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Dear Korea #127 - Adorably Broke

Dear Korea #127

My weakness for cute stuff is so bad,  it’s embarrassing. Five years in Korea has left me with so much junk I’ll never actually need or use. It’s a sickness.


Insider Shopping Tip for Dongdaemun Market you won’t find else where!

 

Dongdaemun is one of tourists’ favorite shopping places. Although it is known as one of the famous shopping areas, people still don’t know much about how to shop well around this place.

For those who haven’t visited Dongdaemun or who don’t have much information about it, we will give you the one & only insider tips to go shopping in Dongdaemun.


Saturday in Seomyeon


Nampo-dong and Jagalchi Market


Joykolon: Your One-Stop-Shop for Korean Fashion's Spring Trends

Spring is upon us here in Seoul and I could not be happier. My excitement is not only for warmer temperatures, terrace coffees and cherry blossoms, but also spring fashion. And after hitting up a few of the shopping districts last weekend, let me just say that I am absolutely loving the trends for Spring 2015.

A Cheltenham Wishlist

So I learned recently that my home town Cheltenham is getting a Carluccio’s Italian restaurant, and I couldn’t have been more excited because it’s one of my favourite places to eat. And I realised that over the past couple of years there have been so many great additions to Cheltenham. After literally years of wishing for an H&M, one finally opened in 2013; Yo Sushi appeared to bring good sushi into the town (it was sad to say goodbye to Pizza Hut, but you can’t have everything); and Patisserie Valerie provided everyone with temptation to spend too much money on delicious pastries. There’s even a new Caribbean restaurant opening soon, which is very exotic and exciting.

Despite the great, and increasing, variety in Cheltenham, there are still a few eateries and shops which I’d love to see come to Cheltenham. Here’s my wishlist:

1) Pret


Moving To Korea: Top Tips I Wish I’d Known…

Coming to Korea was a huge, daunting move, and needless to say I did a lot of research beforehand; finding out about the culture and customs (bowing your head and removing your shoes inside), weather (yes, there definitely are 4 distinct seasons), and shopping (being told that buying clothes/shoes/underwear was pretty much impossible). 

The information I found was helpful, but ultimately it’s living here which gives you the best knowledge. So here, in hindsight, is what advice I’d give myself, and anyone else about to move to Korea.


Have Yourself a Korean Little Christmas

IMG_1782Merry Christmas from Korea! Besides a few twinkling roundabout decorations and lights hanging from windows of major shopping malls, Ulsan unfortunately doesn’t offer much in the way of holiday spirit. However, Busan is a whole different story!


My Favorite Things: Korean Gifts from Around the Net

With Christmas just around the corner, Seoul has quickly transformed into a winter wonderland. The twinkling lights that adorn the facades of the city's biggest shopping complexes, the familiar ring of the Salvation Army bell and even the never-ending loop of Mariah Carey's "All I Want for Christmas" have me feeling more festive than usual this year.

Perhaps this is partly due to the fact that I'll be going home to America for a few weeks to celebrate the holidays with my family. I couldn't be more excited and have been loading up on goodies and gifts to bring home for family and friends.

10 Ways That Korea Is Winning

All countries have good and bad points, things which we can either complain about or praise. And while Korea has it’s faults, today I’m going to focus on the good things: 10 things which give Korea definite cool points.

Oreo Cereal

alibaba.com

To the misery of Oreo-lovers everywhere, this cereal has been discontinued in every country…apart from South Korea. I regularly see it featured on lists along the lines of ‘foods we miss which no longer exist’. Well, come to Korea and stock up…

 

 

 


Market Man

Spending and Saving in South Korea


Bücher kaufen in Seoul: Youngpoong Bookstore

Ihr habt in Seoul bereits alles gesehen, und noch eine Menge Zeit auf der Uhr? Dann begebt euch nach Seouls Downtown – genauer gesagt nach Jongno – und verbringt entspannt eine Weile in Koreas größtem Buchladen “YP” (wobei der Begriff “Laden” praktisch leicht untertrieben wäre). Youngpoong YP Bookstore in Seoul Ja, es ist und bleibt ein Geschäft zum Bücher kaufen in

Der Beitrag Bücher kaufen in Seoul: Youngpoong Bookstore erschien zuerst auf Mayerkim.


