pose

12 Rules for Expat Life in Korea Contd.

Today has seen the Korean blogosphere dancing in the delights of this recent article of sorts on CNNgo.

Shocking stuff altogether.

Fortunately a few bloggers have jumped to protect Korea because Korea is such a wonderful perfect place that has never done anything wrong and shouldn’t be criticised for the realities its society presents. Grrrr. What I couldn’t get over was the general belief that this post was taken so seriously and the defence of Korea was so patriotic. So in defence of decency I will try to add my own flavour and sense of balance to this debate.

But first take a moment to read what has already been said:

Roboseyo: CNNgo Trolls Bloggers; 12 ACTUALLY useful tips for Expat life.

Re: 12 rules for expat life in Korea | Chris in South Korea – Travel and life in Korea.

12 Rules for Expats in Korea | David S. Wills.

Of course, no one here is right or wrong. It’s just … well… so what? As David S. Wills makes the point, anyone who reads the CNNgo post will – hopefully – realise that this is a little bit of jolly finger-pointing…at least I think that’s the point he made (I only had a few minutes to read so I read quickly, as in quicker than ‘scan’ reading).

Anyway, the balancing act courtesy of me. Drum rolls please!!!!

1. Learn to Drink Like a Fish – Yes, do! You’ll have a great time. Forget about how much Koreans drink – I don’t think most of these other bloggers have ever seen how much English teachers in Korea drink! And, on that point, I am assuming that the people who move to Korea are adults and can make their own decision as to how much they drink. My personal preference is to drink as much as I can and learn from your mistakes (I always try to smile and say please and thank you). I am assuming you, the reader, have strong enough self esteem to make your own decisions. 


RECENT! Take a picture, it’ll last longer

It’s not all that long ago that a popular stereotype of East Asians was their love of taking photographs.

In 80s films it was quite common to have them depicted as trigger-happy photographers. Typically, a camera would either be hung around the photographer’s neck or firmly attached to the eye as they rapidly took pictures. As action in the film unfolded, they were pictured never far behind – manically capturing images of fallen victims left lying in the protagonist’s wake.

I realise now that in Korea this stereotype is not far from the truth.


Sights in Seoul

You'll never know what you'll see in Seoul.  Yeah, there's the temples, parks, museums, DMZ and other famous sights.  I'm talking about the really cool stuff.  Like this:



Taejongdae

Taejongdae is another beautiful sight in Busan.  It's on the southernmost tip of Yeongdo, or Yeong Island.  Some westerners say "Yeongdo Island."  This is incorrect because "do" means "island."  You don't want to say "Yeong Island Island."  That would just be goofy goofy.

The place is named after King Taejong who used to frequent the island.  He ruled during the Silla kingdom.  I'm guessing he would've been a fan of Green Arrow and Robin Hood since he spent time practicing archery while on the island.

There's an amusement park nearby where you can amuse yourself.  The "John Wayne" restaurant is nearby too.  It's a really good Korean barbecue restaurant that we take our Navy Reserves to sometimes.  They'll even drive a bus out and pick up your group.  The view from the restaurant is really nice during the day.  At night, you're just staring at a bunch of lights.

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