friendship

My Renewal Decision and 4 Life Lessons That Helped Me Make It

After thinking heavily about whether or not to renew my contract with EPIK, I’ve decided to return home in August. Signing on for a second year would offer me several enticing financial benefits and mouthwatering travel opportunities. And I’ve had a positive experience at my school, where I would continue to work if I were to renew. But during my time in Korea, I’ve learned or re-learned four life lessons, and made some new discoveries about myself, that have persuaded me to wrap things up at the one-year mark.


So Long, Farewell: It hurts when friends leave Korea.

 

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I won’t lie, last week in Korea was rough. I should have been elated for the upcoming weekend forecast of warm weather and birthday celebrations for yours truly, but my heart was a little crushed. A handful of fellow teachers departed or began preparations for the journey home. Each time someone leaves I realize how much they’ve influenced my time abroad. I mean, come on, they basically made it.

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American looking for Korean Buddies

Hello, I am an American English teacher in the USA looking for Korean friends. I like meeting people from around the world. My Skype is kenneth.fach, and my website is http://soykenneth.blogspot.com . South Korea is a fascinating region of the world, and although I have friends in other parts of the world, having lived in Paraguay, Mexico and Germany, I have very few friends from South Korea.


‎(Jun 30) Sinchon Int'l Party신촌 외국인 친구 영어 파티 + Free Club Entrance

Date: 
Saturday, June 30, 2012 - 19:30

 


a bad case of facebook envy & 5 lessons learned abroad (so far)

*Be the person you envy. Live the life you’d be envious of if you saw someone else living it.*

Here is my first travel piece published in my hometown NH newspaper. I hope to write a piece each month for the paper – wish me luck. I have included the first paragraph and you can click the link for the rest. What should I write about next?


Losing Friends: the nature of working in Korea

If you come to Korea to make new friends, seek new adventures, save money and travel, you have definitely made the right decision. Korea provides all that. One thing to consider, that you may not bargain for, is that your new friends will be saying “see ya later” in a short time. That is, if you plan to stay beyond your first contract year.


Goodbyes

This one was written over a month ago now in the wake of the ending of my relationship with Fallon. I wasn't sure I wanted to post it, but it seems right that such a significant period in my life be commemorated on my site. I've not edited it at all since I wrote it in early January.

Goodbyes are a common part of life on the road. Differing itineraries and budgets mean that no friendship or relationship on the road can last forever. Eventually you'll have to part ways and experience that bittersweet mix of emotions as you're both grateful for the time you've had with a person and sad that the time was not longer.

For almost two years I was lucky enough to have shared a path with Fallon. Having met at a house party in Gwangju, we bonded over our mutual hatred of night clubs and our mutual closeness to our families.


Women in Korea #4, Part 1 - Friendship


26:59 minutes (12.36 MB)
Women in Korea #4, Part 1
May 23, 2010

Topic: Friendship in Korea
Participants: Anneth Bun-as, Ashley Summers Stubberman, Jiang Fen, Mindy Sisco

GIFT Ministry in Dongnae (now with free Korean classes)

Every day we face choices, new tasks, new challenges, new obstacles, sometimes new jobs, new relationships, and for many of you a new or different life in a new country and culture different from where you grew up. It helps to have a community around you to help you adjust and learn to adapt quickly, see the sites,  share your experiences and ideas with and to just hang out and relax together. GIFT Ministry (website: http://tinyurl.com/lifeisagift) is a friendly community trying to help English speakers in Busan make the most of life here.

One new program we are offering is free Korean classes at 2pm on Saturdays for beginners.  These can help make navigating life in Korea quite a bit easier, more efficient and we have an experienced, very kind and helpful Korean teacher who speaks excellent English leading them! Come join and "level up" your Korean :).


BIWA - Busan International Women's Association

The Busan International Women's Association is a charitable social and cultural organization open to women living in the Busan and Kyungsang Namdo area of South Korea. As a non-profit organization we raise money to help those in the local Korean community who are in need.

BIWA encourages friendship, support, and cultural exchange between our international and Korean members by organizing a wide variety of social and cultural activities. 

Contact us via our website - http://www.biwa-korea.com/

 


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