learn korean

How to Say ‘Honey’ in Korean

If you have a Korean boyfriend or girlfriend, then you are going to want to call them by a special name. Terms of endearment can help you feel closer and show your feelings. In English, people often call their partners ‘honey’.

Today, we are going to learn how to say ‘honey’ in Korean. Learn the word for ‘honey’ and help make your relationship even better!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 


How to Say ‘What Are You Doing?’ in Korean

It is always good to know a few conversation starters when learning a new language. Knowing how to say ‘What are you doing?’ in Korean will help you start conversations. Not only will this help you get more practice at speaking Korean, but it will also help you strengthen your friendships with Koreans!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘What Are You doing?’ in Korean

Using ‘What’ and ‘To Do’

There are lots of different ways to say ‘What are you doing?’ in Korean, but they all have two things in common. The first is the use of the word 뭐 (mwo), which means ‘what’. The second thing that they have in common is the use of the verb 하다 (hada), which means ‘to do’.


Top 5 Korean Language Exchange Sites (and why you should be using them!)

Committing to learning a new language is one of the best ways to broaden the horizons that make up your own day to day life. In becoming familiar with a new language, you’re also laying the groundwork for being able to watch movies, listen to music, and read books that were previously inaccessible.

If you’re anything like me, though, you’re not a big fan of the way learning a language used to be done – long hours in front of a textbook, boring writing exercises, and little to no real world application of the language.

Korean language exchanges are an amazing tool for anyone interested in learning to Korean language – they allow you to practice what you’ve learned in a friendly, casual, and educational environment that adds a fun new element to the learning process.


How to Say ‘No’ in Korean

In the movie Mr Bean’s Holiday, Mr Bean travels to France but only knows the French word for ‘yes’. His inability to say ‘no’ causes all sorts of mishaps. To make sure that your stay in Korea doesn’t end up like Mr. Bean’s trip to France, make sure you know how to say ‘no’ in Korean!

Like the word ‘yes’, there are ways of saying ‘no’ without using the actual word for ‘no’. Read the bonus section at the end of this article to learn some of these ways of saying ‘no’.

Here we go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 


How to Say ‘What Is Your Name’ in Korean

When you first meet someone, it’s important to be able to ask what is your name in Korean. It’s good manners!

This is especially true in Korea! There are a few reasons for this:

1. You may be unfamiliar with Korean names

2. Koreans don’t always say their name up front

3. Korean is a hierarchial language, so you need to know how to address the person you’re meeting

When making Korean friends, you’ll want to know how to say what is your name in Korean. We’ll show you how!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

Formal ‘What is Your Name’ in Korean

1. 성함이 어떻게 되세요? (seonghame eoddeoke dwesaeyo?)


How to Say ‘Nice to Meet You’ in Korean

First impressions are so important. That first meeting can often shape other people’s perspective of your forever!

Let’s make sure that they have a great impression of you by learning to say ‘nice to meet you’ in Korean. This small phrase will not only show that you have great manners, but also that you enjoyed meeting your new friend, acquaintance, or potential future romantic partner.

Below, we’ll show you the various ways to say ‘nice to meet you’ in Korean.


Christmas in Korea: What Is It Like?

Christmas in Korea is very different from Christmas in North America or Europe. There are some superficial similarities, such as Christmas decorations in shop windows, but look beyond that and the differences become very apparent.

The good news is that Christmas is a national holiday in Korea. That means that if you work in an office, school, or factory that isn’t owned by the local scrooge, then you are likely to have the day off.

Unlike many Asian countries, a large proportion of Koreans are Christian, which explains why the day is a national holiday. It also means that there are special Christmas services in churches around the country.

However, Christmas isn’t one of Korea’s big traditional holidays like Seollal or Chuseok, so there isn’t a mad rush of everybody trying to make it back to his or her hometown for Christmas.


Learn Korean With Star Wars Korean Movie Titles

Hey Korean movie buffs, today we’re going to learn Korean by studying the Star Wars Korean movie titles.

With the recent release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, everybody everywhere is talking about Star Wars, and we believe you should never miss an opportunity to study Korean when you can!

When foreign movie titles are translated into Korean, sometimes they keep their name and are written using the Korean pronunciation of the English title. However, sometimes the titles are translated into Korean – and the Star Wars movies are a bit of both!

Each Star Wars Korean movie title begins with 스타워즈 (Star Wars) plus the episode (에피소드) number. As you can see, these words are just the English words written in Korean and your only task is pronouncing them like a Korean!


Learn Korean With Kpop: Top 19 Psy ‘Daddy’ Lyrics

Want to study Korean and listen to a catchy Kpop tune at the same time?

Well, today is your lucky day! We’re back with another instalment of “learn Korean with Kpop” and today we’re going to break down the top 19 lyrics from Psy’s new song, “Daddy.”


How to Write Korean New Year’s Resolutions

Happy New Year, or 새해복 많이 받으세요 (that’s how we say Happy New Year in Korean)!

Sure, the end of the year is a great for partying, drinking and having fun with out families and friends. But each new year brings its own challenges and personal goals, and it’s that time of year to ready ourselves for self-improvement! That’s right, now that the holiday season is behind us, it’s time to pledge how we plan to better ourselves and set our New Year’s resolutions – in Korean!

So get ready to sit back, evaluate what you have done during the past year and what you plan to change in the year to come.


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