sa.


Say What?! Episode 7: Koreans think I’m a criminal?

First of all I want to say thanks to all the new EPIK teachers on the Fall 2013 intake page for voting on the Say What?! video topics! I’m getting a lot more votes every week, and your input is invaluable. :)

The topic of this video is related to differences in ideas of personal space and service. When we are experiencing a new culture, it is best to identify and acknowledge these differences in order to save us from unwanted frustration. Not that these things NEVER frustrate me, they do, but calling it what it is, a cultural difference, and not a “fault” of the people or country, is EXTREMELY important.

Doing so will make the difference in your time spent in Korea, whether its for just one year or more. I know people that have been here for more than 5 years that still actively complain about their personal space being violated, and it seems to really put a damper on how they view Koreans as people and as a country. This notion makes me sad, because they’re letting such unimportant differences define not only Koreans, but their experience living here.

As I said, my personal space being violated IS frustrating to me, but I recognize that it is not a personal offense, I am living in a foreign culture, and sometimes that means being uncomfortable and accepting a different status quo. In other words, shake it off! See the best in people, you will be happier for it.

Any thoughts? I’d love to hear them in the comments!



The post Say What?! Episode 7: Koreans think I’m a criminal? appeared first on Evan and Rachel.


Korean Public School Class Schedule

If you are curious about the schedule of a public school teacher in Korea, I’ve shared mine in our most recent video! I’d say that my schedule is very basic and ideal. The classes are in large blocks with 10 minute breaks in between each class. My afternoons are free to plan for the next days classes, and I am able to teach one extra after school class for some extra money. As you can see, I teach each class once a week for 40 minutes. This isn’t ideal, but I work at a big school and there are too many students to teach them twice a week, so this will vary depending on your school.

Your schedule can change by semester or by the year, also depending on your school. My first year at this school I taught only 5th and 6th grade, so obviously I taught them 2-3x a week. Then they decided they wanted me to teach 3rd and 4th grade as well, and my schedule changed to what it is now.


Korean Public School Office Tour

I found this old video from my phone and wanted to share it with you guys! It’s a tour of my old office from the first year at my school, during my school’s festival. I’m in a different, better office now which I will do a tour of in the future. But if you’re curious what your office may look like as a public school teacher in Korea, here’s a quick glimpse!



The post Korean Public School Office Tour appeared first on Evan and Rachel.


Say What?! Episode 2: That’s a Holiday?

Happy Say What?! Wednesday! ^^

Episode 2 in our series highlights national holidays or “Red Days”. Usually when I see job ads for teaching positions online it vaguely says “All national holidays off”. Most people reading the job ad at first glance wouldn’t think twice about that, because it seems standard and straightforward. While the details on national holidays and other random days you get off of work may not be the most important information in the world, it’s something fun to know ahead of time! (Although some teachers may enjoy the surprise days off! I assure you those will still exist. hehe!)


You’re Not So ‘Sunny’ Outside This Classroom

As teachers, we are tasked not just with educating (a loaded word, depending on what is expected of you in your public school or hagwon), but of also remembering. That is, remembering our students’ names. Their English names.

 

And, there are a lot of names to remember.

And, there are a lot of names to remember.


고맙습니다, 선생님! (Thank you, Teacher!) ^^

 

IMG_0018

May 15th is Teacher’s Day in South Korea. On this special day, students give their teachers carnations or thank-you letters. Some prefer to give cosmetics or chocolates.

 

394375_644082432273104_927772010_nMy Korean students usually write me letters or give candies and chocolates on Teacher’s Day.


Spanish tutor for children

 

Hi I am Ana. I am teaching Spanish in Busan. I am studying in Kyunsung University. And I am from Córdoba in Andalucía           

First of all, I already have gotten a lot of experience teaching children subjects like maths, english, french, economics... Even now I am teaching in Busan children from the foreign school who need improve them spanish or math skills.


Who am I?

Who am I?

Well, I’m just your average 24-year old Canadian teaching English in Korea, finding my way through food, fitness and a foreign culture. Trying to figure out what I’m meant to do, what I have to share and how I want to live a life of fulfillment. Originally,  I dreamed that photography would be my goal, and so I pursued art school, and graduated with a BFA, Major in Photography from the Emily Carr University of Art+Design in Vancouver, BC. Upon completion of my school in 2010, I set out with hope and passion, excited to begin my new career as an aspiring photographer.


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