philosophy

The 99% Theory

IMG_2567Why is it that the most defining experiences of our lives are often the most difficult to describe? Just when we need the “right words” the most, suddenly we have none. Try as we might, it seems impossible to string together the most accurate series of adjectives, nouns and verbs.

Does our desperation to paint the perfect picture override our cognitive abilities and cause our brains to force-quit? Should we have been paying closer attention in the moment in order to have a better memory of it later? Or, is it because there are some things in this world that can only be seen, heard, tasted, smelled, touched and felt by means of personal experience, and there is no substitute for the real thing?


From Sri Lanka, with Love

by Das Messer

 

AIRPORT GUYairport_waiting

The sanctity of Travel lies in its tendency to command your respect as you set out to peer voyeuristically into other human lives. Navel-gazing at a time like this is over-indulgent and simply uncouth: There’s a time for raw vulnerability, but this isn’t it. Chin up, shoulders back, deep breath: Youre on your own now, Das. Lock it down.

***


Superficiality (The Photo With The Résumé)

I remember a passage in Plato’s Symposium, which I don’t have with me and which I don’t really have the patience to find, and it was a typically Platonic, gnostic sort of passage regarding levels of intelligence and wisdom: the lover of souls and minds is superior to the lover of bodies, probably because the soul is immortal, godlike, and perfect, while the body is made of temporary stuff, a Protean Ship of Theseus, constantly changing, impossible to define, and soon reduced to dirt “stopping up a bunghole.” One of my more sensuous friends complained about Plato’s disdain of the physical world and his seemingly Buddha-like adoration of the mystical and the unseen, but at least in the case of Socrates we can tell rather easily why it’s important to focus more on the mind than the body:


Individuality

It’s come to the point where I can predict the answers to most of the questions I ask in my conversation classes. “What’s your favorite kind of music?” “Balla-duh.” “Who’s your favorite actor?” “Won Bin.” “Why do you like him?” “He is so sexy.” “What do you like doing?” “I like sleeping.” “What are your plans for this weekend?” “I’m going to a cafe to talk with my friends.” “What’s your favorite kind of coffee?” “I like Americano.” “Why?” “It is very delicious.” And on and on.


Boke-Gote, Sakura, Cherry Blossoms

One of my acquaintances told me a while back that he had gone all the way to Jinae, a rather out-of-the-way place, to take part in that city’s Cherry Blossom Festival. I had heard about this festival several times and wondered if, unlike most of the savagely mediocre events in Korea, it was worth attending. “No!“, he replied, the cherry blossoms in Jinae were just as interesting as anywhere else.


Going Bonkers

Ilya Repin's depiction of Gogol burning the manuscript to the sequel of Dead Souls, which was, apparently, not very good.


From Comics To Chinese To Ancient Egyptian To Korea And Back Again


My Dad's Book Launch: A New, Objective, Pro-Objectivity Normative Theory

Since as long as I can remember, my Dad has always been typing away at something. We used to own an Atari, long before computers became cool. It was a pioneer machine, before black and white, with brown coloured text on a black background. And it took real floppy disks, the 5.25 inch ones that you could muck up with a fridge magnet.

All of that typing on ancient computing equipment has cumulatively paid off in the form of a book he has just published, called 'A New, Objective, Pro-Objectivity Normative Theory.'

Busan Socrates Cafe

Date: 
Repeats every week until Mon Dec 31 2012 .
Sunday, January 15, 2012 - 11:00

This group is for those Busanites who are looking for a physically and mentally healthy life.

We generate a list of questions and vote on one question to discuss every time. The questions are created from our own life experiences and thinking.

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=4766189585&ref=ts#!/group.php?gid=4766189585

Socrates Cafe Webcast: Blinded by Our Own Culture


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