Korean Media

The Closed-Page–The Provincial Policies of Korean Dailies

By Iwazaru

One of the reasons we started 3WM (and DDD before it) was to provide a platform for writers whose work the traditional dailies usually rejected. During this most recent hiatus, through spring and summer of 2015, I have been advising high school students on researching, writing, and submitting op-eds to Korean dailies with the hope of getting them published. The submission process proved confounding and frustrating from the beginning. First, none of the students got any reply from the editors at the Korea Times, the Korea Herald or the JoongAng Daily. Not a “thank you for your submission” or a “at this time we cannot find a place for your work.” Nothing.


Serious issues spoiled by incoherent ranting style

Child Abuse camp as advertised on the Democratic United Party blog and protected by corrupt police soon to be exposed

By [name redacted] and translated by Surprisesaplenty

My ‘translated by’ claim above is snarky, but I am starting from the man’s Facebook claims and following other links.  His writing is … challenging.

A sample from various locations (1,2) on Facebook (these are from large groups on Facebook so I don’t think they are private utterances.  The latter link is to “Every Expat inKorea” which sounds like it should be considered a public space):


What obscene acts is this journalist doing to keep his job?

Jake Nho has an article up at the Korea Times and it is a doozy, even for the Times.

Here is part of his bio: He has written numerous articles on various environmental issues for over 20 years.

It appears the article is one of a series (currently up to 16) on “Earth in Danger”.  Now I see I need to read more of these articles – for entertainment value if nothing else.

Now, lets look at a few excerpts from the article with my commentary added.  I have quoted Nho in Orange and my research in blue.  I hope it is not too garish and felt the variety of color would better differentiate the different voices.

His article is titled: “Does the Earth really need our protection?” and he starts by discussing the alarm over damage to the ozone layer:


Libel in Korea and elsewhere

Below is a somewhat lengthier version of an article I wrote for Busan Haps.  One of the Haps’ editors asked for it and told me I could also put it on my blog.  I handed it in just over a week ago and told him I would put it up on my blog on Sept 5.  Here we are but I don’t see it there.
The article was supposed to be around 800 words but, after vigorous cutting  came out at about a thousand.  One thing I did not include in the article was my opinion of what should or could be done.  I don’t like Korea’s libel laws – or the UKs, etc- but the article was mostly a review of problems without any solutions offered.
Let me discuss my conclusions first for people who came here from the Busan Haps article  Below that is the article itself.

blogs and traditional media; In Korea, neither has legitimacy

The local English Newspapers are excitedly reporting on ‘babyrose’, a Korean blogger who turned out to be a shill for an ozone-producing sterilizing device.

The problem is, Korean libel laws prevent anyone from reporting on things in a way that negatively affects a person or company.  That negative effect is usually measured financially, but might be considered in other ways (IANAL*).

So, it is mostly legal to report or blog about something you like, but not to warn people away from it.

Now, I’ve told you generally what the issue is.  Let’s look at what the newspapers have to say:

Joongang:


BoA (보아) – Girls on Top (걸스온탑): Lyrics, Translation, & Explanation

(Source)

Why open a post about a song with a mascara ad? Good question, to which the simple answer would be that Girls on Top came out nearly 6 years ago, and high-quality, eye-catching images of BoA from back then are hard to find. But, serendipitously, it also helps focus our minds on just how unconventional the song is.


Pin-up Girls as Role Models?

(Sources: left, right)

The first fruits of my lecture last weekend!


With Great Legs Comes Great Responsibility?

(Source: Seoul Focus, May 17 2011, p. 13)

Mirror Mirror by 4Minute (포미닛): Lyrics, Translation, and Explanation

(Source, all screenshots)

For many Korean girl groups, debuting a new song on a music program seems to follow a set script these days:


Korean Sociological Image: Thin Caucasian Girls Gone Wild?

(Source: Ads of the World)

Sigh. I beg to differ on Cup Noodles being a “diet food” made for “people who want to get themselves into shape”, but it’s no great surprise that that’s how they’re being marketed in Korea.


Syndicate content
 

Koreabridge - RSS Feeds 
Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge - Facebook Group