Skip to Content

Gimhae

95. – 99. Mango Six, Cofy Plz, I *Heart* Coffee, Coffeemama, Dal.Komm Coffee

95. Mangosix Coffee & Dessert (Gimhae)

95. Mango Six Coffee & Dessert (Gimhae) I first saw this somewhere in Gwangan, Busan, about two years ago. They had a self-serve froyo station, akin to those that were exploding all over the U.S. a few years ago. I wonder if that’s still a thing over there.


88. – 94. Fall In Coffee, Yoger Presso, ToPresso, Cafe Droptop, Coffine Gurunaru, Alice2046, good & goods

I have heard stories, anecdotal mostly, how even the scent of coffee can cause one great need to have a poo. Does this happen to you? Because, I also read recently that one of the sneaky causes of constipation can be drinking too much coffee.

Here are some coffee shops in Korea that have English that may raise an eyebrow or two, causing several heads to be scratched in the process.


87. Lemon Tree Cafe (Random Weekly Review)

As a red-blooded American, I have occasionally been guilty of thinking the world revolves around the U.S.A. Go ahead, call me an Imperialist Asshole. I try to remind myself it’s not whenever this happens. But, in Korea, with American-style English being crammed in the brain of every child, a McDonald’s on every corner, and usually a Starbucks right next to it, it’s not always easy.

The popular music scene, however, is often a great way to remember. K-Pop dominates. Occasionally, too, a song from elsewhere in the world catches ROK ears, a song that barely registers, if at all, in the United States.

In the mid-1990s, that song was “Lemon Tree.”


83. – 86. Aco Coffee, Caffe Tiamo, Caffe Primo, Coffee of Dream

Do you know what I drank this morning? Coffee. And then, I had coffee.

83. Aco-Coffee (Gimhae). Can anyone tell me what the

83. Aco-Coffee (Gimhae). Can anyone tell me what the “aco” in Aco-Coffee is supposed to mean?


77. – 82. Cafe Icebean, Essentia, Pasta Farm, Eat, Coffee & Mobile, Take Out Coffee

Here are some more “not just coffee” entries. Whether it’s a bakery, dessert cafe, or even an eyeglass shop (or, an excellent flower shop), it seems everyone thinks they need to have coffee in the mix if they want to survive. That includes…


76. Mint Bloom Flower Cafe (Random Weekly Review)

In the highly, highly saturated Korea coffee shop game, it’s important to have a good product and an interesting concept–unfortunately, brand recognition doesn’t hurt, either–if you want to have any chance of lasting more than six months. There’s just so much.

Fortunately Mint Bloom Flower Cafe (Samgye-dong, Gimhae, 055-339-4919) has at least two of those essentials.

Located in Samgye-dong, Gimhae, the first thing I noticed when walking into this spacious cafe was the scent.

Fresh flowers.


65. – 68. Dongnae Coffee Shop, Manna Dream, Funny Salon, Happy Coffee (Gimhae)

65. Dongnae Coffee Shop. This place, in the Yeonji Park lightrail station section of Gimhae, is so small and innocuous I didn't even notice it at first. But, they made me a decent cup of 2-shot Americano for a reasonable price.

65. Dongnae Coffee Shop. This place, in the Yeonji Park lightrail station section of Gimhae, is so small and innocuous I didn’t even notice it at first. But, they made me a decent cup of 2-shot Americano for a reasonable price.


60. – 64. Paris Baguette, Tous les Jours, T-World Cafe, Davich Cafe & Caffe, Issac Toast & Coffee (Gimhae)

These are the “not just coffee” entries that, nonetheless, must be mentioned. Why? Well, because they sell coffee, dagnabbit.

I have established some (arbitrary) rules for when a business gets on the list. There is no need to artificially inflate the numbers. As a commenter noted in a recent post: “I have never seen so many coffee shops in my life.”


56. – 59. Cafe Beato, Mins Coffee, Capia, JaJeonGo Poong Gyong (Gimhae)

In Korea, one will often find the same kind of commerce specialties side-by-side-by-side. As if the logic goes that if one business is popular, others selling similar product should set up shop in the same location. This applies to cell phone shops (ad nauseum, it should be noted), restaurants and, absolutely, coffee shops.

Here are four located very, very close to one of the schools I teach at during the week. At least I’ll never be without caffeine on Wednesdays!


