nuclear

Is it Safe in South Korea on worldirish.com

I was asked to write an op-ed by worldirish.com, a news website from Ireland which connects stories and activities of Irish interest from around the world, about the ongoing crisis between South Korea and North Korea. Most importantly, they were interested in the situation here and the international media’s response.

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The line which divides North and South Korea at Panmounjeom.

While I believe I carry the same opinion as many expats, and even experts here, my biggest concern at the moment is that I am not wrong about what I wrote. I wouldn’t be alone in this regard.

Here’s the article:


Nuclear Free World Festival Busan 2012

March 11th marked 1 year since the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Tragedy.  As a sign of support and camaraderie with the Japanese people who are still rebuilding their lives, the people of Busan took to the streets on Saturday to protest the use of nuclear energy on their shores.


A New Vocabulary

A new vocabulary is gradually being learned, a vocabulary of crisis. A very particular crisis. The tsunami and earthquake in Japan shattered the reactors of the Fukishima-Daichi nuclear power plant north of Tokyo on the country’s east coast. If you haven’t heard about this then perhaps you should change the channel on the television or read a different newspaper. With the damage to the plant came a universal threat to everyone, especially those closest to the power plant. Radiation, a slow and silent killer, has been seeping into the air and Pacific Ocean.

The fire at the Fukishima Daichi nuclear power plant which is contributing to the radiation leakage

 


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