Economical Eating In Korea- Be Healthy Without Being Bankrupt

Seoul Wandering


Hanging Out in Hyehwa

Once the center of Seoul's art and music scene, Hyehwa is a neighborhood bursting with creativity and youthful energy. The area is situated in the northeastern part of the capital and is also known as Daehangno, a nickname derived from dehag, or "university," because of its close proximity to a number of learning institutes.

Over the past decade, Hongdae has garnered the reputation of being Seoul's SoHo, lessening Hyehwa to a mere a notch in the history of the city's culture boom. Today, it remains off the radar to most tourists and is even overlooked by locals. Nevertheless, it remains to thrive as Seoul's theater district- with over 80 independent theaters showing performances on a daily basis- and is brimming with diverse, inexpensive eateries, eye-catching cafes and greenspaces to boot. The neighborhood, while seemingly typical on the surface, is one of surprises. It just takes a bit of digging to discover them.

Seoul Food Shopping

If you live in Seoul and have no time to grocery shop, Home Plus now offers virtual/mobile shopping!



Dear Korea #120

Look! A new update! Just like I promised! Also, thanks to everyone who came out to watch me stream this comic. Here’s hoping I can do it again next week!

Over the years, it seems like more and more western goodies have been making their way to South Korea. It’s kind of getting to the point where there’s no real reason for me to bring things from home anymore. Granted, there are still a large number of items that don’t exist here (more mac n cheese, please!), but it’s no longer impossible to find necessities and luxury items that I used to beg my friends and families from back home to send me.

The bad thing is that I now have to try a lot harder when purchasing gifts from home for my Korean friends and students. The promises of “cool American snacks” just doesn’t have the same draw when they can run out and get everything themselves.


ArtBox ♥ 아트박스 Korea’s #1 cute stationery shop!

Are you visiting Korea soon and looking for all sorts of cute stationery and misc treasures, but are not sure where to start or want something a step up from Daiso? Not to worry!  Korea has a very popular chain of shops that specializes in adorable goodies called ARTBOX that is a go-to place for any cute tidbits you may need!


Korea in Chiang Mai

 

You spend enough time in Asia as an Irishman and you give up expecting to find Irish stuff. You know you’ll stumble across something here or there, but at the best of times all you can find is a can of Guinness and a Westlife song. Chiang Mai, despite its large expat population and even larger tourist numbers was no better than Korea, or anywhere else I’ve been. I had hoped for half a day or so, but any hopes I had were soon dashed by the obvious.


Underground Selections

 

In the Myeong-dong Underground Shopping Mall, Seoul.


For Those Hard to Find Expat Food Items

Some stuff is just hard to get over here.  Like biscuit mix or enchilada sauce.  And other stuff is insanely expensive in Korea–like multivitamins.  Add to this the logistical (and potentially financial) nightmare of having stuff shipped from your home country, and your food situation can start looking pretty bleak, especially if you live in a small town that doesn’t have a lot of retail options.

If you’re not already using it, let me recommend iHerb.  This website has hands-down the best prices on vitamins if you’re an expat living in Korea.  They also have a wide array of health and beauty products and food items that can be tough to find in Korea.  We order stuff like quinoa, wheat bran, enchilada sauce (by Frontera–it’s amazing), and vitamins from them.  Shipping costs about $4.00 to anywhere in Korea, and delivery is fast.  If you’re stateside, the prices are still great on a  lot of items and shipping on stuff over $20 is free.  


AllMyKorea.com : English based online shopping site

I'd like to introduce english based online shopping site(Allmykorea.com) in Korea. 
 
Even though it is still going on updating products everyday, visitors can look around the items.
 
You also can get 2000 won free coupon now.
 