47. – 50. Makimaki Roasters, Grangba, Chung Choon Cafe, Blue Windmill (Gimhae)

47. Makimaki Roasters. This is part of a group of I am assuming independent coffee shops, which include one called Another Coffee Company. I hope that name was given tongue-in-cheek.
47. Makimaki Roasters. My friend, Danielle, loves this place. This is part of a group of I am assuming independent coffee shops, which include one called Another Coffee Company.

43. – 46. BC800, Caffe D’ate, Monorail Coffee, Dahlia Dolci (Gimhae)

What does the BC in BC800 stand for? Before Christ? Before Coffee? 800 years before coffee? I'm so confused. This chain's location was photographed in Samgye, Gimhae.
What does the BC in BC800 stand for? Before Christ? Before Coffee? 800 years before coffee? I’m so confused.

35. – 38. Green Bean, Cafe Byul, Nidor Coffee, Coffee # (Gimhae)

Green Bean. Green exterior. Appropriate.
Green Bean. Green exterior. Appropriate.
Cafe Byul.  </div>

    <div class=

24. L’Revelry (Random Weekly Review)

There are real people behind the many, many, many coffee shops that line the streets of South Korea.

Recently, I noticed the closure of a cafe owned by a friend and former associate of Wart’s here in Gimhae. I had planned to get a photo of it and even do one of these “RWR’s” for it because of its personal connection, as well as its Konglish-y name, (which I won’t mention here. Why kick the coffee cup when it’s empty?). Now, in place of yet another coffee shop, will be yet another barbecue restaurant (it seems). Hopefully, Wart’s friend did not lose a lot of money from the business venture. But, I have to imagine at least something was lost.

I thought about this when I popped into L’Revelry after work today.


20. – 23. Cafe Sweet Coax, Cafe Tirol, The Caffe, Yellow Coffee (Gimhae)

Here are a few of the coffee shops I can walk to. Some, like Cafe Sweet Coax, are close enough that I could walk to all the time if I was in love with their coffee. Others, like Yellow Coffee, may be a bit too far for a last second decision, but are still close enough if I cannot resist having a little color with my caffeine.


12. – 15. Angel-in-us, Tom N Toms, Ediya, Dunkin’ Donuts (Gimhae)

Here are four of the most visible coffee shop chains you will find in South Korea. All of these locations were photographed in Gimhae.


7. – 11. Cafe Do, Cafe Friends, Imperial Coffee, Coffee Tree, Let it be (Gimhae)

These were the coffee shops that surrounded my first apartment in Gimhae I lived in for two months at the beginning of 2014. I took a ride back to that area Friday morning to see what remained and what had gone to the caffeinated clouds in the sky.


7. – 11. Cafe Do, Cafe Friends, Imperial Coffee, Coffee Tree, Let it be

These were the coffee shops that surrounded my first apartment in Gimhae I lived in for two months at the beginning of 2014. I took a ride back to that area Friday morning to see what remained and what had gone to the caffeinated clouds in the sky.


All the Coffee in Korea: Resurrection

In the past two years, the number of coffee shops in South Korea has only grown.

In September 2013, while still living and teaching in Busan, I had an idea to chronicle the vast number of caffeinated businesses South Korea has on offer. I dubbed it “All the Coffee in Korea.” I had big plans, including reviewing all the coffee in Korea. I stopped after reviewing one, the BC800 Coffee and Tea which had recently opened in humble Jangnim.

I don’t even remember there being a Starbucks in Jinju eight years ago. I remember Holly’s Coffee and that’s really it. And now, you can hardly find any of those. But, don’t worry, there are plenty of other options.


Viewing 2015 Through the Lens of 2014

It’s about noon at the Dunphy house on the east coast of the USA, in sunny but chilly Middletown, New Jersey. Dad just put a small sausage pizza in his NuWave countertop oven and I am writing a blog about it. The pizza from ShopRite was 50% off, which means it will be even more delicious.

Meanwhile, back in Busan and Gimhae, South Korea, 2015 celebrations are well underway. And from here it feels like a dream. Or something long ago. Or something that hasn’t happened yet.

But, it’s something I’ll be back in the midst of in a few days after an 18-day sojourn over several seas. Thus, all the time, sleeping pills, early, early mornings and compromised digestive tracts will need to be calibrated anew. Shit. Maybe a poor choice of words.


Gyeongunsa Temple – 경운사 (Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do)

CSC_1433

The beautiful main hall and grounds at Gyeongunsa Temple in Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do.

Hello Again Everyone!!

Gyeongunsa Temple is located on the west side of Gimhae and past a few plots of land that grow vegetables. Located at the base of Mt. Gyeongunsan is the temple by the very same name: Gyeongunsa Temple.


