language

The Word of the Wind by Mah Jonggi

Translated by Chae-Pyong Song and Anne Rashid

Photography by Shawn Malone

Photography by Shawn Malone

The Word of the Wind by Mah Jonggi (1939-)

After all of us leave,
if my spirit passes by you,
don’t think even for a moment it is
the wind that sways the spring boughs.
Today I will plant a flower
on a corner of the shadow
where I got to know you;
when the flower grows to bloom,
all the distress that stemmed from our acquaintance
will turn into petals and fly away.


The Spain Culture Function! 스페인문화원 송년행사

 


Queer Links from the Week

Who's pretending to be a boy?
Korean Gender Care- Queer Corner: Violence in a Label- - 마짜, 때짜, 올

Mostly Harmless

When I was tentatively asked to move from working part-time to full-time at Busan International Foreign School back in February – a job I finally began last week – I understood that as part of this my son could be educated at the school during the duration of my contract, which my wife and I had decided would be a good idea since we had become concerned at his interactions with other children when he met them. Because of this, we didn't search for a place in a Korean nursery for him, but a couple of days after I signed the contract we found out he was 10 days too young to qualify for a place. The moral of the story perhaps, is to always check the small print yourself.

A Korean Piggy to Inspire Me

 


A Week in Photos #4

 


Only in the Classroom


Dreaming in Korean

 


Tea for the Day

Oh living in a foreign country where you don't understand the language fully. 
Yesterday I had two of my awesome Korean friends over to come see my new apartment, and to spend some time together.  Since I still don't have much to eat or drink stocked up in my kitchen I ran down to the convenience store for some snacks and some tea.  They didn't have any black tea, just green and barley, but I prefer black so I was looking for something comparable. 

The Cúpla Focail: words, translation, creation.

I’m no linguist, but I love language. I love how language has formed into a universal description of a particular aspect of the world that surrounds you. It’s amazing. But, I’m no expert, and I couldn’t sit here and describe why this is the case and how it happened. I don’t understand it well enough. In fact the only language I could arguably claim to understand is English. And even that level of understanding is rudimentary. But, a bit like watching science happen, this is why I love language.

Just seeing language happen and seeing it function, and then having particular aspects explained, especially things like idioms, really wets my pants with excitement. Irish people, for reasons I won’t go into now, are known for their use of language, be it the gift of the gab, poetry, or basically telling some poor misfortunate what you think of them in sixteen different ways, and none of them being either pleasant, complimentary, or suitable for young ears.


Syndicate content
 

Koreabridge - RSS Feeds 
Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge - Facebook Group