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An Overview of Classical Chinese Poetry of Korean Independence Activists

Taegukgi

Introduction


An Overview of Classical Chinese Poetry of Korean Independence Activists

Taegukgi

Summary

  • Many Koreans today believe that Classical Chinese (漢文, 한문) is foreign and “un-Korean.”
  • To overcome this misconception, I have found it very helpful to point out that Korean independence activists frequently wrote in the language.

Introduction


If you build it, they will come.

 

Hey guys,

The purpose of this website is to connect all the kyopos around the globe.  I want the Kyopos in the world to be aware that there are other Kyopos in other countries.  I would like to connect them to you !

I’ve been searching here and there all over the net world and have been connecting with other kyopos.

I’m not posting anything and everything I research but I have attached a link for Russians Koreans and one for Korean Americans on my home page that I thought might interest people.

There will be changes happening little by little so I am letting you know in advance.  If you’ve ever played Super Mario Brothers you’ve probably seen something like this:

Super-Mario-World-Map


Kimhae Kim Family Clan Jokbo – 1754 Edition – Preface I

The following is the first preface from the 1754 Edition of the Kimhae Kim Family Clan Jokbo (族譜, 족보), or the Gapsulbo (甲戌譜, 갑술보). The translation is from the original Classical Chinese (漢文, 한문) and checked with the Korean translation. The few points of disagreement between the English and the Korean translation is where this blogger thought that the Korean translation was a loose translation of the original.

甲戌譜序一
갑술보서일


Book Review – 알기쉬운 한문해석법 – 심재동

알기쉬운 한문해석법

알기쉬운 한문해석법 – 심재동 저
An Easy to Learn Method of Interpreting Classical Chinese – By Shim Jaedong

Bibliographic Summary


On Hangul Supremacy & Exclusivity – On “Pure” Korean Words

Hangul Expo

On “Pure” Korean Words and Korean Linguistic Purism

Claim: Koreans do not need to rely on Sino-Korean words. The Korean language can be “purified” of Sino-Korean words.


On Hangul Supremacy & Exclusivity – Severe Limitations to Vocabulary

Gwanghwamun Protesters

Hangul exclusivity protesters at Gwanghwamun (光化門, 광화문).

This is the sixth post in a series on Hangul Supremacy and Hangul Exclusivity. Hangul Supremacy (–優秀主義, 한글우수주의) is the widespread belief that Hangul is superior. Hangul Exclusivity (–專用, 한글전용) is closely related and refers to writing exclusively in Hangul.

Severe Limitations to Vocabulary with Hangul Exclusivity

Claim: Hangul exclusivity has made reading and understanding Korean easier.


On Hangul Supremacy & Exclusivity – Hangul and Literacy Rates

World Literacy Rates

Literacy rates of countries around the world. Note that many countries have literacy rates in the same range as Korea’s.

This is the fifth post in a series on Hangul Supremacy and Hangul Exclusivity. Hangul Supremacy (–優秀主義, 한글우수주의) is the widespread belief that Hangul is superior. Hangul Exclusivity (–專用, 한글전용) is closely related and refers to writing exclusively in Hangul.

Hangul and Literacy Rates


Announcement – The Classical Chinese Poetry of Korean Independence Activists

Daehan Dokrip

One way to view Hangul supremacy and exclusivity is that it is an expression of insecurity about Koreans have about their identity as Koreans. There is an tendency among Koreans to try to distinguish themselves and their identity from their neighbors. Consequently, many Koreans, especially Hangul exclusivity advocates, go to great depths performing mental gymnastics to disparage and disassociate Hanja from Korean culture — and replace it with something newfangled to stand in as if it were “traditional.” However, this was not always the case. Previous generations of Koreans, proud of their Korean identity and patrimony, embraced the script.


On Hangul Supremacy & Exclusivity – Promotion of Hangul by the Japanese Colonial Administration

Arirang

Arirang (아리랑) in a Japanese textbook used during the colonial administration of Korea. Note that some words on the right could have been written in Hanja.

Promotion of Hangul by the Japanese Colonial Administration

Claim: The Japanese attempted to stamp out the Korean language and Hangul by imposing Hanja-Hangul Mixed Script (國漢文混用, 국한문혼용) and the Japanese language.


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