Koreabridge Blog Section

  • Beomeosa in black and white

    Took a Sunday stroll up Guemjeong and witnessed evening rites; visiting bhikkus from Thailand were led around in their orange robes and the abbot of Beomeosa passed everyone a gift of his calligraphy (us too). The temple was muffled in dribbly evening haze. Five people quietly watched the monks exit the hall single file and chant the heart sutra into the mountains like a hoarse fight song; an ode to awakening. Metaphysical mercenaries. Many were quite young. I was surprised. Drums and bells echoed and reverberated, tinkling and bouncing through the evening air as white mist mushroomed off the southern peaks.  It was a long weekend, and a bleary eyed Sunday, also the first day of monsoon season, and the scene, my mind swamped in stale smoke and alcohol,made me wonder why I don’t go up there more often.


  • South Korea Trip - Daegu 대구

    Alright you can check out the video of my trip from Busan to Daegu in South Korea. The trip in total was 420 kms. I rode the #14 highway out of Busan to the #25 all the way to Daegu and went back the same way to Busan.

  • Tempura alert!


    A while back I wrote about Korean Tempura, the lightly battered and deep fried bits and pieces that seems to be one of the most popular street foods here in Busan. At the time, I was in the middle of open class hell (just finished!) and found my stall of choice to be fresh, satisfying and cheap.

  • Mike vs the Mozzies

    Busan, 18/6/09. I write this blog as I'm holed up in my bunker, fighting against an army the likes of which Kim Jong-Il can only dream about. This army is small, well co-ordinated, can strike at any time of day, and can drive any potential opponent to screaming suicidal distraction. I'M TALKING, OF COURSE, ABOUT THE HUMBLE MOSQUITO. Dinner time has become a well co-ordinated effort, whic...

  • Mike vs the Mozzies...

    Busan, 18/6/09. I write this blog as I'm holed up in my bunker, fighting against an army the likes of which Kim Jong-Il can only dream about. This army is small, well co-ordinated, can strike at any time of day, and can drive any potential opponent to screaming suicidal distraction. I'M TALKING, OF COURSE, ABOUT THE HUMBLE MOSQUITO. Dinner time has become a well co-ordinated effort, whic...

  • Mike vs the Mozzies...

    Busan, 18/6/09. I write this blog as I'm holed up in my bunker, fighting against an army the likes of which Kim Jong-Il can only dream about. This army is small, well co-ordinated, can strike at any time of day, and can drive any potential opponent to screaming suicidal distraction. I'M TALKING, OF COURSE, ABOUT THE HUMBLE MOSQUITO. Dinner time has become a well co-ordinated effort, whic...

  • Pajeon and on.


    I have wanted to write about pajeon, the Korean seafood pancake, ever since I started this blog. It was one of the first street foods I ever tried in Korea and since then I’ve eaten it in a countless number of bars, restaurants and tents throughout the city. It’s hands down my favorite Korean food and when someone doesn’t like it, I can’t help but take it a little personally, such is my relationship with the stuff.

  • 2nd Annual Korean National Toastmasters Conference

    The reason I'm pretty enthusiastic about Toastmasters in general is because they're a non-profit organisation aimed at improving your leadership, social networking, public speaking and communication skills.

    And they are fond of alcohol.

    Although the first Toastmasters club opened in Korea in 1992, it was only last year that they held the first conference and speech contest. I attended this year out of sheer curiousity.

  • Signs of Progress

    This is a pretty crummy picture but what it represents is a bit of a milestone for me. Since I had the surgery my condition has improved dramatically and Yujin and I went on a long walk with mild exertion on Saturday and a long hike with serious exertion on Sunday (up the cable car and over and down the other side and back up to Seokbulsa, the temple carved in stone) and neither time did I suffer even mild symptoms. It wasn't very hot though, which is the true test. It was great to be able to get out and do some hiking.

  • Dakbal: Chicken Feet


  • Jokbal: Pigs Feet


  • Cheap Sunglasses

    Why, in a country where an umbrella can be purchased for W5000 ($3.50), is it so hard to find a good pair of cheap sunglasses? I lose (or break) sunglasses at a rate which precludes purchasing an expensive pair. The ones I see at HomePlus and the like are cheap, but they are priced at W30,000 and up. Someone somewhere is getting rich off sunglasses. The same goes for watches. The plain analog Casio's I see everywhere being sold for W70,000 are in the dollar store at home. I am also frustrated by the price and selection of clothing my size (biggish). I am still wearing what is left of the wardrobe I brought with me a year ago. It is wearing thin. An uncapped pen and a rainy struggle over a taxi claimed two shirts. Most of my t-shirts have lost their former shape as a result of the humidity and the clothes line. The situation is becoming somewhat critical.

  • Wow for Now (Hot dogs)



    I’ll be the first to admit I’ve talked shit about Korean sausages in the past. In my experience, they either amounted to little more than rolled up spam, or they were dripping with so much of that scary looking see-through fat, just looking at them set one arm a-tingling. Why, I often wondered, couldn’t they be more like those little Thai firecrackers I saw on Eating Asia that time?

  • Soutjh Korea Trip - Gyeongju 경주

    Alright you can check out the video of my trip from Busan to Gyeongju in South Korea. The trip in total was 220 kms. I rode the #14 highway out of Busan and the #35 back to Busan.

  • Birthdays, Babies, Brunch and Busan

    I turned 27 late last month. I remember when I was around 8 years old, I couldn't wait to be a year older. Back then it always seemed that birthdays were an eternity away. Then as you get older you wish they'd stop coming so often. My personal theory is that although time is constant, our comprehension of it changes as we get older. When we're young, our brains are constantly processing so much brand new information that the experience of living seems to drag on forever. But after we've been around for a while, we get used to the same old stuff so our brain ignores a lot of things and time speeds up.

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