survival

5 Survial Tips not to get ripped off when using a taxi in Korea

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Recently there was an accident in Busan where a Japanese woman was ripped off by a taxi driver. When she asked for a receipt, 39,000 won was written on the sheet while the number on the taximeter was only 19,000 won. She asked the driver about the extra fee, knowing that the extra 20,000 won was added out of nowhere. The driver told her that it was a mistake. Luckily she only had to pay 19,000 won eventually, but she got enraged by how she was mistreated.

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Hopeful Wishing

 

I work four hours a day in Korea. It’s great. In the States I’d be working more than twice that to maintain the same income. Even more hours would be needed to realize the same lifestyle I enjoy here (nothing outlandish, I assure you). The Koreans with whom I work are not paid as much as I am for the same work. They work more hours than I do as well.


Yangyang Traditional Market

Across Korea traditional markets are still a common feature. Taking place every five days in towns and even cities, the markets give a brief insight into an older part of Korea. For the most part these markets are straightforward occasions and possibly a bit like you could imagine in the so-called olden days, drawing in all the local populace for not only business but also social reasons.

Throughout you can see people meeting and doing business, while at the same time there is a good quantity of back slapping and hearty laughing by the stalls. There are rows and rows of people, mostly old women it has to be said, selling what is clearly the excess from their small gardens, and for them it seems to be as much a chance to get out and meet people, with the added benefit of actually making some money.


Korean Bloodsuckers!

I was dreaming about writing this when I heard that all too familiar high-pitched whizzing buzz pass over my ear. I suppose it was an advantage that I got three more mosquito bites after the first one that had woken me from the itching. The extra bites really reminded me of the wonderful times I have had been woken repeatedly in the middle of the night courtesy of a flock of mosquitoes residing in my bedroom.

Yes, summer isn’t summer in Korea until you get your first bite at 2am and spend the next forty-five minutes chasing the tiny black vampire around the bedroom with whatever suitable implement comes to hand. Coming from Ireland, we have nothing like mosquitoes, in fact I didn’t even realise that there were ants in Ireland until last year. Korea, is not so lucky.


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