Skip to Content

relax

Go ride a bike.

 


A Seoul Spring on the Han

Something about being near water is simply relaxing. When the weather finally agrees to reward Seoul, Korea with a mild and sunny day after a brutally long winter people tend to flock to the Han River. Here are 10 ways to enjoy the river in the coming months.

1

seoultower

photo credit: my cool friend James

1) Banpo Bridge


Jimjilbanging: It’s kind of like eating kimchi, but you’ve got to get naked.

 

ktfac
photo credit

Korea is lovingly known as The Land of Kimchi, but I argue the slogan could lose kimchi and replace it with jimjilbang and no one would throw a fit. Kimchi and jimjilbangs are both well-known elements of Korean culture. Jimjilbangs are large public bath houses (mostly gender-segregated) and can be found on almost every street in Korea. Some are more fancy than others, but most have a handful of hot baths, showers, saunas, massage tables, lockers, sleeping areas and social meeting spaces. Jimjilbangs are usually open 24 hours a day and many people visit them to bathe, relax and sleep. Most rooms, including the saunas, have special minerals, woods and stones to create a soothing sanctuary and provide elements of traditional Korean medicine. The Korean jimjilbang is a familiar and calming oasis for all Koreans. Each is a mini spa that caters to your every need. They are more prevalent than Starbucks shops and you can spend a day in one for the cost of a latte and a snack. They sound perfect, right?


Koh Samet: I wish you were here, or maybe not.

image

I have no intention of making you jealous, but I have to inform you that I am writing this blog post from a beach chair 4 feet from the water on the small island of Koh Samet in Thailand. It is late afternoon and the beach area in front of my resort (My bungalow is $20 a night!) is starting to clear out for the day. I personally think dusk is the best part of a beach day. The sky’s color is spectacular, the sun isn’t as intense as it was a few hours prior and I can finally tell by looking at my skin that yes, I in fact did manage to tan and not burn after hours of frolicking in the surf.


Relaxing in Busan and Other Pics


back to Bikram or how I will soon be able to calm down an angry Korean

A friend from college who spent two previous years in Korea quickly became my go-to source for random questions and concerns before my final decision to sign, stamp and send my teaching contract back to my recruiter. She planned to return home to the US shortly before my own departure date. I was lucky enough to meet up with her in Boston for a quick drink and a much needed pep talk that reassured me I was making the right decision by moving to Korea (“Korea!?” – all my friends/family at holiday gatherings).


12 Environmental Movies To Watch (while desk warming)

12 Environmental Movies To Watch 

1. Forks over Knives (2011) Director Lee Fulkerson

Forks over Knives examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the degenerative diseases that afflict modern society can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting animal-based and processed foods. The major storyline in the film traces the personal journeys of a pair of pioneering researchers, Dr. T. Colin Campbell and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn. Great inspiration and fascinating research.


Question from a reader: Relaxing and romantic getaways?

A reader writes in:

I'm wondering, besides Jeju, what would you consider the best place in Korea for a romantic overnight/weekend getaway? I'm talking relaxation, not like a "romantic" hike on Seoraksan. Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!

Jeju is definitely a romantic place, don't get me wrong. Until recently, the island was considered the honeymoon spot for Koreans, and a number of hotels offered honeymooner services that broke the ice for the new couple to, um, introduce themselves to each other. Unfortunately, the island is a plane ride away - not the easiest thing to spontaneously plan. The following suggestions, therefore, recognize that getting away needs to be reasonably easy.


Boryeong Mud Festival, 2007 (Relax)

Boryeong Mud Festival, 2007 (Relax)

One of the biggest and most famous of South Korean summer festivals, the Boryeong Mud Festival draws tens of thousands of Koreans and foreign expats alike to Deachon Beach on the Boryeong coast (about 2.5 hours away from Seoul).  The festival organizers tout the health and beauty benefits of the supposedly famous mud from this region ("rich in minerals!") as the reason why the event is so successful, but my impression of the event is that a lot of people just really, really like almost any excuse to play in the mud.

© 2007 Lee Gumienny

Syndicate content

Koreabridge - RSS Feeds
Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge - Facebook Group

Koreabridge - Googe+ Group