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Hanok Hideaways


The creak of old wooden floors.  The sliding of beautifully crafted doors.  The upward curves of tiled roofs and the enchanting calm of courtyards.  Hanoks, or traditional Korean houses, are delightful dwellings where those who enter them can't help but be hypnotized by their charm.  Constructed in accordance with nature and geographical location, hanoks were the preferred type of home by Koreans until last century.  Due to population growth and lack of space, Koreans in bigger cities have since been forced to build upward and live in unattractive cement structures.  This is especially true in Seoul, where residents prefer more modern homes with larger living spaces.  Still, there are a few places in the Korean capital where visitors can bask in the beauty of the hanok.


Christmas in Korea

This year was the second time I spent the holiday season in Korea, and how I wish I had spent it in the Philippines instead. There’s nothing like Christmas in a country that celebrates the LONGEST Christmas (and New Year).


Not-So-Normal-Norms, Part V

 

 In the latest segment of "Not-So-Normal Norms", I talk about letterman jackets, MTs, condiments, the excessive wearing of high heels, and the lack of gray hair in Korea.   As usual, I must note that this post has been written to point out Korean cultural norms that are different from those in my home country, America, and the West in general.  My comments are in no way intended to degrade Korean culture or Korean people.
 


Cosplay and Cartoons at Seoul Comic World


There's no doubt that cartoons are loved all around the world.  Comic books and animated television shows conjure up images of childhood, Saturday mornings, and spent allowances.  Yet, there are few places where cartoon culture is as prevalent as Eastern Asia.  In Korea, comics are taken to a whole new extreme.


Looking Back on 2012 Through The Seasons

This last year has been filled with ups and downs, adventures and good times with friends. When 2012 started I was mostly focused on the upcoming school year moving to 2nd grade. I was busy with planning lessons and considering the school year ahead as a team leader. At the same time I was single and getting accustomed to this new life style. As 2012 grew on I learned some important lessons and some good times.

I am going to take you through the last full year I experienced here in Korea, and I will do this by showcasing it through the seasons.


Spring:
In February I went back home to Florida and visited family. I was able to get away from the cold of Seoul and enter the warmth and sunny skies of South Florida.

Braved The Cold and Celebrated Christmas


For Christmas I braved the freezing temperatures and ventured into the Jongno area for some Middle-Eastern food and cupcakes. I met a like minded friend who wanted to enjoy this holiday season and we had a jolly good time.

We picked up cupcakes from Goodovening near Euljiro-1 station.

The Couches

There are two of them in my apartment, and several months ago they were both bought together for around $350 from a friend who claimed to have gotten them from the American Embassy in Seoul, on top of that claiming that they were made in America, which is supposedly famous for producing good couches. I don’t know anything about those assertions, but I do know that the couches are comfortable. I know this because for many years I lived in a house with couches of such staggeringly powerful embraces that after five minutes they would put to sleep guests who were unused to their charms, and so I have some knowledge of what constitutes comfort. After three years of sitting on hard Korean floors and in hard Korean chairs without any neck support, after aching and groaning and leaning forward on hard tables to rest like a convict, my neck throbbing with pain even in the tackiest cafes, these two new couches came as a revelation.


Korean University Life published on Korea Blog

Student cheer team at the University festival

Korea's Future Without Me


The recent Korean Presidential election reminded me that this country's politics and future is going to roll on without me next year. I am surprised and proud of Korea for electing a woman President, but I know that it doesn't necessarily mean more rights for women in this country. However, with the figures for the number of people who voted this election I can see that people care about their country's future and want changes to come.

Top Korean Dramas for the year 2012

 

Originally published on The Korea Guide


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