Out of Busan

High 1 Ski Resort

 

High 1

Photo by Nicole Rafael

We all know that the Korean term of “famous” just means “popular”. High 1 is thought to be the most “famous” resort in Korea, and by that they mean busy.

The mountain is located in the Gangwon-do province due north of Busan this resort is just the thing to get the more advanced mountain goers buzzing.

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Overnight in Siloam Jimjilbang-Seoul

 

BY Emma O’Flynn

Busan!  Great city, all the trappings, fun place, right on the ocean, fabulous!  And there’s even an airport!  Our very own Gimhae airport with flights to…hum…not that many places actually.  And hold on, the prices are craaaazzzzy!  We all have had, or will have, that experience of trying to depart dear Korea for vacation or otherwise.  And let’s be honest, the selection of flights from Gimhae is ‘lacking’ (unless of course, you wanna spend 36 hours in transit at various locations across the globe).  So you’re forced to fly from Incheon, and your flight departs at stupid o’clock in the morning, or returns stupidly late at night…watcha gonna do?  Well my fellow waygooks, there is a convenient and cost effective solution!


Trains and Trains

 

by Melissa Tait

So, trains are a great way to travel. Just rock up, no security, as much luggage as you want and a gentle swaying motion as you travel. And I have a ‘thing’ for trains. I like to keep an eye on them…make sure they are running to schedule…maybe even ‘spot’ some interesting ones..and my little interest got a severe workout when I lived across from a train station in Busan. As a Busanite I’m sure you’re aware of the KTX Busan to Seoul express, 300 kms/hour, 2 hours 18 minutes. But here are a few insights which might help you use the train for shorter trips or save a few won.

Types of Trains


A Weekend in Gwangju

BY MICHAEL FRAIMAN

It seems every city in Korea has a ‘thing’—Pyongchang has skiing, Danyang has caves, Chongdo has bullfighting. City tourism officials tend to take these ‘things’ and clutch onto them with a vice grip; one sees billboards for the tea fields as soon as one enters Boseong, for example, or can’t help but be struck by the number of whale statues around Ulsan. Gwangju’s ‘thing’ is democracy—probably a nobler ‘thing’ than whales or tea—and no matter where you are in the city, they don’t let you forget it.


A Weekend in Southern Gangwon-do

 

BY MICHAEL FRAIMAN

There is no particular reason that Korea’s rural northeast is often overlooked. Rather, there are several small reasons: it’s out of the way from any significant city, the bullet train doesn’t run there, winter brings heavier snowfalls than it does most the rest of the country, and it’s not proximally close to either China or Japan, which could historically account for its underdevelopment. It’s the sort of area one would probably read a book through on a bus ride, though if you glanced out the window you’d notice mostly flat, traditional Korean roofs hovering over a sea of cabbage farms and some of the best mountain views in the country, widely unobscured by condominiums.


Mudfest – Boryeong’s Dacheon Beach

BY MELISSA TAIT

Mudfest in Boryeong, South Korea

(The Mudfest is in JULY this year from 07.14.2012 ~ 07.24.2012)

The Boryeong Mud Festival is one of the things that most people know South Korea for. “Isn’t there some crazy festival where everyone is covered in mud?” Well, yes, and it’s awesome.


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