Buddhist Mornings, Mountain Discoveries in Gimhae

I noticed a trend this week.

On Tuesday and Thursday, I was in fantastic moods. The kids at school, even the annoying ones, didn’t annoy me so much. I enjoyed work, I enjoyed food, air, sun and exercise.

Thumbs Up

On Wednesday, I felt like a bear getting punched in his testicles.

1916940_269829150456_3835873_n


한국어 Ronald McDonald Spreads the Gospel in Gimhae

A new McDonald’s opened recently in Gimhae–not that far from the old one, but this isn’t a post to complain about that. While our group was meeting to head over to a local orphanage (aren’t we the best?), we were accosted by none other than Ronald McDonald himself. Or, at least his Korean counterpart. And despite this man’s valiant effort to stay upbeat, a number of noticeable facial expressions and mannerisms led several of us to assume he probably wasn’t “lovin’ it” on this lovely Saturday afternoon in South Korea. Ba-da-bum-bum-bum!


Korean Convenience Store Food! GS25 Spaghetti & Meatballs

Some Korean interpretations on international foods are perfectly fine, especially in recent years. The number of burger joints is increasing, and with it, the quality. In this part of the peninsula (in Gimhae, a short lightrail journey back in Busan, the second largest city in South Korea), I can be sitting in front of a hot, delicious plate of fish & chips in about an hour.


Late Night Revelations on Korea Made Over GS25 Sandwiches

Ignorance breeds contempt. It seems obvious (and sounds like something I’ve heard before), yet when you’re away from your “normal” lifestyle, it can be easy to keep thinking in the way you’ve been thinking before entering your new normal. And that alone can help to shift how one thinks, both in this normal and the normal you’ll eventually return to.

Huh? Let me try to explain.

I come from a family of complainers. Whether it was something in society or in an annoying commercial, our gut reactions have always been to complain about it. Because that feels like we’re doing something about it. “I obviously am against this, and will show my disapproval of it to someone else who is against it by bitching about it.” But, that’s where action usually ended.


The August Expat Bloodbath 2014 Edition: A Preview

Buddhists and motivational speeches have both taught that nothing in life is permanent or guaranteed. This becomes clearer when time is measured in one-year contracts.

With the first semester coming to a close in South Korean public schools, many expats are preparing for their next adventures. Many of them I consider my friends.

I wrote about this biannual occurrence, dubbed “The August Expat Bloodbath,” last year. Much of that remains true, so instead of repeating myself, I’ll just quote myself:


Gaya Land

gaya land-1

When someone asks you “Hey do you want to wake up at 5 am on a Saturday and drive an hour to a place you’ve never been to take photos…” you might have to think about it. When the sentence is finished with “… of an abandoned amusement park?” You immediately say “YES” That is how my weekend started.

gaya land-11


Sensing a Sense of Place

Today is two weeks and two days since I moved to Gimhae.

Image
“Gimha Fo You,” their rejected slogan.

Located northwest of Busan, connected by a lightrail that serves as the defacto fifth line in the Busan subway system, I thought I was just moving to another part of the city I have called home for over a year. Slipping into Gimhae-si would be like slipping into an old pair of shoes. No problem, I thought as I left the United States, New Jersey, after only 12 days…


Talk Talk, Two Weeks Inside Gimhae

There’s too much talk to what’s been said.
Let’s breathe a little longer.
Pause three beats instead of one.
If anyone complains, maybe they should try it.
Not enough beats? Maybe there’s more.
Four or a score, because the words from your vacuum
Are just so fucking poor, suck riches from the world,
Give no change at the door, only piss for the floor.
Your mind is gone.
That’s it.
It’s gone. Where is it?
Let’s put it back in the center of the situation.
Listen to the rain outside. It’s beautiful.
Your focus is unfocused.
It’s not bad. But, you’re going to make it worse if you worry.
Why worry? We’re not here for long.
Your biggest misfortune is someone’s miracle.
You’re fat and healthy and people love you.
So, let’s breathe a little longer.


Doggie Travel

Bringing a dog from Korea to America is much easier than bringing a dog from America to Korea.

Just the idea of 33 hours of travel makes Eunee exhausted.

Here is what you have to do, We left from Gimhae but I imagine everything is the same through Seoul.


Busan by Night | A Travel Photo Essay

Photos by Ju-seok Oh. Words by Peter DeMarco.

See Korea’s most “dynamic” city at her best – when the sun goes down.


Syndicate content

Koreabridge - RSS Feeds
Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge - Facebook Group

Koreabridge - Googe+ Group