election

Nostalgia for a Despot: an Armchair Perspective of Korea’s Present

The big talking point in the land of the morning calm is undoubtedly the election of the conservative party candidate Park Geun Hye to the presidency. Park’s father is man by the name of Park Chung Hee, whose name is both revered and reviled in Korea. Park Geun Hye is a woman, but more in the vein of Margaret Thatcher, where it could be argued gender is incidental.

Park’s election has sparked plenty of talk due to her relationship with her father who ruled this nation with a very controversial iron fist for the best part of two decades in the 1960s and 1970s. While I didn’t follow the election race in too much depth, I know that Park’s victory ticked all the boxes in terms of surprise, disappointment, doom, and any other negative or positive political emotion you can think up.


December Memories: Day 17

election day
It seems as though Koreans get far more openly into their politics than they do in Britain.
I was walking through the underground two nights before election day, a national holiday
in Korea and every 100 metres or so there was someone trying a weird gimmick to get
people to vote for their party. My favourite was this dog with the yellow ribbon in

The A – Z of Korea

A is for anjou … anjou, oh anjou, I don’t really want to eat you because I’ve just had dinner and the idea of having to eat more really doesn’t make me want to stay drinking here. To add insult to injury, eating is cheating.

B is for booze … booze, yes booze. Korea is infamous for its alcohol consumption rate. Korea has one of the highest alcohol consumption rates in the OECD. You won’t here too many over in KNTO towers (or whatever the Korean tourism crowd is called now) sharing such interesting facts with you. What’s interesting about drink culture here is, even though there is so much alcohol consumed, drinking has so many social rules, it’s a wonder that anyone bothers with it at all.


A Letter to Canada

Hello, and congratulations!
 
I hear you're having another election.  I'm so excited.  Will it
be a girl or a boy this time?  A conservative or a really conservative?
Oh, Canada, you're so fertile, turning out representative democracy
at a scale that makes us, your neighbors to the south, blush with envy.  ^^
 
I do have to say, I don't know WHAT to get you, though.  I mean,
you just had an election and I got you that nice sweater set, and now a no-confidence vote?  Anything to get that hot voter-on-poll action you're so fond of, right?&n

An open letter to ATEK's new president

Dear Mr. Dolezal,

Congratulations on winning the ATEK presidential election, as reported in the Korea Herald (HT to Rob York - you guys really should sign him up to write your press releases) While I'm sure the news will be surprising to some, I trust that the members of ATEK will accept you through the democratic process that has been followed.


Your challenges are many, and I'm sorry to say that there are almost as many critics as supporters. Your job will be tough, but quite a bit of work has already been done. Contacts have been made, some battles have been won, and there are many opportunities to improve things. The road towards better treatment for foreigners in Korea is long - this is mile number 2 of a very long marathon.


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