Any opinions will be always highly appreciated. Good day~~:)

Lets Go Shopping~ Gangnam Station

Today I have another favorite Korea shopping spot of mine that many visitors would not think to spend much time in~  Gangnam Station!  Yes that is right, the metro station in Gangnam has some amazing shopping for the newest trends on a very modest budget.  I find MANY of my 10,000 won treasures here at this station, which is funny since Gangnam is known for being “expensive” on the outside.


Flea Marketing

Myself and Herself have half a kind of a hobby these days. By these days I mean Autumn, as its kind of a seasonal thing. We go to flea markets and sell our *ahem* stuff.

The reason why we say it’s kind of a hobby is because we’ve only ever done it three times, and at the same time we only have so much to sell. But yeah, we’re well into it. We’ve a big black suitcase packed full of old but decent clothes, a few other bits a and pieces, as well as our mat for sitting on, and we head off and start selling our stuff. It’s good fun, social, and we usually come out with a few quid in our pocket.

I think it’s kind of a fad at the moment, because there seem to be flea markets for all sorts of occasions. There are a couple of charity ones, and of course there’s one in Hongdae, and for some reason they seem to be getting a lot of attention of late. Don’t ask me why. Probably because of Hongdae, but who am I to presume?


Dear Korea #096

Anyone who has lived in Korea in the past two years or so should probably know exactly what store and which song this comic is referencing. For those of you that don’t, click here and enjoy. Be warned. It’s terribly catchy.

While hearing this song for the entirety of my shopping trips was a little strange at first, I eventually grew to love it and even started looking forward to it. What can I say? It puts me in a great mood for no real reason. I’m pretty sure I’m not the only person who feels this way. I just know a number of friends and I were a little heartbroken when they changed the song over the past few years to something more generic and pop-friendly.

I suddenly want to go shopping for groceries I don’t need now…


Gay "Straight" Spots in Seoul

Color Me Rad Korea!

At the weekend we took part in a Color Me Rad run in Seoul. It was a lot of fun! The event was held in Seoul Olympic Sports Complex. As it was extremely busy there was not a chance to run, it was more of a fun walk but this was okay with me. At various points of the course colour tunnels were set up. The first colour was orange, then pink, blue and yellow. As you walked through a group of volunteers threw coloured powder all over you!  The atmosphere of the event was fantastic. Everybody was having a lot of fun and were very happy to be covered in so much colour! To participate in the race the sign up fee was 35,000 won. This included a t-shirt and a pair of sunglasses. There were also a lot of freebies to be had at the end of the race. Everybody got their own colour powder pouch(s), wet wipes and vitamin water(s).  It was a very messy experience but I am glad we did it!


How to Stretch Your Won and Save Money While Living in Seoul

 

Recently, I quit my job as an English teacher and decided to study Korean full-time as a university student.  I had forgotten what it was like to live without a steady income and it didn't take me long to realize that my habits of frivolous spending had to come to an end. For good.

You see, when you live in Seoul, especially if you're teaching English, it's easy to throw around money and not even realize you're spending it.  Between nights out bar hopping in Hongdae, dinners at upscale restaurants in Itaewon, daily morning coffee at Starbucks, and shopping dates on Garuso-gil, it's not difficult to blow half of one's salary in just a few weeks.  Of course, since most English teachers do not pay rent or car insurance or any other "grown up" bills that they would otherwise pay in their home countries, saving money isn't much of a challenge, either.


Love to Hate Korea: Costco

It’s no secret that Costco in Korea is the epitome of a modern hellhole designed to rip your soul out, divvy it up with a rusty and blunt axe, chew it, then spit it right back at you, so you you put it back inside, then turn around and do it all over again. This place steals so much attention and causes so much heartbreak and frustration, but let’s not forget that all it is is a bloody supermarket!

But why is the place just destined to constantly infuritate me? I blame people. Because, let’s face it, all the ills of the world are brought about by our fellow humans, and Costco in Korea is a perfect example of this.


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