Life in Korea

How to Say ‘OK’ in Korean

As you know, the word ‘OK’ has several different meanings in English.

It can mean ‘yes’.

It can also mean that something is sufficient or ‘not bad’.

Likewise, when looking at how to say ‘OK’ in Korean, there are several different words that we can use depending on the type of ‘OK’ that we want to say.

Are you ‘OK’ to jump right into it? Here we go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘OK’ as in ‘yes’

If you want to say OK as in ‘yes’, then you can simply use the Korean word for yes. You can also use the word ‘to know’.

To show how these are used, you can read the conversation below. In the conversation, ‘A’ is giving a direction and ‘B’ is saying ‘OK’ two different ways.

 


McDonald’s Vs. Korean Street Food Vendor Churros

Korean street food is a blanket term for a large variety of eats. Of the sweet items that can be purchased from a street vendor is a popular choice that isn’t even Korean. It’s churros.

I see many stands selling churros and also many store fronts that sell them with different fillings like peanut butter, a general cream filling they call “milk”, and chocolate.

Here’s the thing about popular food. If it’s out there, McDonald’s is going to try and McMass produce it. So goes it with churros. There I was getting my McDs fix and a digital image of churros pops onto the screen.

I figured they probably taste pretty good, but instead of just letting the thought pass I decided to try them out. I also wanted to see how they compared to the street vendor versions of the same snack.


How to Say ‘You’re Welcome’ in Korean

Previously, we learned how to say ‘thank you’ in Korean. After somebody says thank you, it’s good manners to reply with a ‘you’re welcome’.

Let’s learn how to say ‘you’re welcome’ in Korean!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

Formal ‘You’re Welcome’ in Korean

1. 천만에요 (cheon-man-eh-yo)

This word comes from the number 천만 meaning ‘ten-million’ in English. The logic behind this expression is that the thing you are being thanked for doing is so small that even if you did it ten-million times the other person still wouldn’t need to thank you.


How to Say ‘I’m Hungry’ in Korean

Is your stomach grumbling? Did you skip lunch?

Then you’re going to need to know how to say ‘I’m hungry’ in Korean!

Let’s jump right into it.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘Hungry’ vs. ‘Full’ in Korean

When talking about whether you are hungry or not, two different adjectives are used.

In front of each adjective is the word 배 (bae), which means ‘stomach’. To say that you are hungry, you add the adjective 고프다 (go-puh-da) to make 배 고프다.

Strictly speaking, the particle ‘가’ (ga) should come after ‘배’ to make ‘배가 고프다’. However, when speaking, people drop this particle.


Top 10 Korean Jokes

Ready for some laughs?

Here’s a list of some of the top Korean jokes. Most of them are a mix of Korean and English, so it helps if you know at least some basic Korean.

We’ve also tossed in some pictures to help you remember these Korean jokes more easily.

If you can’t read Hangul (the Korean Alphabet) yet, you can download a free guide here and be reading in about 60 minutes.

Let the games begin!

Caution: Don’t drink milk while reading these jokes. There’s a high chance that milk will shoot out from your nose from laughter!

Korean Joke #1Korean joke beans

Q: What is the biggest bean in the world?


How to Say ‘I Don’t Know’ in Korean

We all like to know the answer to questions. It makes us feel helpful, knowledgeable, and in control.

However, there will always be times when we don’t know the answer to something. In those cases, it’s best to tell the truth and say, “I don’t know”. The other person will respect your honesty!

Today, we will explain how to say, “I don’t know” in Korean.

On your marks, get set, go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

Root Verb for ‘I Don’t Know’

There are two verbs we’re going to compare today. They are opposites: One is quite knowledgeable, and one is a bit ignorant.

Ready to meet them?


How to Say ‘Goodnight’ in Korean

Let’s talk about how to say “goodnight’ in Korean.

Although several phrases will be taught in this lesson, it may be best to pick one formal and one less formal expression and practice trying to use those expressions as much as possible.

In addition to knowing how to say ‘goodnight’, you may wish to use the expression ‘see you tomorrow’ (내일 봐요 – nae-il bwa-yo) in certain situations too.

Here we go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

Formal ‘Goodnight’ in Korean

1. 안녕히 주무세요 (an-nyeong-hee joo-moo-se-yo)

If you have studied ‘How to Say Goodbye in Korean‘, then you will be aware of the word 안녕히 (peacefully) already.


How to Say ‘I’m Sorry’ in Korean

When living in a foreign country, you are bound to make cultural faux pas, mistakes, and other general errors.

Embarrassing!

Therefore, learning how to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Korean will be very useful to know if you plan on spending any amount of time in Korea.

Not only will it help you smooth out mistakes and misunderstandings, but it will also show what great manners Mom taught you.

Here we go!

*NOTE: Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


5 Korean Convenience Store Ice Cream Bars

Convenience stores in Korea are not any different than back home. They are filled with countless items, mostly food, and are on every corner. The food mainly consists of snacks ranging from chips to ramyeon noodles. Also inside is a freezer full of ice cream treats. It’s not too difficult to get the late night munchies and I’ve had my share of the snacks at many of these stores.

The big chains in Korea are 7-Eleven, Family Mart, CU, and GS25. I took a few days to give you a sample of five different Korean ice cream cones and bars that can be found in these stores, but there are MANY more.

Here is a video where I chow down on some awesome Korean ice cream cone snacks.


How to Say ‘Goodbye’ in Korean

If you’ve already figured out to how to say ‘hello’ in Korean, then you’re read to add the next important phrase to the mix.

Today, we’ll show you how to say ‘goodbye’ in Korean.

There is more than one way of saying ‘goodbye’. You should use a different ‘goodbye’ phrase depending on whether you are the person going or the person staying.

Let’s get to it!

*NOTE: Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

Standard ‘Goodbye’ in Korean

1. 안녕히 가세요 (annyeonghi kaseyo)

If the other person is leaving, then you should say 안녕히 가세요 ‘annyeonghi kaseyo’. Let’s break it down!


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